Who are your personal heros

I’m not sure that I’m putting this in the right thread (sorry ahead of time).
Who are your personal heros, they can be someone you know, someone famous, whoever.
My four personal heros.

Oskar Schindler
Wilm Hosenfeld
Karl Plagge
Blessed Damien of Molokai

GK Chesterton
Hilaire Belloc
Maurice Baring
St Thomas Aquinas
St Louis IX
St Dominic Guzman
St Athanasius
Alexander the Great
The Red Baron
Napoleon (look, it’s complicated, okay?)
Scipio Africanus

I have others, but people around here wouldn’t understand why they’re my heroes.

Dorothy Day and John Paul II

Jesus Christ
My Dad
My Grandfather
St. Michael the Archangel
St. Augustine
Antonio Vivaldi (The Red Priest)
Nikola Tesla

My faith heroes, taking Mary and the Saints as givens:

Benedict XVI (and not just because he’s currently visiting the US)
John Paul II
Fulton Sheen
J. R. R. Tolkien
C. S. Lewis
G. K. Chesterton
Ven. Michael J. McGivney (founder of the Knights of Columbus)
Our faithful ordained and religious

Secular heroes, none of whom I think of as perfect:

George W. Bush (please no discussion about his failings–I don’t think of him as perfect nor agree with everything he’s said and done.)
Our police, fire and medical first responders
Our military
My dh and all hardworking people who are under-appreciated.
My deceased mom and dad who sacrificed so much to give their children all they could.

Jesus, Mary and St. Joseph.

St. Patrick (converted my ancestors)
St. Lawrence (patron of chefs, martyr, and going to be my confirmation saint)
St. Columba and the Irish monks who evangelized Europe

My mom and Fr. B. for helping to lead me back to the Church.

Military, Police, Fire Fighters, first responders.

Your more than welcome to share your other heros. I’d like to think that not matter what opinion one may have of your heros they would be good enough to respect that they are your heros.
I wouldn’t be surprised if someone made a comment about Oskar Schindler being at the top of my list, seeing as he did sometimes live an immoral life.

St. Thomas the Apostle
St. Thomas More

Abraham Lincoln
Wm. Tecumseh Sherman

George Soros
Robert Shapiro
Gerald Joyce
and the late Leslie Orgel
David Hume
John Rawls
Peter Singer
Paul Krugman
John Stuart Mill

[LIST]
*]St. Augustine (his writing convinced me that there is room for a person like me within the Church).
*]Myrna Nazzour (her visions and stigmata convinced me that there are more things in heaven and earth than were dreamt of in my philosophy).
*]St. Maria Goretti (if I can have but half her courage at 3x her age, I will die a happy man).
*]Padre Pio (What a role model for the efficacy of prayer!)
*]Fr Sheehan (Every parish should have one).
[/LIST]

I’ll throw in a few:-

Jimi Hendrix (not EVERY aspect of his life but his approach to music and his genuine humility regarding a great talent)
Miles Davis
Joni Mitchell (and yes I know she has what can be seen as anti-Catholic views in some songs)
JRR Tolkien
Ursula Le Guin
Patrick Pearse
James Connolly
Countess Markievicz
Wolfe Tone
Mark Twain
Martin Luther King
Ashoka the Great
Chief Joseph
St. Francis of Assisi

That’s enough to be going on.

George Soros
Robert Shapiro
Gerald Joyce
and the late Leslie Orgel
David Hume
John Rawls
Peter Singer
Paul Krugman
John Stuart Mill

All on my enemies list;)

My heroes are St Thomas More and all the English Martyrs for their defense of the Faith. I also admire Pierre Toussaint for his dignity, and his charity toward all. On the secular side, I admire among many others, Mozart, Jane Austen, Caravaggio, Michaelangelo and all who bring beauty to the world.

Forgot to put:

Robert Greenstein
Robert Reich
Ezra Klein
Markos Moulitsas
Lawrence Mishel

and the fictional Marufuji Ryo

Forgot to add

PZ Myers and
Randall Parker

John Paul II

My mother. She was the epitome of self sacrifice. She even house cleaned her bedroom the day before she died. She was making a cup of tea for me when she collapsed. Loving, caring and very brave.

An aunt who was another caring person. She never said a bad or unkind word about anyone. And I mean anyone. She lived by the words, “if you can’t say something good about someone, say nothing at all.”

I guess my list is divided into two categories-those famous and those not famous.

Famous
**Amy Grant:**I love her music and it always makes me feel good when I listen to it.
Harper Lee: I love To Kill a Mockingbird-it reflects the need for social change and shows the need for each person to be treated with respect. It always reflects a great relationship between a father and a daughter, something of which I never had.
Freddie Mercury: Okay, granted, his life was very hedonistic. However, what I admire him for was the fact that he *didn’t *make his sexuality an issue-he wasn’t out there parading it and flauntng it, like so many gay activists do. Plus, I absolutely love his music, and the music of Queen in general. Great stuff.
Elizabeth George: I know some on this thread may be unfamiliar with her work, but she’s a writer of Christian books that focus on the needs of women and how women can be better Christians. Her books have had a profound influence on my life.

