Why did God the Father announce Jesus as his Beloved Son in Matthew 17?


#1

I have been thinking why God the Father announces Jesus as his beloved son, just when St. Peter speaks about making 3 Tabernacles.

Was it because St. Peter spoke about making Tabernacles (as it seems Peter didn’t know what he was saying) or because it happened to be just before the Feast of the Tabernacles?

One reason I ask this is that the last time Peter spoke was when he proclaimed Jesus was the Christ, Son of the Living God and Jesus reveals that it was his Father than inspired Peter to say it.

But this time when Peter speaks, the Father actually speaks! (as opposed to no one hearing in Matthew 16!)

Thoughts?

MJ


#2

I think this was announced by the Father in anticipation of the sacrifice of His only begotten Son.


#3

Thank you for your input.

Yes this is what is pointed out by Bible commentaries which I’ve seen as well.

It is also interesting (upon my own reflection) that in Matthew 16 after Peter said Jesus is the Christ etc Jesus points out that he must “suffer greviously into the hands of men and and die subsequently then and that he must be killed and on the third day be raised to life” tell anyone he IS the Christ".

So Upon further analysis what is the difference between this :" Don’t tell anyone what you have seen, until the Son of Man has been raised from the dead.” When Jesus came down with PJ and J?

Were the rest of the Apostles privy to this instruction by Jesus at that point before what eventually transpired? If not, why not?

Hope I’m not making a mountain out of a molehill:o

MJ


#4

I don’t think I’ve heard anyone refer to the tents Peter offered to build as tabernacles, but I can see how one could interpret it that way. During the transfiguration Moses and Elijah appeared, two Old Testament figures who represent the law and the prophets, respectively. While Peter knew in his heart Jesus was the messiah and son of God, he was still Jewish and still uncertain of the role of Jesus. To the Jews the messiah was more of a political figure who would set the people free and establish a Jewish nation. Jesus was more than that, but lowly fisherman Peter did not quite understand. Peter offers to build three equal tents indicating that he still believes Moses and Elijah are equal to Jesus. Then, because Peter clearly needs to hear it from God, from above God points out that Jesus and only Jesus is his son.

This is actually one of my favorite passages in the Gospels because it is evidence that the Gospels are not works of fiction. Why would three authors trying to make up a story for everyone to believe in a fictional messiah make the transfiguration such a small part? They could have just as easily said all 12 apostles saw him transfigure or 72 disciples or even 5,000 followers. It’s not like anyone could proven it didn’t happen around thousands of followers. Heck, if Jesus was preaching on a hill with the sun to his back it could probably make him look divine, so it could have been easy to convince thousands of followers Jesus just transfigured in front of their eyes. Instead, this event took place away from everyone. So either Matthew, Mark, and Luke were writing a true event or they had a funny why of boasting about the divinity of their fictional messiah.


#5

Matthew portrays Jesus as the new Moses.

[LIST]
*]The Gospel of Matthew is made up of discourses or sub-books to mirror the five Jewish books of the law in the Old Testament.
*]Moses gave the law. Jesus gave the new law.
*]Moses accomplished an exodus from slavery in Egypt and Jesus accomplished an exodus from the slavery of sin.
*]Moses met and spoke with God on the mountain ad his face glowed so that he had to wear a veil and Jesus was transfigured to blazing white on the mountain where God spoke.
*]Etc.
[/LIST]

Matthew wrote to Jewish audience. Moses and the exodus were the central events in Jewish history. Matthew wished to portray Jesus as the new Moses and so the mount of transfiguration for Jesus is like Mt. Sinai for Moses.

Mt. Sinai is where God commissioned Moses as the lawgiver and told the people to listen to Moses. The mount of transfiguration is where God the Father told the Apostles to listen to the new lawgiver, Jesus.

-Tim-


#6

Yes. That’s the thing no mention I can find either. That’s also why I asked the question because im sure everything else (that is not unique to this part of scripture) has been covered. I find the sequence (that it is after Peter spoke) very fascinating so brought it up. :smiley:

During the transfiguration Moses and Elijah appeared, two Old Testament figures who represent the law and the prophets, respectively. While Peter knew in his heart Jesus was the messiah and son of God, he was still Jewish and still uncertain of the role of Jesus. To the Jews the messiah was more of a political figure who would set the people free and establish a Jewish nation. Jesus was more than that, but lowly fisherman Peter did not quite understand.

That is certainly true as I think about as well. I agree. Peter doesn’t know enough yet.

Peter offers to build three equal tents indicating that he still believes Moses and Elijah are equal to Jesus. Then, because Peter clearly needs to hear it from God, from above God points out that Jesus and only Jesus is his son.

Right! I wager that since Peter was going to be head of the Apostles, God the Father in a way makes sure Peter doesn’t go too far to lose focus on what the Son is really there for. After all his Son will appoint Peter in an amazing way as we see in John 21 (feed my sheep…). What say you?

This is actually one of my favorite passages in the Gospels because it is evidence that the Gospels are not works of fiction. Why would three authors trying to make up a story for everyone to believe in a fictional messiah make the transfiguration such a small part? They could have just as easily said all 12 apostles saw him transfigure or 72 disciples or even 5,000 followers. It’s not like anyone could proven it didn’t happen around thousands of followers. Heck, if Jesus was preaching on a hill with the sun to his back it could probably make him look divine, so it could have been easy to convince thousands of followers Jesus just transfigured in front of their eyes. Instead, this event took place away from everyone. So either Matthew, Mark, and Luke were writing a true event or they had a funny why of boasting about the divinity of their fictional messiah.

Thank you sir. Im with you on this! :cool:

MJ


#7

Hi Tim. Appreciate this. :thumbsup:

Interestingly Ive seen somewhere (unfortunately Im lousy at saving the links :o) where it mention there is connection between Peter and Moses!

I’ll look for it and get back if you don’t mind.

MJ


closed #8

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