Why do we follow the 10 commandments?


#1

I was told growing up that Christians are no longer under the Law of Moses, since we are now under Christ's grace. We no longer follow the laws given to the Israelites in the Old testament. So why do we follow the 10 commandments? Are they not from the Law of the Old Testament, as given to the Israelites?
Just curious. Can someone explain this to me?


#2

The 10 Commandments are based on the morals of Natural Law, which are forever binding. These are laws that are laid on the hearts of all men (some just ignore them). So, the 10 Commandments are just as valid today as they are back then. They are God's laws, instead of Jewish laws. All of the Jewish laws (circumcision, eating kosher, etc.) are no longer binding because Christ fulfilled the Old Law (referring to the Jewish laws).

Also, Jesus reiterates the 10 Commandments in a simpler 2 Commandment form, which boil down to:
1. Love and worship the one true God
2. Love others as yourself

The first few of the 10 Commandments fit within the first, and the rest fit within the second.

Hope that helps.


#3

In my experience, Protestants believe in keeping the Ten Commandments, they just don’t believe it’s necessary for salvation. This ties in with “faith alone” and, for some Protestants, “once saved always saved,” usually with double-predestination. We know from Church teaching, however, that some sins are mortal.


#4

I think it's also worth mentioning, the commandment regarding the sabbath is not based in natural law, so Christians do not follow it. However, Catholics are obliged to attend Mass and rest from servile labor on Sunday, but this is due to current Church Law, not because of that commandment or natural law.


#5

We are not under the Law, but we are still called to fulfill the Law.

Our only commandment is to love, for love fulfills the Law. But since we are poor, imperfect sinners in a world of dark concupiscences, how would we improve if we didn’t know where does God wants us to focus on? Even the Apostles provided lists of aspects that would prevent the baptized from reaching the Kingdom of God (remember St. Paul? “Do not be deceived: neither…” etc.).

If we were under the “Law of Moses”, we would be asked to do much, much more than just keep up with the 10 Commandments! :o


#6

[quote="MattJB, post:1, topic:322367"]
I was told growing up that Christians are no longer under the Law of Moses, since we are now under Christ's grace. We no longer follow the laws given to the Israelites in the Old testament. So why do we follow the 10 commandments? Are they not from the Law of the Old Testament, as given to the Israelites?
Just curious. Can someone explain this to me?

[/quote]

As scripture and the Church teach, the law is holy, spiritual, and good. Man OTOH, is not spiritual; he's in desparate need of the HS, in fact. Once living in the Spirit, under grace, the law is no longer an enemy or an obstacle. We still need to obey it but now we obey out of love rather than fear/pride/selfish interests. St Basil of Casaerea put it this way:

If we turn away from evil out of fear of punishment, we are in the position of slaves. If we pursue the enticement of wages, . . . we resemble mercenaries. Finally if we obey for the sake of the good itself and out of love for him who commands . . . we are in the position of children.

You can read the balanced teachings of the Church regarding the law and grace, the Old Covenant and the New Covenant, the Old Law and the New Law beginning here: scborromeo.org/ccc/p3s1c3a1.htm#1950


#7

So why are Christians against homosexuality? Incest? Those aren’t in the ten. The only sexual sin listed there is adultery. This has always confused me. Christians seem to pick and choose parts of the old testament inconsistently. And if you answer that those are also included in “natural law” (most western liberals would disagree with the first one being against natural law), who decided what is and is not natural law?


#8

[quote="Moses613, post:7, topic:322367"]
So why are Christians against homosexuality? Incest? Those aren't in the ten. The only sexual sin listed there is adultery. This has always confused me. Christians seem to pick and choose parts of the old testament inconsistently. And if you answer that those are also included in "natural law" (most western liberals would disagree with the first one being against natural law), who decided what is and is not natural law?