Only Famous to Me
My Mom: She has overcome so many trials and tribulations in her life. She’s seen her faults, admitted them, and asked for forgiveness. However, she’s learned from her mistakes and not wasted them. If all moms could be like her, our world would be much better.
My Grandfather: He died a couple of years ago. He was more like a father than a grandfather. Ever patient and humble, he never said an unkind word about anyone. He was someone you never wanted to hurt or betray, someone you never wanted to be angry with you. He inspired love and devotion in everyone around him and I wish I could be more like him.
Bob Monts: He’s one of my professors at college. He’s full of knowledge and intellect, but never uses it to try and make himself look smart and he’s never arrogant. He’s always looking out for the well-fare of his students and is also willing to talk about his faults and past mistakes so that his students can not only learn book-knowledge, but also lessons that life teaches that can’t be found in books.
NotWorthy: Yes, the guy here on the forums. He and I pm quite regularly. He’s open, honest, humble, and devoted to those he loves. He admits his faults but never allows them to deter him from his relationship with Christ. He gives help and support freely when asked for it, but doesn’t force it on someone. He’s kind, generous, patient, and more than willing to listen to the rantings of an individual when she’s having a bad day;).

Scout :tiphat:

Mattie Stepanek. God rest his soul.

Here’s his website: mattieonline.com/

One of them’s Joe McCarthy (trust me, 9/10s of what everyone’s heard about him was a lie–starting with “he was wrong” and going from there).

Also Maximilian Robespierre, the French Revolutionary, one of the few true political idealists. He was anti-Catholic because he sincerely believed it was a false religion of human manufacture, and only supported the Terror because he thought it was the desire of the French people. And he just had a way with words: “I have done everything I can,” one of his generals said, to explain why he’d surrendered to the Germans. Robespierre’s reply: “Did you die?”

And Hijikata Toshizou, the second-in-command of the private militia called the Shinsengumi–nicknamed “The Oni” (an ogre-like spirit that tracks down sinners and drags them to the Buddhist hells) because of his harsh, unyielding leadership. Violating any of the rules he created (such as “no private grudges” and “no deviating from the path proper to a samurai”), meant one had to commit harakiri. But he forbade married men and only sons to join, so as not to destroy any families, and voted for the removal of their founder, Serizawa Kamo, when Serizawa used the group’s power to racketeer–and, rather than letting his comrades take on the responsibility alone, assisted in Serizawa’s assassination, when Serizawa refused to step down. Hijikata was a harsh, violent man, but he, more than any of the other members, exemplified their motto, "Makoto"–sincerity or integrity.

And Hijikata Toshizou, the second-in-command of the private militia called the Shinsengumi–nicknamed “The Oni” (an ogre-like spirit that tracks down sinners and drags them to the Buddhist hells) because of his harsh, unyielding leadership. Violating any of the rules he created (such as “no private grudges” and “no deviating from the path proper to a samurai”), meant one had to commit harakiri. But he forbade married men and only sons to join, so as not to destroy any families, and voted for the removal of their founder, Serizawa Kamo, when Serizawa used the group’s power to racketeer–and, rather than letting his comrades take on the responsibility alone, assisted in Serizawa’s assassination, when Serizawa refused to step down. Hijikata was a harsh, violent man, but he, more than any of the other members, exemplified their motto, “Makoto”–sincerity or integrity.

Very interesting Hastrman. I will have to do some reading.

I agree about Joe McCarthy also.

Now is the point in the thread where I mention Vlad Tepes :wink: :eek:
Not too unlike Hijikata perhaps. Vlad Tepes (ascribed Vlad the Impaler in common folklore and the purported basis for Stoker’s Dracula) was born the son of Vlad II Dracul, the king of Wallachia. He and his brother Radu were given as vassals (they were hostages basically) to the Ottoman Turks. Dracul did this to appease the Muslims and forestall threat of invasion. While a young boy under the cruel supervision of the Turks, Vlad was whipped and beaten frequently. He also watched the Muslims brutally torture his countrymen. He grew to hate his brother Radu who was favored and treated more kindly by the future Sultan. He eventually attained the throne, his older brother brutally murdered. He maintained his hatred for the Ottoman Turks and eventually sided with Hungary and stopped paying tribute to the Sultanate. When the Turks assembled an army of around 90,000 troops to march on Vlad and Wallachia, they were greeted with a field of stakes with impaled Turkish prisoners on them. His psychological tactic and scant 30,000 troops were not enough and the Turks defeated him.

It was not long before the Ottomans withdrew, leaving Radu on the throne. Vlad, after a short guerilla war, was imprisoned for a time. He converted to Catholicism while in captivity. He gave generously to churches and monasteries in the region. He would fight the Ottoman forces again and eventually be killed in battle.

He lived a hard life, being tortured by the Muslims as a young boy and was witness to the torture and execution of many of his countrymen. He eventually found Christ and converted - generously giving to the Church and fighting the Ottoman advances, defending his people. There are stories of his cruel treatment of the guilty (and sometimes not so guilty) after his release from his time under the Sultan’s whip. Eastern Europe, particularly Romania, paint a much more respectful picture of him than Western Europe and the popular folklore passed down by Bram Stoker.

My Husband is my Personal Hero. He always puts me and our families needs & wants above his. He gets up every morning and goes to work while suffering with 3 different types of Arthritis & is always in pain. Even though he is in pain he never complains. He is my Personal Hero & I tell him so on a regular basis. Other than my DH, I would have to say Mother Angelica is a Personal Hero to me because she brought me into the Catholic Church & she suffered all her life with health issues & had a most difficult childhood.

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