Why didn't all of the apostles write scripture and where did the apostles who were future bishops start their respective ministry?


#1

so the 12 apostles all of them didn’t write scripture? why did that happen?

Simon (“who is called Peter”)
Andrew (“his [Peter’s] brother”)
James (“son of Zebedee”)
John (“his [James’s] brother”)
Philip
Bartholomew
Thomas
Matthew (“the tax collector”)
James (“son of Alphaeus”)
Thaddaeus
Simon (“the Cananean”)
Judas Iscariot

Also I have another question just like the chair of peter has its successor, what about the other apostles who are their modern successors and where did they begin their ministry?

Peter - Bishop of Rome
Andrew - Patriach of Constantinople

I only knew the second one because of the recent meeting between Pope Francis and Patriach Bartholomew I

so what about the other apostles and who are their modern day successors and where are they based.


#2

What a great question! I am sure someone around here has the answer; I’m looking forward to it!


#3

Apparently many of the disciples could not read or write.

Also, some did write down-- or recite gospels and scripture for others to write down-- which may have been used as the basis for other groups of early Christianity. But those groups were later considered “heretical” a three or four centuries later and the scriptures were lost. I read about this in a book called* Lost Christianities: The Battles for Scripture and the Faiths We Never Knew *.

We apparently know very little fact on the fate of the apostles. Even their deaths are considered later legendary info, say Christianity scholars.

I’m curious to find out more facts as well, if they exist.

.


#4

Here

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apostolic_see


#5

St Matthew’s successor is the Patriarch of Alexandria

St Thomas’ successor is in India, and claimed by several prelates, including the the two Catholic Major Archbishops there.


#6

Interesting!


#7

I heard one of the apologists (can’t remember who) on Catholic Answers radio say that the apostles expected Jesus to return very soon so they didn’t see the need to write things down, just spread the gospel as quickly and to as many people as possible.


#8

Actually the Patriarch of Alexandria is St Mark the Evangelist’s (Gospel writer, sent to Egypt by Peter) successor.


#9

Note, too, that in the Catholic understanding, God’s word is spread not only through Scripture, but in Apostolic teaching. This ‘Apostolic teaching’ is what the Church means when it talks about “Sacred Tradition”. (Sadly, many non-Catholic Christians hear Catholics talk about ‘tradition’ and think that they mean things that are not what we mean when we use the word ‘tradition’ – things like use of holy water, or lenten fasting. Then, misunderstanding us, they say “hey! you Catholics are just making things up! That’s not what Jesus taught!” :wink: ).

Together, then, in ‘Sacred Scripture’ and ‘Sacred Tradition’, the Church says that we have the Deposit of Faith – that is, the teachings that God intended to give us in order that we might follow Him and make it to heaven. So, all apostles taught what we’d call ‘Sacred Tradition’ – in other words, although they didn’t write Scripture, they certainly taught God’s Word…!


#10

The Apostles, for the most part, participated in missionary work as they had been directed by Jesus at Pentecost:

NABRE Matthew 28:19-20
Go, therefore, and make disciples of all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the holy Spirit, teaching them to observe all that I have commanded you.

Andrew (“his [Peter’s] brother”)
The extent or place of his Andrew’s work is uncertain. Eusebius names Scythia as his mission field. Gregory of Nazianzus mentions Epirus; St. Jerome Achaia; and Theodoret Hellas. Nicephorus states that Andrew preached in Cappadocia, Galatia, and Bithynia, then in the Scythian deserts, afterwards in Byzantium itself, where he appointed St. Stachys as its first bishop, and finally in Thrace, Macedonia, Thessaly, and Achaia. He was crucified bound, not nailed, in order to prolong his sufferings. His martyrdom took place during the reign of Nero, on 30 November, A.D. 60.
newadvent.org/cathen/01471a.htm
See also: newadvent.org/fathers/0819.htm

Bartholomew
No mention of St. Bartholomew occurs before Eusebius. He mentions that Pantaenus was told that the Apostle had preached in Indis before him and had given his converts the Gospel of St. Matthew written in Hebrew. “India” was a name covering a very wide area, including even Arabia Felix. Other traditions represent St. Bartholomew as preaching in Mesopotamia, Persia, Egypt, Armenia, Lycaonia, Phrygia, and on the shores of the Black Sea.
newadvent.org/cathen/02313c.htm

James (“son of Alphaeus”, the “Lesser”)
Christian antiquity holds that James was Bishop of the Church of Jerusalem. James was called the “Just” and was put to death by the Jews.
newadvent.org/cathen/08280a.htm

James (“son of Zebedee”, "the “Greater”)
On Passover in AD 44, Herod Agrippa I killed James, the brother of John, with the sword. According to some dubious traditions James the Greater preached the Gospel in Spain
newadvent.org/cathen/08279b.htm

John (“his [James’s] brother”, the “one Jesus loved”)
John took a prominent part in the founding and guidance of the Church. He had lived for a long time in Asia Minor and was acquainted with the conditions in the Christian communities there, so he became leader of this part of the Church. Eusebius tells us of the Apostle’s banishment to Patmos in the reign of the Emperor Domitian (81-96).
newadvent.org/cathen/08279b.htm

Judas Iscariot
Committed suicide, replaced by Matthias

Matthew (Levi, “the tax collector”)
We have only inaccurate or legendary data about the career of Matthew.kk St. Irenæus tells us that Matthew preached the Gospel among the Hebrews, St. Clement of Alexandria claiming that he did this for fifteen years, and Eusebius maintains that, before going into other countries, he gave them his Gospel in the mother tongue. Almost all ancient writers mention Ethiopia to the south of the Caspian Sea (not Ethiopia in Africa), and some Persia and the kingdom of the Parthians, Macedonia, and Syria.
newadvent.org/cathen/10056b.htm