[/quote]

They are a part of Natural law, whether liberals agree or not. You can see by how incest can cause severe deformities and disease, and homosexuality cannot produce offspring. But remember that the Church does not say that having a same sex attraction is sinful, but it is the homosexual acts that are. But so are heterosexual acts, outside of marriage. The issue of homosexuality and incest is reiterated in the NT, so they are still binding, but also because they are part of natural law.


#9

[quote="Moses613, post:7, topic:322367"]
So why are Christians against homosexuality? Incest? Those aren't in the ten. The only sexual sin listed there is adultery. This has always confused me. Christians seem to pick and choose parts of the old testament inconsistently. And if you answer that those are also included in "natural law" (most western liberals would disagree with the first one being against natural law), who decided what is and is not natural law?

[/quote]

The ten commandments aren't an exhaustive moral code near as I can tell. Anyway, The CC teaches that she's been given the authority to make determinations on matters of faith and morals-that she receives those determinations, actually. Individual Catholics have to decide for themselves how closely they'll hew to those teachings.


#10

I agree, personally & religiously.

You can see by how incest can cause severe deformities and disease, and homosexuality cannot produce offspring. But remember that the Church does not say that having a same sex attraction is sinful, but it is the homosexual acts that are…

Sounds similar to the Jewish approach.

But so are heterosexual acts, outside of marriage…

Again, I agree, but I would have asked the same question about that. In fact, I thought about it, but didn’t want to complicate the question too much.

The issue of homosexuality and incest is reiterated in the NT, so they are still binding, but also because they are part of natural law.

I think this is the real answer I was looking for. I didn’t know that they were reiterated in the NT. Now it makes more sense to me.


#11

Receives in what sense? Prophetically?

Your point is actually quite germane to my question. My question is not as strong on Catholics, who believe that the Church sets doctrine. It was stronger on Protestants, many of whom believe in “only what the Bible says.” Still, that was also answered by the previous respondent, who said that these things are repeated in the NT.


#12

[quote="Moses613, post:11, topic:322367"]
Receives in what sense? Prophetically?

[/quote]

Yes, the Church considers her teachings to be a matter of revelation and her understanding of that revelation to be a gift.


#13

=MattJB;10601514]I was told growing up that Christians are no longer under the Law of Moses, since we are now under Christ's grace. We no longer follow the laws given to the Israelites in the Old testament. So why do we follow the 10 commandments? Are they not from the Law of the Old Testament, as given to the Israelites?
Just curious. Can someone explain this to me?

Hi Matt,

Actually NO:)

There is "THEE LAW" = the ten Commnadments

and then "the laws"; sometimes refurred to as the "laws of Moses" which expanded GOD"S Laws by more than 300 additional demands; many dietary and hygene related, and very prudently grounded for THOSE times.

Later the priest became consumed with legalistic issues and expanded beyond what was reasonable and necessary, simply because they could do so.

God's Laws, like God's Seven Sacraments can never be denied, or altered. Certainly our understanding of them can continue to grow as guided by the Holy Spirit; but just as Yahweh wrote the Commandments on tablets of stone to make us aware that they are Eternal Mandates. So too His Sacraments as a source of necessary grace and forgivieness can never be denined.

Essentially this is because God does NOT change. The God of the OT is the same God of the NT.

What was evil then remains evil today. Judgment then and now must remain Fair and equally Just. Because we are NOW under grace, God has every right to be even more critical of us in present times because of the aids of grace Offered to us.

And as a FYI: the ten Commandments are not the list of the "10 possible sins". They are the ten catagories of sins possible. read maathew chapter five to see what is meant.:thumbsup:


#14

[quote="MattJB, post:1, topic:322367"]
I was told growing up that Christians are no longer under the Law of Moses, since we are now under Christ's grace. We no longer follow the laws given to the Israelites in the Old testament. So why do we follow the 10 commandments? Are they not from the Law of the Old Testament, as given to the Israelites?
Just curious. Can someone explain this to me?

