Who writes the prayers of the faithful?


#1

Are these standard prayers that come from the diocese or from the parish priest himself?

The reason I ask is that for 3 weeks now, we have heard something along the lines of “May our elected leaders be dedicated to PEACE and JUSTICE,” or tonight it was about the election, “May our election results display our concern for PEACE AND JUSTICE.”

Not a word about LIFE. But lots and lots of PEACE AND JUSTICE.

I was going to ask the priest tonight but he’s not the pastor and I don’t want to be seen to be confrontational.

Why don’t we hear about protecting LIFE before we hear about PEACE AND JUSTICE???

:mad:


#2

It depends on the parish. There may be an individual who has this assignment or there may be a committee that develops them. There are commercial services that provide a booklet with the prayers. For certain RCIA rites there are prayers included in the rite itself.

There is a format that they are to follow. From the GIRM:

  1. The series of intentions is usually to be:

a) for the needs of the Church;

b) for public authorities and the salvation of the whole world;

c) for those burdened by any kind of difficulty;

d) for the local community.

Nevertheless, in any particular celebration, such as a Confirmation, a Marriage, or at a Funeral, the series of intentions may be concerned more closely with the particular occasion.


#3

[quote="TheRealJuliane, post:1, topic:304015"]
Are these standard prayers that come from the diocese or from the parish priest himself?

The reason I ask is that for 3 weeks now, we have heard something along the lines of "May our elected leaders be dedicated to PEACE and JUSTICE," or tonight it was about the election, "May our election results display our concern for PEACE AND JUSTICE."

Not a word about LIFE. But lots and lots of PEACE AND JUSTICE.

I was going to ask the priest tonight but he's not the pastor and I don't want to be seen to be confrontational.

Why don't we hear about protecting LIFE before we hear about PEACE AND JUSTICE???

:mad:

[/quote]

Justice could mean, Justice for the unborn.

Anyway, in our parish, one of our deacons is in charge of the intentions, based on the GIRM guidelines.


#4

I recall in grade school our class would write them sometimes. We may have been given a subject but a number of children would volunteer, write them, and then they would be approved for the particular mass. ;)


#5

[quote="twopekinguys, post:3, topic:304015"]
Justice could mean, Justice for the unborn.

Anyway, in our parish, one of our deacons is in charge of the intentions, based on the GIRM guidelines.

[/quote]

But it doesn't mean that. The unborn are mentioned once a year, on the anniversary or the Sunday closest to the anniversary of Roe v. Wade. That's it. Forget about any of the other non-negotiables.


#6

[quote="TheRealJuliane, post:5, topic:304015"]
But it doesn't mean that. The unborn are mentioned once a year, on the anniversary or the Sunday closest to the anniversary of Roe v. Wade. That's it. Forget about any of the other non-negotiables.

[/quote]

Injustice is when you deny someone something that is theirs by right. All sin is injustice.

As an example, adultery is injustice because it deprives a spouse of fidelity, which is his or hers by right. Murder and abortion are injustice because it deprives a person of life which is theirs by right. And so forth.

Some believe that social justice can be segregated from issues of personal morality, but they cannot. They are inexorably linked. There is no social justice without personal morality and there is no personal morality without social justice. Justice and morality rise and fall together. When you pray for peace and justice, you are praying that killing stops and that people be given what is theirs by right, including the right to life from conception to natural death. When you pray for peace and justice, you are therefor praying for an end to abortion, and end to the death penalty, an end to euthanasia, an end to adultery, and an end to any other sin which deprives someone of something which is theirs by right.

A world which is perfectly just would have no sin because we would render to God what is God's by right, perfect trust, obedience and faithfulness. A world that is perfectly just would never have violence against anyone, including and especially the unborn. When you pray for justice, you pray for an end to sin.

Msgr Charles Pope has an excellent article on the topic at blog.adw.org/2012/09/recovering-a-wider-sense-of-justice/

-Tim-


#7

The deacon is to bring the prayers to the altar and as such he should write them especially when he is going to be at all the masses on his preaching rotation.

The reality is the secretary prints them out of a book that pastor probably subscribes or as directed by the chancery office.

Different books have different themes and may start to sound more like advocacy then prayer

God Bless


#8

Our music director was also our Liturgist and he wrote the prayers.

Maybe instead of questioning, it might be good to meditate on the prayers as they are presented.


#9

Also, check with the worship director of the parish.


#10

I do but it has been striking to me that in this parish, it is as if there is no such thing as a war upon the unborn. It does not surprise me any more. I always offer my prayers for the unborn during the private intentions but I would like to hear that coming from the pulpit.

I don’t think there has been anything about the attack on our religious freedom in this church either.


#11

[quote="TheRealJuliane, post:10, topic:304015"]
I do but it has been striking to me that in this parish, it is as if there is no such thing as a war upon the unborn. It does not surprise me any more. I always offer my prayers for the unborn during the private intentions but I would like to hear that coming from the pulpit.

I don't think there has been anything about the attack on our religious freedom in this church either.

[/quote]

Perhaps this Pastor is focused on delivering the Gospel. Perhaps it's a good thing to not be so focused on the world and be more focused on Christ. This seems to be where God has brought you. There could be a good reason.


#12

[quote="Julia_Mae, post:11, topic:304015"]
Perhaps this Pastor is focused on delivering the Gospel. Perhaps it's a good thing to not be so focused on the world and be more focused on Christ. This seems to be where God has brought you. There could be a good reason.

[/quote]

I'm in the process of leaving that parish, actually. I do Adoration, confession and daily Mass at my home parish. It's just that my husband prefers our old parish. We should have been at the other parish all along but at the time I reverted, I didn't know that. :shrug:


#13

One of our intentions that is read each week is for the fostering of respect for the sacredness of life in our society from conception until natural death


#14

Exactly. :thumbsup:

Just because something isn’t specifically mentioned, doesn’t mean it isn’t intended.


#15

[quote="TheRealJuliane, post:12, topic:304015"]
I'm in the process of leaving that parish, actually. I do Adoration, confession and daily Mass at my home parish. It's just that my husband prefers our old parish. We should have been at the other parish all along but at the time I reverted, I didn't know that. :shrug:

[/quote]

Juliane, maybe for the sake of your husband, who has been coming to Mass without his own faith for years, you should continue going to the parish he prefers? If I am speaking out of turn, please forgive me.

In answer to your question, the prayers of the faithful at that parish are probably from the service the pastor subscribes to.


#16

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