Why did Luther leave?


#1

Alright, I need a little history lesson. Why did Martin Luther leave the Catholic Church? And if you know, could you possibly point me to a resource to look this up? I probably could’ve researched this myself, but I’m going to take the easy road!! Thanks :slight_smile:


Martin Luther: Similar to Judas?
#2

[quote=Goldy]Alright, I need a little history lesson. Why did Martin Luther leave the Catholic Church? And if you know, could you possibly point me to a resource to look this up? I probably could’ve researched this myself, but I’m going to take the easy road!! Thanks
[/quote]

Attention Mickey and Eden: here’s yet another ‘Luther’ post. Again, tis not I that is “obssesed with Luther.”

But anyway, hello Goldy-

Martin Luther din’t “leave”- he was fired because he wouldn’t tolerate the corruption going on.

The Pope sent one of his best theologians to demand Luther to recant his position on indulgences: Cardinal Cajetan. Luther refused. The Cardinal was well versed in Roman Catholic doctrine, and realized quickly the dilemma the Pope had: there was no adequate foundation to condemn Luther as a heretic. Why? Because ** there was not an official teaching on indulgences when Luther posted the 95 Theses**. There was no official doctrine as to the effect of the indulgence upon Purgatory.

So Cajetan knew that in order to put Luther down as a heretic, he must first be declared one according to some sort of doctrinal standard. Cajetan quickly drafted a declaration of dogma on the subject of indulgences. Pope Leo X found this to be a good idea. Thus came the decretal Cum postquam. The dogma of indulgences was defined as Cajetan outlined them. The Pope also threatened any of his representatives that may have held a divergent view on the subject.

Sometimes as we read history, we forget to do so existentially. Put yourself in Luther’s shoes. He spoke out against abuse, and was met by an Papal juggernaut that would not listen to him. He was, in effect betrayed by the superior spiritual authority of his day: the Roman Catholic Church held a mighty physical and (so he thought) spiritual power. They were supposed to protect the church, but rather had betrayed her by allowing the abuse of the indulgence.

Now, continue putting yourself in Luther’s shoes. Wouldn’t you begin to question other aspects of Roman Catholic power as well? Perhaps papal authority? Perhaps the authority of councils? Perhaps you knew that God had spoken truly and infallibly in His word, because the Holy Spirit regenerated your heart. Now, when you are faced with a system that claims to be speaking for God, would you not cling to the Bible as your sole authority? I’m beginning to preach, but I’m sure you get the idea. So of course, Luther continued to build strong opposition to the Papacy through his writings. By the time he was formally excommunicated, there were many writings of his disapproved of by the Papacy.

James Swan


#3

True, but you know James, you don’t* have* to answer every Luther thread.

TertiumQuid has given you his viewpoint but, as you came to “Catholic Answers”, I assume you would like a Catholic answer to your question as well. Please look at the other posts in this forum to learn more about Luther and the Catholic Church. Here is another source:

catholicculture.org/docs/doc_view.cfm?recnum=3423

To make a long story short, Luther began preaching beliefs that were in contradiction to the teachings of the Church. In an attempt to reign in his heretical teachings, Pope Leo X issued a Papal Bull called “Exsurge Domine” demanding that he desist. These are the first five false teachings of which he was accused:

Some of these errors we have decided to include in the present document; their substance is as follows:

  1. It is a heretical opinion, but a common one, that the sacraments of the New Law give pardoning grace to those who do not set up an obstacle.

  2. To deny that in a child after baptism sin remains is to treat with contempt both Paul and Christ.

  3. The inflammable sources of sin, even if there be no actual sin, delay a soul departing from the body from entrance into heaven.

  4. To one on the point of death imperfect charity necessarily brings with it great fear, which in itself alone is enough to produce the punishment of purgatory, and impedes entrance into the kingdom.

  5. That there are three parts to penance: contrition, confession, and satisfaction, has no foundation in Sacred Scripture nor in the ancient sacred Christian doctors.

The entire document can be read here:

ewtn.com/library/PAPALDOC/L10EXDOM.HTM

Luther burned the Bull and was excommunicated.


#4

[quote=Goldy]Alright, I need a little history lesson. Why did Martin Luther leave the Catholic Church? And if you know, could you possibly point me to a resource to look this up? I probably could’ve researched this myself, but I’m going to take the easy road!! Thanks :slight_smile:
[/quote]

Read Heiko Oberman, Luther: Man between God and the Devil.

The short answer is that Luther didn’t think he was leaving the Catholic Church. He thought that the papacy and the hierarchy were an antichristian, parasitic structure that had taken over the Church. He believed this mainly because, in his view, the papacy and the hierarchy were promoting a false Gospel that based salvation on good works and obedience to the Church’s regulations rather than on faith in the free promise of God in Christ. (It was not primarily about moral “corruption,” as TertiumQuid claims. Luther explicitly denied that this was his main concern.) Luther believed that he was called to proclaim the pure Gospel, and when various regional churches came to accept his teaching, he helped them organize their structures and liturgies so as to be more in keeping with the Gospel as he understood it. In that sense he came to “start his own church.”

