Why be Protestant? I would like to know

Hi,

This is to the Protestants who often visit this forum.

Why be Protestant? I would like to know.

Peace

[quote=dennisknapp]Hi,

This is to the Protestants who often visit this forum.

Why be Protestant? I would like to know.

Peace
[/quote]

I suppose the answer would be different for different people.

But in my case I wanted to attend a church where the gospel of Jesus Christ was preached, where there was fellowship among the members of the Congregation in the Holy Spirit, and where Jesus Christ was worshiped enthusiastically.

My experience being raised as a Catholic was of an emphasis on the outward conformity of religion. No Catholics of my acquaintance, either family or friend, ever read the Bible, spoke of the importance of Jesus Christ to them, spoke of what the Holy Spirit was doing in their lives, or ever witnessed to anyone on the importance of being saved.

So feeling that these things were indicators of an unhealthy (or dead) faith, I decided to seek out people that had an open and enthusiastic Christian testimony. Maybe it’s just a function of where I live, but the ‘Fundamentalists’ outstrip the Catholics in the enthusiasm department.

My experience with the Catholic church was of dead, repetitious, ritual. No fire, no desire, no fellowship, no Bible study, no evidence of the Holy Spirit at work. The only time there was ever anyone new in the congregation was when a new family moved into town. But at least the Mass never went more than 45 minutes.

Peace

[quote=EA_Man]I suppose the answer would be different for different people.

But in my case I wanted to attend a church where the gospel of Jesus Christ was preached, where there was fellowship among the members of the Congregation in the Holy Spirit, and where Jesus Christ was worshiped enthusiastically.

My experience being raised as a Catholic was of an emphasis on the outward conformity of religion. No Catholics of my acquaintance, either family or friend, ever read the Bible, spoke of the importance of Jesus Christ to them, spoke of what the Holy Spirit was doing in their lives, or ever witnessed to anyone on the importance of being saved.

So feeling that these things were indicators of an unhealthy (or dead) faith, I decided to seek out people that had an open and enthusiastic Christian testimony. Maybe it’s just a function of where I live, but the ‘Fundamentalists’ outstrip the Catholics in the enthusiasm department.

My experience with the Catholic church was of dead, repetitious, ritual. No fire, no desire, no fellowship, no Bible study, no evidence of the Holy Spirit at work. The only time there was ever anyone new in the congregation was when a new family moved into town. But at least the Mass never went more than 45 minutes.

Peace
[/quote]

Have you been challenged by those on these boards who are Catholic? Do we fit your previous understanding of what “Catholics” are?

The reason I ask is that I am a former Protestant who came into the Church in 2001. I attended a very energized Evangelical church before I entered the Catholic Church. I know what you mean about the lack of energy in the Church, but there is also beauty and a transcendence I never experienced as a Protestant.

Plus, the way we worship is very simular to how Jews and the early Christian worshipped. Our worship informs us of our connection to the early Church and Judaism. It also informs us of the promise made by Christ that the gates of hell will never prevail against His Church.

Peace

Hi,

This is to the Protestants who often visit this forum.

Why be Protestant? I would like to know.

Peace

Perhaps because Protestants are often raised Protestant and it just doesn’t occur to everyone to check out Catholicism.

[quote=Curious]Perhaps because Protestants are often raised Protestant and it just doesn’t occur to everyone to check out Catholicism.
[/quote]

Particularly if they inherit a legacy of superiority over Catholics.

My best friend growing up, lived two doors apart in south Chicago suburb from 1960-1981 (ages 1-22) was Lutheran and his mom often made anti-Catholic remarks, so much as to have us kids say the Our Father together, saying she bets he knows more of it. Then when we said it and he continued into the doxology, she smiled, having proven her case that the Catholic Our Father was was not up to Lutheran standards. I also remember going to church with them once, and I was weirding out because I think they had kneeling rails, and I said, I thought Lutherans didn’t kneel during Mass. :confused: She said, “we don’t. We sit forward.” :mad:

Oh. :ehh:

Anyway I’m not here to bash Lutherans or her in particular, because I loved her very much and she was very good to me.

My point is that children raised in that environment might have a rough time hearing the Church call from the distance.

Alan

I would say people go to churches that they personally like. Many women are emotional and so desire the Pentecostal church where outward emotion can be released, especially in verbal praise to the Lord and singing praise hymns which are beautiful and easy to sing.