Matthias
Information concerning the life and death of Matthias is vague and contradictory.
newadvent.org/cathen/10066a.htm

Philip
He belongied to the Apostolic College. The apocryphal “Acts of Philip,” a tissue of fables, reports Philip’s death to Hieropolis.
newadvent.org/cathen/11799a.htm

Simon (“the Cannanite”, “the Zealot”)
The Abyssinians state that he suffered crucifixion as the Bishop of Jerusalem after he had preached the Gospel in Samaria. Where he actually preached the Gospel is uncertain.
newadvent.org/cathen/13796b.htm

Simon (“who is called Peter”, Leader of the Church)
Peter labored in Jerusalem. He also preached in Palestine and in the lands situated farther north. He approved the selection of Matthias to the Apostolic College to replace Judas.
Next, Peter preached in Lydda and Joppe, and He stayed for a time at Antioch. Peter probably preached in Asia Minor. He devoted himself chiefly to the Diaspora. Peter possibly dwelt in Corinth and planted the Church there.
It is an indisputably established historical fact that St. Peter worked and was martyred in Rome.
newadvent.org/cathen/11744a.htm

Thaddaeus (Judas, Son of James, Lebbaeus)
From the Apocryphal book, The Acts of Thaddaeus
Thaddaeus traveled to Edessa and along with Abgarus destroyed idol-temples and built churches; ordained as bishop one of his disciples, and presbyters, and deacons, and gave them the rule of the psalmody and the holy liturgy. Next, he went to the city of Amis. He remained with them for five years, he built a church; and having appointed as bishop one of his disciples, and presbyters, and deacons, and prayed for them, he went away, going round the cities of Syria. He went to Berytus, a city of Phœnicia by the sea; and there he fell died on twenty-first of the month of August.
newadvent.org/fathers/0826.htm

Thomas
Tradition that St. Thomas preached in “India” was widely spread in both East and West and is to be found in such writers as Ephraem Syrus, Ambrose, Paulinus, Jerome, and, later Gregory of Tours and others, still it is difficult to discover any adequate support for the long-accepted belief that St. Thomas pushed his missionary journeys as far south as Mylapore, not far from Madras, and there suffered martyrdom.
newadvent.org/cathen/14658b.htm


#11

Correction…the Alexandria’s lineage is from St. Mark, disciple of Peter.

Antioch lineage is from Peter also.


#12

Well, yes. Jesus told them this. His quote is in the Christian canon.
He was talking about himself and/or “the son of man”:

“Truly I tell you, some who are standing here will not taste death before they see the Son of Man coming in his kingdom.”
(matthew gospel, 16:28)

He is saying that many of them will still be alive when “the son of man” arrives/returns.

.


#13

=namer0331;12034735]so the 12 apostles all of them didn’t write scripture? why did that happen?

Simon (“who is called Peter”)
Andrew (“his [Peter’s] brother”)
James (“son of Zebedee”)
John (“his [James’s] brother”)
Philip
Bartholomew
Thomas
Matthew (“the tax collector”)
James (“son of Alphaeus”)
Thaddaeus
Simon (“the Cananean”)
Judas Iscariot

Also I have another question just like the chair of peter has its successor, what about the other apostles who are their modern successors and where did they begin their ministry?

Peter - Bishop of Rome
Andrew - Patriach of Constantinople

I only knew the second one because of the recent meeting between Pope Francis and Patriach Bartholomew I

so what about the other apostles and who are their modern day successors and where are they based.

Good Question:

All of them had their start in Jerusalem at Pentecost.

Peter was the First among equals = the first Pope even though that name was not yet in existence.

James [the greate/broter of Johnr] was the first Bishop of Jereusalem

Rather give the answer you your question on the starting location of the other apostles; I’d like to address the issue of Succession itself. WAS IT MANDATED by Christ?

In Mt. 10: 1-8 we find Jesus empowering the 12 named apostles to cure desease, evict deamons, and even raise poeple from the dead. BUT ONLY for the Jews, no-one else.

Mt. 10: 5-8 “These twelve Jesus sent: commanding them, saying: Go ye not into the way of the Gentiles, and into the city of the Samaritans enter ye not. But go ye rather to the lost sheep of the house of Israel. And going, preach, saying: The kingdom of heaven is at hand.Heal the sick, raise the dead, cleanse the lepers, cast out devils: freely have you received, freely give”

But then just prior to the Ascendtion of Christ; He changes the mandate: So in a real sense: it is Christ who required and instituted Succession.

Mk.16: 14-15 “At length** he appeared to the eleven **as they were at table: and he upbraided them with their incredulity and hardness of heart, because they did not believe them who had seen him after he was risen again. And he said to them: ****Go ye into the whole world, and preach the gospel to every creature”.

Mt. 28: 16-20 “And the eleven disciples went into Galilee, unto the mountain where Jesus had appointed them… And Jesus coming, spoke to them, saying: All power is given to me in heaven and in earth. Going therefore, teach ye all nations; baptizing them in the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Ghost. Teaching them to observe all things whatsoever I have commanded you: and behold I am with you all days, even to the consummation of the world”.

This, along with severe persecution caused the dispersion of the Apoles AND set the foundation for Succession:thumbsup:

God Bless you,
Patrick


#14

Yes, sorry, that was a typo! Thanks for catching!


#15

Funny you mention that. We just celebrated that event yesterday, in the Ascension – the Son of Man entered into the heavens, having made the heavens and earth His kingdom… :wink:

He is saying that many of them will still be alive when “the son of man” arrives/returns.

And they were. The fact, though, is that some misunderstood him to be talking about the parousia… :wink:


#16

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