Who are the new Tenants?


#1

Mark 12:1-12:

He began to speak to them in parables. “A man planted a vineyard, put a hedge around it, dug a wine press, and built a tower. Then he leased it to tenant farmers and left on a journey. 2 At the proper time he sent a servant to the tenants to obtain from them some of the produce of the vineyard. 3 But they seized him, beat him, and sent him away empty-handed. 4 Again he sent them another servant. And that one they beat over the head and treated shamefully. 5 He sent yet another whom they killed. So, too, many others; some they beat, others they killed. 6 He had one other to send, a beloved son. He sent him to them last of all, thinking, ‘They will respect my son.’ 7 But those tenants said to one another, ‘This is the heir. Come, let us kill him, and the inheritance will be ours.’ 8 So they seized him and killed him, and threw him out of the vineyard. 9 What (then) will the owner of the vineyard do? He will come, put the tenants to death, and give the vineyard to others. 10 Have you not read this scripture passage: ‘The stone that the builders rejected has become the cornerstone; 11 by the Lord has this been done, and it is wonderful in our eyes’?” 12 They were seeking to arrest him, but they feared the crowd, for they realized that he had addressed the parable to them. So they left him and went away.

I’ve come to realize that we read and interpret the Scriptures according to the lense we are wearing. Someone will interpret Scriptures according to their beliefs. For instance someone who believes in Pre-Destination (actually double Pre-Des, but that’s another thread) once interpreted for me the parable of the Sheep and the Goats as the Sheep are Pre-Destined for heaven and the Goats are Pre-Destined for hell (again, another thread for that one).

With that preface, I’d like to know who the new Tenants are in this Parable. Most of my Christian Brothers from other Faiths feel that the Church in invisible, yet this parable (to me, at least) tends to show that some people were still given authority in the New Israel.


#2

This is a very interesting passage.

I read it as an explanation for why Christians are not still Jews.


#3

Actually, I think it explains why the leadership was taken away, not so much as to why the Mosaic Law was incomplete.

Look again at the last line

for they realized that he had addressed the parable to them.The “them” are the Pharisees who are the tenants, or overseers of the Jewish Faith at this time. This doesn’t seem to chastise the vineyard (Israel) as much as the tenants.


#4

That is a very good point.


#5

Yes. If you look at the end of chapter 11, it is the chief priests and scribes Jesus is preaching to, and not-so-subtly admonishing – and after the parable of the vineyard, the Pharisees and Sadduccees return in an attempt to test him, and we get four famous teachings in response: pay your taxes, marriage is a non-issue in heaven, the commandment of love, and the widow’s mite. The other messengers sent by the master in the parable refer to the old prophets, many of whom were not well-treated by their own people; and the son is, of course, Jesus himself.


#6

OK, so who are the new Tenants of the Vineyard?


#7

I would say the Jews and Gentiles alike. The Pharisees and Sadducees are kicked out, and salvation becomes available to all, if they will have faith and tend the vineyard well.


#8

The Vineyard itself is the New Israel, Jews and Gentiles alike.

But to tend to the vineyard implies authority. The tenants are planting, cultivating, etc.

Who, in the New Israel, has authority? If the New Israel is an invisible body of believers, there would be no tenants, other than the Son, but Jesus doesn’t say this.


#9

To look at the parable in the context of the OT, you only need to look at Isaiah, chapter 5. Note the similarity in the way the vineyard is prepared:

My friend had a vineyard on a fertile hillside; 2 He spaded it, cleared it of stones, and planted the choicest vines; Within it he built a watchtower, and hewed out a wine press. Then he looked for the crop of grapes, but what it yielded was wild grapes. 3 Now, inhabitants of Jerusalem and men of Judah, judge between me and my vineyard: 4 What more was there to do for my vineyard that I had not done? Why, when I looked for the crop of grapes, did it bring forth wild grapes? 5 Now, I will let you know what I mean to do to my vineyard: Take away its hedge, give it to grazing, break through its wall, let it be trampled! 6 Yes, I will make it a ruin: it shall not be pruned or hoed, but overgrown with thorns and briers; I will command the clouds not to send rain upon it. 7 The vineyard of the LORD of hosts is the house of Israel, and the men of Judah are his cherished plant; He looked for judgment, but see, bloodshed! for justice, but hark, the outcry!

Now, look at Jesus’ parable in this light, and it is clear that the Pharisees and Jewish Leaders are the Tenants in Israel’s vineyard.So, again, who are the Tenants of the New Israel?


#10

Bump…


#11

Bishops.

CDL


#12

Thanks, Greg. But I’m looking for the Non-Catholic interpretation of this parable.


#13

[quote=NotWorthy]With that preface, I’d like to know who the new Tenants are in this Parable. Most of my Christian Brothers from other Faiths feel that the Church in invisible, yet this parable (to me, at least) tends to show that some people were still given authority in the New Israel.
[/quote]

Look at the parallel in Mt 21, particularly v43:**Matthew 21:43

“Therefore I say to you, the kingdom of God will be taken away from you and given to a people, producing the fruit of it.”**It’s more than “new authority,” it’s a whole “new people,” and more than just a “whole new people,” it’s a "whole new people characterized by, producing fruit”—the Church.

It’s not a change in “leadership”, but a people; the kingdom is being taken away from the Jews, not completely and forever, but temporarily, until the times of the gentiles be fulfilled (Lk 21:24; Jn 10:26; Rom 11:25).


#14

FWIW here are you american bishops thoughts on it…
[1-12] The vineyard denotes Israel (Isaiah 5:1-7). The tenant farmers are the religious leaders of Israel. God is the owner of the vineyard. His servants are his messengers, the prophets. The beloved son is Jesus (Mark 1:11; 9:7; Matthew 3:17; 17:5; Luke 3:22; 9:35). The punishment of the tenants refers to the religious leaders, and the transfer of the vineyard to others refers to the people of the new Israel.


#15

The RSV 2CE calls it “a new nation”.

As shown earlier in Isaiah, I believe the people are the vineyard itself. The vineyard needs tenants. Just as the sheep need a shepherd. Just as the branches need a vine.


#16

Aw, now that’s not fair. You know our opinions on the NAB… :wink:
With that being said,
[1-12] The vineyard denotes Israel (Isaiah 5:1-7). The tenant farmers are the religious leaders of Israel. God is the owner of the vineyard. His servants are his messengers, the prophets. The beloved son is Jesus (Mark 1:11; 9:7; Matthew 3:17; 17:5; Luke 3:22; 9:35). The punishment of the tenants refers to the religious leaders, and the transfer of the vineyard to others refers to the people of the new Israel.And here’s a good example.

The vineyard are the people. Correct. Are the people the new tenants, too?

Actually Simon, I’d like your opinion on it.


#17

Give me more, please. I’m not seeing a point. :o


#18

I think the Church Bishops and Priests are the new Tenants.

Jesus doesn’t say the Vineyard will grow grapes on its own. He’s going to give it to new people. People (in the vineyard analysis) are those that tend to the Grapes (the members of the New Covenant Church).

So, if we have an invisible church, where the Bible is the sole teaching authority, who are the these people who are the tenants?


#19

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