Edwin


#5

Re: another Luther thread:

godrules.net/library/luther/luther.htm

:smiley:

Best,
reen12


#6

LUTHER ON THE EVE OF HIS REVOLT

by The Very Rev. M. J. Lagrange, O.P.

ewtn.com/library/CHISTORY/LUTHER.TXT

THE ROOTS OF THE REFORMATION

by Karl Adam

ewtn.com/library/CHISTORY/RTREF.TXT


#7

[quote=TertiumQuid]Attention Mickey and Eden: here’s yet another ‘Luther’ post. Again, tis not I that is “obssesed with Luther.”

But anyway, hello Goldy-

Martin Luther din’t “leave”- he was fired because he wouldn’t tolerate the corruption going on.

The Pope sent one of his best theologians to demand Luther to recant his position on indulgences: Cardinal Cajetan. Luther refused. The Cardinal was well versed in Roman Catholic doctrine, and realized quickly the dilemma the Pope had: there was no adequate foundation to condemn Luther as a heretic. Why? Because there was not an official teaching on indulgences when Luther posted the 95 Theses. There was no official doctrine as to the effect of the indulgence upon Purgatory.

So Cajetan knew that in order to put Luther down as a heretic, he must first be declared one according to some sort of doctrinal standard. Cajetan quickly drafted a declaration of dogma on the subject of indulgences. Pope Leo X found this to be a good idea. Thus came the decretal Cum postquam. The dogma of indulgences was defined as Cajetan outlined them. The Pope also threatened any of his representatives that may have held a divergent view on the subject.

Sometimes as we read history, we forget to do so existentially. Put yourself in Luther’s shoes. He spoke out against abuse, and was met by an Papal juggernaut that would not listen to him. He was, in effect betrayed by the superior spiritual authority of his day: the Roman Catholic Church held a mighty physical and (so he thought) spiritual power. They were supposed to protect the church, but rather had betrayed her by allowing the abuse of the indulgence.

Now, continue putting yourself in Luther’s shoes. Wouldn’t you begin to question other aspects of Roman Catholic power as well? Perhaps papal authority? Perhaps the authority of councils? Perhaps you knew that God had spoken truly and infallibly in His word, because the Holy Spirit regenerated your heart. Now, when you are faced with a system that claims to be speaking for God, would you not cling to the Bible as your sole authority? I’m beginning to preach, but I’m sure you get the idea. So of course, Luther continued to build strong opposition to the Papacy through his writings. By the time he was formally excommunicated, there were many writings of his disapproved of by the Papacy.

James Swan
[/quote]

Thus we have history.

Thank you, James.


#8

[quote=Eden]Luther burned the Bull.
[/quote]

“…the above penalties shall be burned publicly and solemnly…”

Done.


#9

Because the monastery ran out of beer?sorry,as somone with a foot in both the lutheran,and catholic church(lutheran-catholic marriage) i think these lutheran threads are in need of some lighthearted humor from time to time! in christian unity(with all baptized believers),celt


#10

[quote=Goldy]Alright, I need a little history lesson. Why did Martin Luther leave the Catholic Church? And if you know, could you possibly point me to a resource to look this up? I probably could’ve researched this myself, but I’m going to take the easy road!! Thanks :slight_smile:
[/quote]

This link may be more than you want, but I’ll let you decide:

newadvent.org/cathen/09438b.htm

As an aside to our Lutheran friends: just because someone asks a question about Luther, doesn’t necessarily mean that they are obsessed.


#11

As I recall Luther didn’t leave the Church, he got booted out. He was excommunicated for heresy?

What did Calvin and Zwingli think of Luther?
How close are Lutheran beliefs today to those of Luther?


#12

The simple answer is, he wanted to get married. As a Catholic priest it was not possible, that why Luther left.

In Christ,
selvaraj


#13

[quote=selvaraj]The simple answer is, he wanted to get married. As a Catholic priest it was not possible, that why Luther left.
In Christ,selvaraj
[/quote]

The simple answer is, in this case, not the correct one. This is a myth. It is widely believed, but a myth. Luther did, indeed, eventually marry. He did not leave the Catholic church for that reason, however.
Other posters have given you both Catholic & Protestant views, including several links. They are certain to contain a longer, & more accurate answer to this question.
God bless.


