Why do people like Wes Anderson and his films?


#1

First of all I don't want to defend any Wes Anderson fans. I appreciate his creativity, but honestly I've watched all his films except Rushmore and Bottle Rocket and to be honest I juts don't get his appeal. The only film I kind of liked was Moonrise Kingdom, but I've watched the Royal Tennanbaums and just couldn't get into it. Same with the Life Aquatic with Steve Zissou. I just couldn't get into it. It seemed boring and pretentious. Also, why do people say they are so funny. I don't see much humor in them. Yes they are odd, and have strange situations, but I don't think I laughed even in moonrise kingdom except at one thing.
So can someone please explain?


#2

[quote="WildCatholic, post:1, topic:326755"]
First of all I don't want to defend any Wes Anderson fans. I appreciate his creativity, but honestly I've watched all his films except Rushmore and Bottle Rocket and to be honest I juts don't get his appeal. The only film I kind of liked was Moonrise Kingdom, but I've watched the Royal Tennanbaums and just couldn't get into it. Same with the Life Aquatic with Steve Zissou. I just couldn't get into it. It seemed boring and pretentious. Also, why do people say they are so funny. I don't see much humor in them. Yes they are odd, and have strange situations, but I don't think I laughed even in moonrise kingdom except at one thing.
So can someone please explain?

[/quote]

The simple answer is "different strokes for different folks." People have different sensibilities. Why does one person like classical music and another country? Why does one love asparagus and another loathe it?

As the old saying goes, "there's no accounting for taste." Peoples emotional reactions to different things are as widely varied as the things themselves.


#3

To answer your question specifically though, as one who was a Wes Anderson fan at one time and who has several friends who still are, I think it's because it resonates with the spirit of the times, namely the postmodern nihilism of the West. People relate to that feeling of emotional torrent amidst an intellectual vacuum of meaning. Anderson's characters are typically a) neurotic b) hopelessly romantic and c) going through some sort of existential crisis. It's very reflective of the experience of our post-Christian secular society, where people are constantly seeking love, connection and meaning in a world that teaches them that these things are illusory, and I think people find some kind of solace in seeing their inner turmoil played out in a narrative where they can safely laugh at their own foibles from a distance via the slightly-more-absurd (but not by much) universe of a Wes Anderson film.


#4

To answer your question, I have no idea. I've seen a couple of his movies and even bought The Royal Tennenbaums because it was on sale really cheap, but I don't remember anything about any of them. I think I fell asleep during Royal Tennenbaums, but that's about all I recall about it. I don't even remember which of the other movies I saw. Possibly Rushmore?


#5

I'm a big fan of many of Wes Anderson's movies so I'll give my perspective. Sperficially, I think they're a marvel to look at. They're very well-crafted and his style is something I like to watch. I find the tone to be a refreshing change-of-pace from standard Hollywood fare. You could almost say some of the characters (and even the humor) are over-the-top while at the same time very low key. I'd get tired of it easily if more movies were like that, but as I noted it makes for a nice change-of-pace when one of his movies comes out every few years. Also more times than not his stories will touch on how fate casts are roles in life, and how sometimes we can fight it and sometimes we can't. Finally, few directors can so excel at populating their films with just the right songs, which is always a treat.


#6

There's that great scene in "The Life Aquatic" where the crew admits to not being specialists in anything despite handling all kinds of expensive equipment and wearing their matching uniforms. One it turns out was a bus driver before signing on board. I thought that was hilarious.

In that movie at least there's a constant level of droll absurdity mixed with genuine pathos that I really appreciated. I think he serves up a similar formula in most of his movies.


#7

I thought his “The Fabulous Mr. Fox” was quite enjoyable.


#8

His films have a unique, quirky appeal to them. He's good with visuals and aesthetic. I loved Royal Tenenbaums, especially Margot's character.


#9

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