Who was John Hus?


#1

could anyone out there please tell me what you know about this man who pre-dated Luther?? I’ve heard conflicting things…


#2

Jan Hus


#3

What do you mean by a steeper grade?


#4

A priest, theologian, preacher, university professor.

In 1999 John Paul II “expressed deep regret for the cruel death inflicted on John Hus, and for the consequent wound of conflict and division which was thus imposed on the minds and hearts of the Bohemian people.

Yet the truth which sets us free from error is also the truth which sets us free for love; and it is Christian love which has been the horizon of what your Commission has sought to do. Your work means that a figure like Jan Hus, who has been such a point of contention in the past, has now become a subject of dialogue, of comparison and shared investigation.”

from: vatican.va/holy_father/john_paul_ii/speeches/1999/december/documents/hf_jp-ii_spe_17121999_jan-hus_en.html

Sorry, I found only few texts in English, in Czech we have much more. :wink:

God bless you.


#5

Do you have a way to translate Czech into English using your browser?


#6

No, I don’t.
I haven’t needed yet to do so.
Could you please explain me how the browser works to translate something? Sorry for this ignorance. Thank you.


#7

It depends on your internet service provider. I have AT&T Yahoo. If I do a web search using the Yahoo browser and find a site that is in a language other than English, I can click on where it says “translate this page”, and my browser will translate from whatever language it is to English. I was hoping you had that feature so we could read the Pope’s comments in English that are on the Czech websites but not on the English websites. I have not tried Google yet to see if it has that feature.


#8

Hi,

there are some other web readings about John Hus and what John Paul II. said about whole issue:
vatican.va/holy_father/john_paul_ii/travels/documents/hf_jp-ii_spe_27041997_st-adalbert_en.html
no. 4
in 1997

vatican.va/jubilee_2000/magazine/documents/ju_mag_01012000_p-38_en.html
in 2000

I am not historian.
However, what I know there are these important facts:

November 1989 - the end of communist regime in Czech Republic. Hence history is freed from interpretation that sounded good for communist regime.

1990 - first pastoral visit of John Paul II in the Czechoslovakia. He said there first that it is good to see real John Hus and who he was

1993 - international symposium was held in Bayreuth, Germany, with the topic John Hus

1999 - international symposium about John Hus was held in Rome, John Paul II. expressed deep sorrow of John Hus death

Futher steps are contiuned, for example a letter to Benedict XVI. from ecumenical service in Czech Republic in July 2005
only in Czech and Latin: tisk.cirkev.cz/z-domova/husinecka-vyzva.html

Once again, I am not historian, but surely this is good to know.

:wink:


#9

Jan Hus has always been a hero of mine.

I think that some day he will be as honored as Saint Jeanne d’Arc.


#10

hmm…:hmmm:
I don’t realy think so. Anyway, it’s certainly profitable to know whole story, background and above all, to hate a sin BUT to love sinners …

:wink:


#11

I posted a thread awhile back entitled something like “Jan Hus, executed heretic or martyred saint?” But I think it got lost in the great crash of '06. I have a Czech friend, not Catholic, who had been sharing a lot about him with me.

He said he should have been declared a saint, but I said he wasn’t because he held and promoted Wycliff’s heretical views on the Eucharist.

The thread was a good discussion. I am so sad its gone. I wish I had copied it somewhere.


#12

Thanks for the info on Hus… I’ve since read some things about him. He definitely held heretical beliefs (predestination, etc.) so the Church was right to call him a heretic, but very wrong to burn him at the stake.

I am just wondering if the pope at that time had a lot to do with that decision? If he did, that would cause me to seriously doubt the Catholic faith, where nothing else i’ve heard or experienced to date has had that kind of power over my faith… :mad:
I just don’t understand how any Christian… especially a Catholic, can condone that kind of behavior…
Whatever happened to “Whoever is without sin, let him/her cast the first stone”?
Sometimes, i just get very angry at “the Church”… and can relate to Protestants who resist joining her… :mad:
But anyway, i will never leave because i have found Jesus there in the Real Presence… I could question everything else (and have) but that is what keeps me there… I can’t prove this or that about history because i wasn’t there (and those who write history books are fallible humans)… but I do know the reality of Jesus at the Blessed Sacrament… :o


#13

Thanks for the info on Hus… I’ve since read some things about him. He definitely held heretical beliefs (predestination, etc.) so the Church was right to call him a heretic, but very wrong to burn him at the stake.

