Why Colin Kaepernick Didn’t Stand for the National Anthem


#1

I commend and support Colin Kaepernick.

When the national anthem played before the start of the preseason game with the Green Bay Packers on Friday night, Colin Kaepernick, the quarterback for the San Francisco 49ers, took a stand by not standing.

Explaining the gesture, Kaepernick said that he had decided to remain seated as a statement against racial oppression.

“I am not going to stand up to show pride in a flag for a country that oppresses black people and people of color,” he told NFL Media in an interview published on Saturday.

“To me, this is bigger than football and it would be selfish on my part to look the other way,” he said.

nytimes.com/2016/08/28/sports/football/colin-kaepernick-national-anthem-49ers-stand.html

I remember John Carlos, Tommie Smith, and Peter Norman too!


#2

I think it’s a case of another overly entitled jerk self identifying. I have to admit to being so much less excited about the upcoming football season, in part due to behavior like this.


#3

This, pretty much


#4

That is the great thing about America, people can do whatever foolish thing they want to do. And others are free to respond or not respond as they wish. Somehow, not standing for the national anthem is likely to be more frowned upon in North Korea.


#5

Apparently he is not so oppressed that he refuses to play the sport and earn money for doing so in this oppressive country though. :rolleyes:

As if not standing is going to make the country less oppressive. Maybe he should try to do something more than he is doing.


#6

You are accusing Colin Kaepernick of the wrong thing. It is not about him; it is about other blacks who are effectively disenfranchised and discriminated against by law enforcement and criminal justice. Would you even notice, much less care, if it was some black person in Compton who did a similar thing?

Standing up and taking a challenging position is a courageous act as he exposed himself to criticism and scorn.

Kaepernick already articulated his reason for not standing. Perhaps people can respond by demonstrating the criminal justice system isn’t biased against African Americans. Moreover, they can show how the people died for the flag really died for our freedom and liberty. I really do not see a connection between the Vietnam, Afghanistan, and the Iraq War with my personal freedom, or with any other covert CIA action or US geopolitical stance.

Would people call Peter Norman, John Carlos, and Tommie Smith entitled?


#7

However, today we see a black man as President of the USA. There is discrimination today, but many groups have to face it. For example, asians must have much higher scores to enter a college or university, than anyone else. Poor whites who have been raised in poverty face difficulties and in most cases they do not qualify for affirmative action. The American Indian has been brutalised and killed off in huge numbers in one of the worst genocides in the history of the world. The wage gap between the rich CEO and the average worker has been increasing.


#8

Yeah. Exactly.

Something important even. Like being a good example, maybe? :rolleyes:


#9

Isn’t Kaepernick being a good example by putting himself on the line and exposing himself to criticism?

Why don’t people articulate why they disagree with Kaepernick?


#10

Good point. Most people tend to identify with their own group and thus view oppression as it pertains mainly to their in-group.


#11

What example is he giving exactly?

I did articulate. I said he should **do **something. Get out in the community and work to change things, or teach things. Don’t just not stand and expect that to be enough. No, sorry. That doesn’t do anything, in my opinion.


#12

You know your are right in a way. Colin Kaepernick signed a $114,000,000 contract (6 yr) with the San Francisco 49ers. A lot of poor whites would be happy to have a (6 yr) contract which was one percent of that. Policemen, firemen, soldiers, teachers, factory workers, gardeners, rubbish collectors, janitors, people working at Walmart, MacDonalds, Burger King, etc., don’t make anything near that amount.


#13

He continued, “If they take football away, my endorsements from me, I know that I stood up for what is right.”

:confused:Why can’t he be proactive and just leave the NFL, stop working for the Man and taking all those filthy American dollars? I noticed the team stood (sat) behind him, as If I need another reason to be anti-SF, hoping they finish in the gutter again.


#14

Most people who are not a professional athlete would not even direct any attention to those issues. Again, it is not about Colin Kaepernick!

Kaepernick deserves every penny of that contract, since the NFL is a lucrative enterprise and the players who drawn in the revenue should be compensate commensurate with the value they bring in. Well, we could also make the NFL publicly owned, and make it a public good as opposed to a commercial enterprise. But the Player’s Union and Kapernick’s agent’s job is to ensure that his interests are represented within the current system of the NFL. One of those interests is to secure a fair share of the revenue that the 49ers and the NFL generates for their principals.

What good would that do for Kaepernick or for the cause he advocates for? How could dissociating with money and fame be of benefit to anyone?


#15

Easy. Standing for the national anthem is a sign of respect for one’s country. A person who is so brutish, so boorish, that he is unwilling to give even a token of respect for the country that has made his lifestyle possible deserves zero respect, as does the team that he plays on. He is a symbol of ill-manners and rude behavior. He has shown a disregard for America, then it is only fitting that all in America treat him with an equal amount of disdain, showing him no more respect than he was willing to give everyone else.


#16

I guess you would say the same about John Carlos and Tommie Smith.


#17

None at all. But what he did will be worse than nothing. He will bring disrepute to the team that backed him and the city he represents, not that SF needed any help in that regard.


#18

I never met them.


#19

Look them up.

It seems that people would be happy with a Colin Kaepernick who says “screw you, I have mine!”


#20

Anyone else see the hypocrisy of this guy’s statements? An NFL player,with the potential of earning mega bucks,living in a country with a black president ,yet he makes this statement?Sounds like an spoiled brat to me!:cool:


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