#14

[quote=Zooey]The simple answer is, in this case, not the correct one. This is a myth. It is widely believed, but a myth. Luther did, indeed, eventually marry. He did not leave the Catholic church for that reason, however.
Other posters have given you both Catholic & Protestant views, including several links. They are certain to contain a longer, & more accurate answer to this question.
God bless.
[/quote]

If Luther was not married I would had appreciated him. Secondly, Why did he remove few Books from the Bible? Bible says in Luke 16:17 But it is easier for heaven and earth to disappear than for the smallest detail of the Law to be done away with. Please read the original Catholic Bible.
In Christ,
selvaraj


#15

Selvaraj, thank you for your concern. I especially appreciate that you ended your post in the Holy Name of the Saviour.
I read the Bible daily, including the deuterocanonical books. Scripture is a rich source of inspiration to me in my Christian walk.
The question of which canon is the correct one has been a source of controversy amongst Christians for longer than either you or I have walked this earth. It will no doubt continue to be so. One view (Catholic) is that it is the Greek canon. The other view (held by most, but not all Protestants) is that it is the Hebrew canon. Luther clearly preferred the Hebrew canon. I, personally, find that there are compelling arguments for both views.
I simply wished to point out that, although widely believed among both Protestants & Catholics, Luther did not leave the Catholic church to marry. He had, in fact, been excommunicated before he ever met Katherina Von Bora.
God bless.


#16

The best book I have read on the subject is called, Between God and the Devil.


#17

[quote=Zooey]Selvaraj, thank you for your concern. I especially appreciate that you ended your post in the Holy Name of the Saviour.
I read the Bible daily, including the deuterocanonical books. Scripture is a rich source of inspiration to me in my Christian walk.
The question of which canon is the correct one has been a source of controversy amongst Christians for longer than either you or I have walked this earth. It will no doubt continue to be so. One view (Catholic) is that it is the Greek canon. The other view (held by most, but not all Protestants) is that it is the Hebrew canon. Luther clearly preferred the Hebrew canon. I, personally, find that there are compelling arguments for both views.
I simply wished to point out that, although widely believed among both Protestants & Catholics, Luther did not leave the Catholic church to marry. He had, in fact, been excommunicated before he ever met Katherina Von Bora.
God bless.
[/quote]

What I read about the different Bibles is that Luther found the Hebrew Canon worked more for backing up his beliefs. I read that both Hebrews and Christians used the same Bible for a long time until the Hebrews found it necessary to take a stand away from Christianity. Then they came up with their official set of books for the Bible. Prior to this there was no reason to make it official because there was no question about the inspired word of God.

So actually, the Hebrews decided that a few books would not be in their version. Then Martin Luther found that the Hebrew version was better suited to his needs.

Also, I read that Martin Luther was under the impression that once he became a priest all desires and temptations would fade. And when he found that he still had sexual desires for women he was appalled. He found that he could not overcome this and therefore he began to question the church. I wonder if it ever occurred to him that he had missed his calling. Perhaps he was called to the vocation of marriage and not the priesthood…

That’s just my take on some of the stuff I’ve read. By the way, I was raised in the Methodist church and converted to Catholicism 7 years ago. In the church I grew up in Martin Luther was a hero, but I never read any of his writings until I became Catholic.


#18

[quote=jebojora]What I read about the different Bibles is that Luther found the Hebrew Canon worked more for backing up his beliefs. I read that both Hebrews and Christians used the same Bible for a long time until the Hebrews found it necessary to take a stand away from Christianity. Then they came up with their official set of books for the Bible. Prior to this there was no reason to make it official because there was no question about the inspired word of God.

So actually, the Hebrews decided that a few books would not be in their version. Then Martin Luther found that the Hebrew version was better suited to his needs.

Also, I read that Martin Luther was under the impression that once he became a priest all desires and temptations would fade. And when he found that he still had sexual desires for women he was appalled. He found that he could not overcome this and therefore he began to question the church. I wonder if it ever occurred to him that he had missed his calling. Perhaps he was called to the vocation of marriage and not the priesthood…

That’s just my take on some of the stuff I’ve read. By the way, I was raised in the Methodist church and converted to Catholicism 7 years ago. In the church I grew up in Martin Luther was a hero, but I never read any of his writings until I became Catholic.
[/quote]

Thank you Jebojora. I believe this is the correct answer for this thread. God bless you.
In Christ,
selvaraj


#19

Luther? Didn’t he trap Superman with krytonite?

Ok, ok stop throwing things at me! Owe!

(Levity, humor, etc.)


#20

[quote=Malachi4U]As I recall Luther didn’t leave the Church, he got booted out. He was excommunicated for heresy?
What did Calvin and Zwingli think of Luther?
How close are Lutheran beliefs today to those of Luther?
[/quote]

This from “Roots of the Reformation” by Karl Adam (can be obtained from The Coming Home Newtwork chnetwork.org/ewtn.htm)). He quotes Karl August Meissinger “If Luther returned today…he would find to his astonishment a Roman Church which he would never have attacked in her present aspect…Above all he would see…that not one of the abuses which were the actual occasion of his break with Rome remains in existence.”(p. 49).

Much has happened to Lutheranism since Luther’s death. I came away from reading this volume with the impression that if Luther returned today he would have more problems with Lutheranism than Catholicism. The book is an interesting read; only 108 pages.


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