Why consummate marriage?


#1

What are the sacramental and canonical reasons for consummating a marriage? Why must a marriage be consummated before it is a valid marriage? What inner reality does this outward action manifest?


#2

[quote="atassina, post:1, topic:295113"]
What are the sacramental and canonical reasons for consummating a marriage? Why must a marriage be consummated before it is a valid marriage? What inner reality does this outward action manifest?

[/quote]

It doesn't have to be consummated to be valid, but if you don't consummate it it can be dissolved.


#3

Why? What is the deeper meaning behind consummation?


#4

[quote="atassina, post:3, topic:295113"]
Why? What is the deeper meaning behind consummation?

[/quote]

Perhaps because it is the final action towards a very open and shared 'yes' to God.

Until the consumation, there has not been any action that testifies to openess to life.

Sure there is a vow. But we all know actions are much louder then words. Even those words said before God and the witnesses.


#5

To pretend that sexual relations is not a part of marriage is absurd. The human pair bond is a normal biological function. Marriage as a sacrament elevates the human biological pair bond to a spiritual one.

Marriage on a human level is a formalized recognition of the human pair bond. The government is involved with marriage because more often than not married people have children. The government looks after the interest of wives and children in the event that a husband wants to leave them.

If a married couple has no intention of being a pair then the marriage is a fraud.

One of the requirements for a sacramental marriage is that the two people involved intend to get married. A sure sign that two people don’t intend to be married is to not engage in marital relations.


#6

The Josephite marriage has a long tradition within the Church. These are marriages where the spouses have no intention of consummating the marriage.

HOWEVER, it is understood that if either spouse changes his mind, then the consummation must take place as each spouse has a right to the marital embrace.

Canon 1135 Each spouse has an equal obligation and right to whatever pertains to the partnership of conjugal life.


#7

[quote="atassina, post:1, topic:295113"]
What are the sacramental and canonical reasons for consummating a marriage? Why must a marriage be consummated before it is a valid marriage? What inner reality does this outward action manifest?

[/quote]

God is a creative God and he has chose to share part of that creative nature with his creation. Sexual reproduction is the means by which humans co-create with God.

Marriage has long been the human institution that formalizes the right of couples to participate in the creation of new humans. Christian marriage makes that institution a sacrament.

Until a couple consummates the marriage the couple is not objectively engaging in the purpose of marriage. (Note that even an infertile couple is objectively engaging in procreative activity when having sexual relations.)


#8

If a marriage is never consummated, what makes it different than a good friendship? That is why it can be annulled if never consummated.


#9

[quote="WingsOfEagles, post:8, topic:295113"]
If a marriage is never consummated, what makes it different than a good friendship? That is why it can be annulled if never consummated.

[/quote]

It is different because it is a sacrament and sacramental graces are received.

An unconsummated marriage cannot be annulled if it is valid. But it can be dissolved by the Pope.

See: catholic.nowealthbutlife.com/valid-consummated/


#10

[quote="Evan, post:9, topic:295113"]
It is different because it is a sacrament and sacramental graces are received.

An unconsummated marriage cannot be annulled if it is valid. But it can be dissolved by the Pope.

See: catholic.nowealthbutlife.com/valid-consummated/

[/quote]

Interesting.


#11

Marriage is a covenant.

The consummation of a marriage is the final step in sealing the covenant. Blood is shed.


#12

[quote="Little_Mary, post:11, topic:295113"]
Marriage is a covenant.

The consummation of a marriage is the final step in sealing the covenant. Blood is shed.

[/quote]

HUH? Blood is not always shed, and in any case was not always required to seal a covenant.


#13

[quote="atassina, post:1, topic:295113"]
What are the sacramental and canonical reasons for consummating a marriage? Why must a marriage be consummated before it is a valid marriage? What inner reality does this outward action manifest?

[/quote]

Hello,

If you buy a house, would you not live in it? Or, a car, and not drive it? The marital contract/covenant is a conjugal one and it is completed when the goods (the bodies) are exchanged. Before this exchange, the contract is still "valid" just as you bought the car even before you drove it off the lot.

Dan


#14

A sacramental marriage must be consummated to be indissoluble, even though it is valid.

It is through the conjugal act that a man and women become one flesh. Genesis 2:24, also:
Matthew 19:5 "For this cause shall a man leave father and mother, and shall cleave to his wife, and they two shall be in one flesh."
Mark 10:8 "And they two shall be in one flesh."
1 Corinthians 6:16 “Or know you not, that he who is joined to a harlot, is made one body ? For they shall be, saith he, two in one flesh.”

Applicable canons, CIC:Canon 1061.1 A valid marriage between baptised persons is said to be merely ratified, if it is not consummated; ratified and consummated, if the spouses have in a human manner engaged together in a conjugal act in itself apt for the generation of offspring. To this act marriage is by its nature ordered and by it the spouses become one flesh. Canon 1061.2 If the spouses have lived together after the celebration of their marriage, consummation is presumed until the contrary is proven.

Canon 1141 A marriage which is ratified and consummated cannot be dissolved by any human power or by any cause other than death.
Canon 1142 A non-consummated marriage between baptised persons or between a baptised party and an unbaptised party can be dissolved by the Roman Pontiff for a just reason, at the request of both parties or of either party, even if the other is unwilling.


#15

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