Why did GM take so long to respond to deadly defect? Corporate culture may hold answer


#1

washingtonpost.com/business/economy/why-did-gm-take-so-long-to-respond-to-deadly-defect-corporate-culture-may-hold-answer/2014/03/30/5c366f6c-b691-11e3-b84e-897d3d12b816_story.html?hpid=z4


#2

All I did was read the article and at first I was thinking that an electrical defect can be difficult to diagnose and also I was thinking that perhaps GM really wasn’t aware of a problem with the “ignition switch”
seemed to me if the car starts and is operable, how is there a perceptible problem with it?

Anyway, finally I read in the very long article two thirds of the way down the following:

washingtonpost.com/business/economy/why-did-gm-take-so-long-to-respond-to-deadly-defect-corporate-culture-may-hold-answer/2014/03/30/5c366f6c-b691-11e3-b84e-897d3d12b816_story.html?hpid=z4

[quote]GM has said it discovered the switch problem in a pre-production Saturn as early as 2001 but thought the problem had been addressed. Then, in 2004, company engineers reported that the switch could turn off if accidentally hit by a driver’s knee.

[/quote]

A car can be turned off accidently by a child (did that to my father’s old 47 Plymouth when I was 4 years old);
So how is that GM’s fault if the driver somehow turn’s off the ignition switch with his or her knee?
Don’t get me wrong, I’m assuming that by adding torque is meant making the key more difficult to turn and I don’t even understand now if the problem is at all a failed (on its own) ignition switch;
But I can understand how GM could not feel obligated to do a recall if the ignition switch were somehow being manually turned off.

PS:
After ~12 years on my own in the building trades, I got hired by General Motors in 1979 for my talents as a fork lift operator, except I spent most of my employ there as a window trimmer …
Had no insurance on my own and GM’s plan is quite good.

rex


#3

I owned a 2007 chevrolet colorado pickup that also had ignition problems. You never knew when it would start.
There was never a recall. It comes down to money at the expense of consumer safety. That is my opinion.


#4

I guess I sort of understand why, but then I go back to when cars weren’t very perfect and we were not as litigious as we are today. I have bumped an ignition a time or two and lost power steering. It was one thing we used to train for in driver’s ed, along with a few other emergency procedures. I never have had my hood fly up due to a faulty latch, but that was really one we trained as well. There was an expectation that these things could happen.


#5

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