                    Some folks want to learn more on just **what** the bible means, rather than just hearing it read to them in parts. So they seek a church which preaches the bible and gives an interpretation of that particular chapter. Either from the pulpit or in an adult Sunday School class. Sad to say, one could spend a life time in a Catholic church and hear the bible read to them in the 1st and 2nd readings, as well as the gospel reading and never really have the texts fully explained as to what it means. This is really sad and priests need to be instructors in the word and not just give 10 minute "feel good" orientations". Also there should be weekly bible study groups where adults should attend.

                    Evangelical churches are one up on the Catholic churches for reaching the desires of why people seek to come to church. They teach them the bible, even though their interpretation may be lacking. Also the hymns are easier to sing and people actually greet you at the door and within the church. But evangelical churches also "entertain" the audience, rather than just dwelling on the adoration of Christ. They bring in professional gospel singing groups and motivating "revival" speakers, who know how to fire up the crowd.

                     I've been through it all and seen it all. But when it comes down to reality, only your relationship with Christ matters. Not what some church says you** must** do to "get it right". I personally am very conservative and like the "quiet" service. If I were Protestant, I would associate with the Lutherans or United Methodists. Like I said, it's where your **personality** fits. That's my two cents worth.

[quote=dennisknapp]Have you been challenged by those on these boards who are Catholic? Do we fit your previous understanding of what “Catholics” are?

The reason I ask is that I am a former Protestant who came into the Church in 2001. I attended a very energized Evangelical church before I entered the Catholic Church. I know what you mean about the lack of energy in the Church, but there is also beauty and a transcendence I never experienced as a Protestant.

Plus, the way we worship is very simular to how Jews and the early Christian worshipped. Our worship informs us of our connection to the early Church and Judaism. It also informs us of the promise made by Christ that the gates of hell will never prevail against His Church.

Peace
[/quote]

I have been pleasantly surprised by some posts and personalities here.

But I have come to the conclusion that it is whether or not you are in Christ and He in you that determines your salvation. With that in mind I believe that there are believers in many denominations that make up the Body of Christ.

And in reply to some other posts here: It is often the case as well that people don’t hear the call of “the Church” because of the Catholics or Christians in their own families.

It has been my personal experience that the Evangelicals do “the heavy lifting” in terms of witnessing to and evangelizing the ‘unsaved’. Don’t get me wrong, I’m not knocking Catholics and there are alot of Protestants who are satisfied with once a week church attendence and “witnessing with their lives”, all I’m saying is that pound for pound the Fundamentalists are more committed to speading the Gospel.

Peace

I think the term “Protestant” only really applies to the original protesters or reformers (depending on your perspective). For the majority of folks who grew up in a particular church, they’ve never known anything else. They didn’t protest anything and haven’t even made a deliberate choice . . . they just kept going where they’ve always gone. A few generations in and pretty soon, no one remembers the “protest”.

David

[quote=justcatholic]I would say people go to churches that they personally like. Many women are emotional and so desire the Pentecostal church where outward emotion can be released, especially in verbal praise to the Lord and singing praise hymns which are beautiful and easy to sing.
[/quote]

Pentecostal churches are the fastest growing churches in the world because of the Baptism of the Holy Spirit. Dynamic worship is just a by-product of that Baptism and work of God. Attempting to relegate it to just an emotional experience that draws emotional people is in accurate portrayal. People never go to a Pentecostal church just for the worship. The theology and practices are just too different from liturgical or evangelical churches to make that a likelihood.

David

[quote=dennisknapp]Hi,

This is to the Protestants who often visit this forum.

Why be Protestant? I would like to know.

Peace
[/quote]

I dunno. :bowdown2: Maybe people like worshiping with guitars and drums people jumping up and down getting thier :clapping: days worth of exercise is why.:dancing:

As I remarked on another thread, I personally am grateful for Protestants.

I was a cradle Catholic, but pretty much blew off the Church when I went to college, and never went after moving to Wichita in 1981.

In 1983 I spent two months in Seattle for Boeing and I was looking for a place to practice my piano music and voice lessons. I wandered over to a Presbyterian church across the street from my motel. It seemed deserted so I started playing a piano I found in an empty room. The janitor caught me and invited me to join their choir and play piano solo for them at service. I agreed, and they gave me a key to the church so I could come in at night anytime and practice piano or singing in the school or sanctuary. I got to wear a robe and sing in their choir, and even got to do a “barbershop quartet” type song once with the pastor and two other dudes. They made me feel incredibly welcome, and trusting me with a key after knowing me less than a week was really helpful to me. I was taking voice lessons from Maestro David Kyle on Alki point. If I’d stayed in Seattle I just might have kept going to that church.

I came home eventually. I have more stories of How Non-Catholics Have Helped Me during troubled times where they nearly could have tempted me away.