[/quote]

:blush::blush::blush:
hello-

i was talking about this last night at a bible study--

all though saint paul said that the law was a tutor..THE LETTER OF ST. PAUL TO THE GALATIANS
biblescripture.net/Galatians.html

This Epistle of St. Paul to the Galatians presents the theme of justification by faith in ... 9 As we have said before, so I say again now, if any man is preaching to you a .... 24 Therefore the Law has become our tutor to lead us to Christ, so that we ...

so as the law or the Torah-- has not gone away-- only the ceremonial laws, or the animal sacrificial laws for sin or covenant failure.

some groups or domination's say Christ nailed the law to the cross-- and there for we are not under the law..

BUT other Groups say that the "curse of the law" was nailed to the cross,

and we are living out the moral aspects of the law with the help of the Holy Spirit, and with out the necessity of animal sacrifice

and as you know by now the catholic church has over a 1,000 laws that are considered , either mortal or venial, or ordinances that are "required" to be able to go to mass and receive the Eucharist or communion. and to be in good standing..

finally it is said that there were 613 rules in the O.T. that required obedience to follow

so it can be difficult in this "modern age to discover what is "man -made sins or laws "to follow-- because each group add's to the torah of God, seemly to make it better--and then they say-- Christ established this or Christ established that law .

and it is interesting to see all the different "opinions" on this and other forums
:cool::cool:


#15

[quote="MattJB, post:1, topic:322367"]
I was told growing up that Christians are no longer under the Law of Moses, since we are now under Christ's grace. We no longer follow the laws given to the Israelites in the Old testament. So why do we follow the 10 commandments? Are they not from the Law of the Old Testament, as given to the Israelites?
Just curious. Can someone explain this to me?

[/quote]

They are still commandments of God. They are natural law that can't be undone. Jesus taught these commandments as well. He says that we should keep the commandments and love one another. Jesus did not come to abolish the law but to fulfill it. We can't just completely throw out the old law.

Priez pour pape Francois


#16

The Law says a man who steals sheep and slaughters it or sells it must pay restitution to the owner in the amount of 4 sheep. Is this a ceremonial law? (rhetorical question) Is it sacrificial? Does the Catholic Church enforce this law (in the sense of your local clerical authority recommending you do it, since the Church doesn’t have legislative power any more)? How about forgiving all debts every seventh year? Leaving grain that accidentally fell on the ground during harvest for the poor to pick up? Setting up cities of refuge for those who commit manslaughter? I know Christians used to be very concerned about charging each other interest on loans but that seems to have fallen by the wayside. So WADR, it seems to me that Christians believe the entire law of the Torah has “gone away,” except exactly those ones that are in the NT or the Church specifies.


#17

[quote="PJM, post:13, topic:322367"]
Hi Matt,

Actually NO:)

There is "THEE LAW" = the ten Commnadments

and then "the laws"; sometimes refurred to as the "laws of Moses" which expanded GOD"S Laws by more than 300 additional demands; many dietary and hygene related, and very prudently grounded for THOSE times.

Later the priest became consumed with legalistic issues and expanded beyond what was reasonable and necessary, simply because they could do so.

God's Laws, like God's Seven Sacraments can never be denied, or altered.

Certainly our understanding of them can continue to grow as guided by the Holy Spirit; but just as Yahweh wrote the Commandments on tablets of stone to make us aware that they are Eternal Mandates. So too His Sacraments as a source of necessary grace and forgivieness can never be denined.

Essentially this is because God does NOT change. The God of the OT is the same God of the NT.

What was evil then remains evil today. Judgment then and now must remain Fair and equally Just. Because we are NOW under grace, God has every right to be even more critical of us in present times because of the aids of grace Offered to us.