I am just wondering if the pope at that time had a lot to do with that decision? If he did, that would cause me to seriously doubt the Catholic Church… whereas nothing else i’ve heard or experienced to date has had that kind of power over my faith… :mad:
I just don’t understand how any Christian… especially a Catholic, can condone that kind of behavior…
Whatever happened to “Whoever is without sin, let him/her cast the first stone”?
Sometimes, i just get very angry at “the Church”… and can relate to Protestants who resist joining her… :mad:
But anyway, i will never leave because i have found Jesus there in the Real Presence… I could question everything else (and have) but that is what keeps me there… I can’t prove this or that about history because i wasn’t there (and those who write history books are fallible humans)… but I do know the reality of Jesus at the Blessed Sacrament… :o


#14

i doubt it. He believed things t hat were totally off base, totally heretical.

It was wrong to burn him at the stake but he was definitely not a saint… He was a heretic…


#15

I just don’t understand how any Christian… especially a Catholic, can condone that kind of behavior…

We must remember to keep the time period in context. That does not mean that anyone should condone burning someone at the stake (or execution in general). Yet, please remember that the 15th Century was not the 21st Century.

The ideas we have today on human rights and individual freedoms that are found in the European Union, United Nations Charter, and the United States law would have been laughable in those days.

Even after the “enlightenment” no national leader would have taken such an individualist notion seriously.

Again, I’m not defending the execution of Jan Hus (and I would not presume to do so, I agree with Pope John Paul II). Yet, we are often too quick to make the mistake of placing our modern values on medieval life. There was a Zeitgeist for those times and I daresay that people like Hus, Ignatius Loyala, Luther, Calvin, Polycarp, John Knox, Elizabeth I…onto an endless list of historical figures would simply not understand our modern view of the world any more than we can fully appreciate theirs.


#16

Yes it was the burning that our late Holy Father was apologizing for, not declaring him a heretic.

It was a different time then. Capital punishment was doled out freely. I believe that the people of the time took the crime of endangering someone’s soul more seriously than endangering a mortal life. I can’t say I totally disagree. His teachings caused so many people to leave the Church. I don’t think he needed to die, but I wasn’t around then to see the extent of his damage so I cannot really say.

As I’ve said, ‘I hope he made peace with God before he died.’ I hope everybody makes peace with God before they die. While I don’t support Capital punishment, a Catholic can for justified reasons, support it. Criminals have earned their punishment. They are not innocent and therefore not murdered.

If Hus was truly guilty, his death can be justified. I don’t know enough about the apology by JPII. Was he apologizing because it was a “cruel death” or because he was put to death in the first place?


#17

Vaclav you beat me to it! I type too slowly I guess. :slight_smile:


#18

About the death of Jan Hus was decided during the Council of Constance in 1415.
That time, unfortunately :ehh:, three popes were sure they are a true pope.
Gregory XII. abdicated, Benedict XIII was deposed 1417 by the same Council of Constance, John XXIII. was deposed too. Than, in 1417 by the same Council of Constance was elected the pope Martin V.

about Council of Constance
newadvent.org/cathen/04288a.htm
For camparison it is worth reading also from Wikipedia:
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Council_of_Constance

I am personally for the line of Gregory XI, Urban VI, Boniface IX, Innocent VII, Gregory XII.
Council of Constance was not started by the pope Gregory XII. So, there is a lot of circumstances to understand first before to grasp a true insight onto Jan Hus for me!

But I would say again, that Jan Hus is today a subject of dialogue, of comparison and shared investigation.
from:vatican.va/holy_father/jo…an-hus_en.html

:wink:


#19

Jon Hus was a heritic. Luther revived many of his heritical ideas. Hus was burned at the stake after being promised a safe conduct to come and present his views at the Council of Constance. What John Paul II would ultimately be apollogizing for would not be so much that as a heritic he was burned at the stake. After all that was common practice by the civil governments of the times. It was the fact that the safe conduct was violated.


#20

I think it could be you are putting too much importance on the differences in cultures (traditions, etc.) between then and now… Human nature never really changes…
There are evils going on now in the Church that, while not on the level of physically burning someone @ the stake, are, nonetheless, inexcusable for people calling themselves Christian.
some people FEEL that THEY are being “burned” … in light of how some of them are treated - by people professing to be Christian. I have found many in the Church today to be judgmental, cold, uncarig, self-righteous, etc… and this kind of thing drives people out of the Church.
It is a very serious thing to drive someone out of the Church… The Church is where Christ is found (though how he can stand to live in the midst of so much sin is beyond me :eek: ).
the Church is where his true doctrines are found (etc)… If someone is out of the Church, he/she has no access to the power that eminates from Her…Power over sin and satan…
Like i say, some things never change…
I believe most people who leave the Church do so over PEOPle, and their un-Christian ways, not over doctrines and teachings (although those are the reasons often given…).
Anyway, God bless…


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