Now I get to play piano and organ for Mass at two different Catholic churches every week. I love music. Let’s face it; music can be very powerful and some people might just not share my thrill at hearing “Come Holy Ghost” on Pentecost with full pipe organ.

Alan

[quote=Cormier6083]I dunno. :bowdown2: Maybe people like worshiping with guitars and drums people jumping up and down getting thier :clapping: days worth of exercise is why.:dancing:
[/quote]

There’s a lot to be said for that.

Charismatic Catholic meetings tend to cater toward this thirst in Catholics, which I think may simulate the atmosphere in some Protestant services. I’ve only been to one, in Wichita, many years ago but it was great. The meeting ended in Mass being said by bishop Eugene Gerber. The Mass itself was not jazzed up in any way because there were a lot of conservatives there, including Gerber and concelebrants.

Alan

[quote=EA_Man] all I’m saying is that pound for pound the Fundamentalists are more committed to speading the Gospel.

Peace
[/quote]

You mean in America, right? Not the rest of the world? In Africa the fastest growing Church is the Catholic Church. Don’t forget China and India, as well. Fundamentalism, to which you are refering, is more an American phenomenon, and Catholics living in the U.S. only make 5% of the world’s Catholic population.

Peace

[quote=DavidB]Pentecostal churches are the fastest growing churches in the world because of the Baptism of the Holy Spirit. Dynamic worship is just a by-product of that Baptism and work of God. Attempting to relegate it to just an emotional experience that draws emotional people is in accurate portrayal. People never go to a Pentecostal church just for the worship. The theology and practices are just too different from liturgical or evangelical churches to make that a likelihood.

David
[/quote]

What do you mean by “baptism of the Holy Spirit?”

How can Penecostalism be the work of God when many of their doctrines stand against the true Christian faith, ie belief in the Trinity. God would not pour His Spirit on those who would deny His true nature.

Peace

Other Catholics might be interested in this idea I just had about protestants – especially if we think it’s our job to “bring them home” which I’m not sure is our primary job anyway.

Think about the prodigal son story. (Luke 15) The older son was obedient; the younger son took off from home and blew his father’s money on prostitutes.

When the younger son came back, it was because he blew everything and came back crawling like a pathetic bug. The older son quite righteously protested why were we celebrating for this pathetic lost (i.e. loser) brother more then we ever had for him, who has been obedient. :confused:

The father agreed that the older son was objectively more obedient. The father loves his son, and all the father has is the sons. That said, right now the big party is about this creature coming back. Sure he just came for a morsel of table scraps and may not be ready for the Full Meal Deal right away. That’s why the older son is an important member of the family (body). What’s important isn’t why he came back or whose fault we blame his condition on, but that he is back. We welcome, and party. Later we will get him showered and try to teach him a few manners to help him get by in the palace.

Alan

[quote=DavidB]…People never go to a Pentecostal church just for the worship. The theology and practices are just too different from liturgical or evangelical churches to make that a likelihood.

[/quote]

wrong…ding…thanks for playing anyways…lol. actually, most “pentecostals” don’t even completely understand their own theology and where it came from. and most do attend because of the worship style. once they are sucked into the radical behavior and become a part of it, the experience keeps them in. they do not generally become penetacostal because of some great theological revelation…it is usually because of some personal experience which we all know can sometimes be deceiving.

[quote=dennisknapp]You mean in America, right? Not the rest of the world? In Africa the fastest growing Church is the Catholic Church. Don’t forget China and India, as well. Fundamentalism, to which you are refering, is more an American phenomenon, and Catholics living in the U.S. only make 5% of the world’s Catholic population.

Peace
[/quote]

Yes in America.

But that does raise an interesting question. Why isn’t Catholicism the fastest growing church in the US as well?

Peace

[quote=bengal_fan]most “pentecostals” don’t even completely understand their own theology and where it came from.
[/quote]

And this is different from the garden variety Cradle Catholic…how?

Peace

All you who have been baptized into Christ, have put on Christ. Alleluia!

smileys.smileycentral.com/cat/8/8_3_15.gif

[quote=EA_Man]And this is different from the garden variety Cradle Catholic…how?

Peace
[/quote]

The garden variety cradle Catholic has very subdued behavior. Very stiff, like at a military funeral, at all times. This is their cloaking device against anyone thinking they aren’t sufficiently pious at any given time. All their lives, especially in Catholic school, they have been taught that it is not just what’s in your heart but what others think of you that determines whether you get whacked. One false move and you will be called names and warned of your direct path to hell, punished, banished or Thought Of As A Free Thinker.

Converts aren’t like this. You don’t figure anybody takes on that persona on purpose. :stuck_out_tongue:

Alan

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