And as a FYI: the ten Commandments are not the list of the "10 possible sins". They are the ten catagories of sins possible. read maathew chapter five to see what is meant.:thumbsup:

[/quote]

*God's Laws, like God's Seven Sacraments can never be denied, or altered. *

the catholic version of a man made law is the extension of the O.T. sacrificial animal system, which was replaced in the N.T. with the Baptism of the Holy Spirit-
BUT the consal of Trent - did codify what is accepted as the current priest hood--

all though this version did not exist in the early 1st 2 centuries of the Jewish massinasic religion, and ceremony

An example of the moral laws contained in the O.T and the N.T, now these are contained in the TORAH,

this is why paul told the corinthans the following info

1 Corinthians 6:10 nor thieves nor the greedy nor drunkards nor ...
bible.cc/1_corinthians/6-10.htm
or are thieves, or greedy people, or drunkards, or are abusive, or cheat ... thieves, greedy people, drunks, slanderers, and robbers will not inherit the kingdom of God. ... the insolent, neither extortioners; these do not inherit The Kingdom of God. ... Acts 20:32 "Now I commit you to God and to the word of his grace, which can ...

REAL SALVATION
www.demonbuster.com/salvation.html
Don't base "Christianity" on the people you know who CALL THEMSELVES ... Among others, I Corinthians 6:9 says "thieves" CANNOT go to Heaven. ... A liar is a liar, and a thief is a thief, whether you call yourself a "Christian" or not. ... "Do you not know that the unrighteous and the wrongdoers WILL NOT inherit or have any ...

True Grace vs False Grace | What Is Grace | Saving Grace
www.evangelicaloutreach.org/true-grace-false-grace.htm
It declares they do NOT go to heaven, but instead to HELL! ... "It is NOT lying, cheating, stealing, RAPING, murdering, or BEING ... "Do you not know that THE WICKED WILL NOT INHERIT THE KINGDOM OF GOD? ... thieves nor the greedy nor drunkards nor slanderers nor swindlers will inherit the kingdom of God" (1 Cor.


#18

[quote="Moses613, post:16, topic:322367"]
The Law says a man who steals sheep and slaughters it or sells it must pay restitution to the owner in the amount of 4 sheep. Is this a ceremonial law? (rhetorical question) Is it sacrificial? Does the Catholic Church enforce this law (in the sense of your local clerical authority recommending you do it, since the Church doesn't have legislative power any more)? How about forgiving all debts every seventh year? Leaving grain that accidentally fell on the ground during harvest for the poor to pick up? Setting up cities of refuge for those who commit manslaughter? I know Christians used to be very concerned about charging each other interest on loans but that seems to have fallen by the wayside.

So WADR, it seems to me that Christians believe the entire law of the Torah has "gone away," except exactly those ones that are in the NT or the Church specifies.

[/quote]

yes you are right-- there are commentaries that say that.. BUT the question is what does the YAWAH say?

have the moral laws gone away? .. as a roman catholic -- i can see all the new instructions that have been added and included in the laws or sins that are to be advised--

just as in the O.T. when a thief was discovered the repayment could be 4 times more-- what commentary would you choose to believe -- what this was the effective form of balance for that sin.

do you think that 4 "hail marry's- and 5 are fathers -- is equivalent?" or how about an act of contrition-- ??

again it depends what commentary you want to embrace.. ?

but now we have the indwelling of the Holy Spirit --

1 John 2:27 (New International Version) - Bible Gateway
www.biblegateway.com/passage/?search=1+John+2%3A27...NIVAs for you, the anointing you received from him remains in you, and you do not need anyone to teach you. But as his anointing teaches you about all.


#19

It is true Christians are not under the Law of Moses. We are under grace. But what does that mean? In a nutshell Christians follow the 10 commandments not because they were given by Moses but because they are consistent with God’s Eternal moral laws that never change. Though shall not kill is a moral law for instance that a good and holy God would consistently require from his people regardless of what covenant they happen to be living under. There is a quote from the catechism to this effect that I can get later. But right now I have to go.


#20

[quote="MattJB, post:1, topic:322367"]
I was told growing up that Christians are no longer under the Law of Moses, since we are now under Christ's grace. We no longer follow the laws given to the Israelites in the Old testament. So why do we follow the 10 commandments? Are they not from the Law of the Old Testament, as given to the Israelites?
Just curious. Can someone explain this to me?

[/quote]

Have you read the Catechism?


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