Why does God hate divorce? (Malachi 2:16)


#1

Marriage covenant is a covenant of love. Since God is love (1 John4:8), it is a covenant of God. No one therefore, can put aside the covenant (Matt 19:6). Divorce therefore, goes directly against God; and those who remarry after divorce commit adultery (Luke 16:18). God is therefore, not pleased with the offering of those who divorce their spouse (Malachi 2: 13-14).

God always stays faithful to His covenant with us. When we were unfaithful to Him, He brought us healing by sacrificing His own life. As believers, we are called to love our spouse just as Christ loves us (Eph 5:25). The Lord told Hosea (Hosea 3:1), “Go, show your love to your wife again, though she is loved by another and is an adulteress. Love her as the Lord loves the Israelites, though they turn to other gods and love the sacred raisin cakes.” We therefore, have to be faithful to our covenant with our spouse, even when there is unfaithfulness and hurt; and bring healing to our spouse by our prayers, sacrifices and support.

Divorce is absolutely prohibited by the Gospels (Mk 10:11-12, Luke 6:18; Matthew 5: 31-32). In Matthew’s gospel the exception is for unlawful marriages.  The exception in the Greek text is porneia (which means incest or fornication), and not moiceia (which means adultery). The exception is for marriages between close relatives, which according to Mosaic Law (Lv 18:6-18) were unlawful, because, they were considered as incest. According to some authors it also refers to Jewish betrothal process, in which, prior to the marriage, if it was discovered that the bride was not a virgin (had committed fornication), the groom could back out. Such was the case when Joseph had planned to back out, when he found out that Mary was pregnant with Jesus.

#2

I am not exactly sure where you are going with this thread.

If the issue has to do with annulments, they are a seaparate issue.


#3

Ummm…You’re preaching to the choir, and to that we say AMEN.


#4

Hmm… I’m all confused now. I’m currently taking a basic catechism class provided by the Diocese of San Diego for credit toward getting a certificate so I can continue teaching.

I held to the belief that marriage as a sacred contract between a man and a woman and that this sacrament was elevated by Jesus. But from what I learn in the Basic Catechism class, it appears that marriage wasn’t a sacrament until the 11th century and up until the 6th century, people can divorce.

The reason given is that marriage is a contract between a man and a woman and that later on, the church requires the priest to be presence to acknowledge the marriage (so that husbands cannot leave their wives and kids and say that the marriage never happened… this is to protect women).

I’m all confused now. Was the sacrament of matrimony instituted by Jesus or was it later declared a sacrament?

Thank you.

Warmest regards,
-Ben


#5

[quote=ble]I’m all confused now. Was the sacrament of matrimony instituted by Jesus or was it later declared a sacrament?
[/quote]

It goes back long before Jesus ministry:

Genesis 2:24
For this reason a man shall leave his father and his mother, and be joined to his wife; and they shall become one flesh.

I believe that makes it the oldest sacrament.


#6

[quote=ble]I’m all confused now. Was the sacrament of matrimony instituted by Jesus or was it later declared a sacrament?
[/quote]

Here’s the deal:

  1. Marriage has existed since mankind began.
    CCC:

1603…The vocation to marriage is written in the very nature of man and woman as they came from the hand of the Creator. …

  1. Marriage was not a “Sacrament” until Christ made it one
    CCC:

1601 “The matrimonial covenant, by which a man and a woman establish between themselves a partnership of the whole of life, is by its nature ordered toward the good of the spouses and the procreation and education of offspring; this covenant between baptized persons has been raised by Christ the Lord to the dignity of a sacrament.”(CIC, can. 1055 § 1; cf. GS 48 § 1.)

  1. Since Christ made it one, there is nothing we can do to “unmake” it a Sacrament.
    CCC:

**1605 **The Lord himself shows that this signifies an unbreakable union of their two lives by recalling what the plan of the Creator had been “in the beginning”: “So they are no longer two, but one flesh.”(Mt 19:6.)

  1. Because it is a Sacrament, the Sacramental Marital relation is a conduit of God’s grace
    CCC:

1661 The sacrament of Matrimony signifies the union of Christ and the Church. It gives spouses the grace to love each other with the love with which Christ has loved his Church; the grace of the sacrament thus perfects the human love of the spouses, strengthens their indissoluble unity, and sanctifies them on the way to eternal life (cf. Council of Trent: DS 1799).

  1. Before Christ made marriage a Sacrament, marriage was good, but it was not Sacramental. That’s the difference.

And no, there was never a time in Church history where marriage was “simply a contract” - that’s not what Christ gave us, and we have no authority to change His gift to us.

Here’s a link to the Catechism section on marriage which has a fuller explanation of everything I’ve said. If you’re confused in the future, I recommend the Catechism be your first stop.

God Bless,
RyanL


#7

[quote=ble]Hmm… I’m all confused now. I’m currently taking a basic catechism class provided by the Diocese of San Diego for credit toward getting a certificate so I can continue teaching.

I held to the belief that marriage as a sacred contract between a man and a woman and that this sacrament was elevated by Jesus. But from what I learn in the Basic Catechism class, it appears that marriage wasn’t a sacrament until the 11th century and up until the 6th century, people can divorce.

The reason given is that marriage is a contract between a man and a woman and that later on, the church requires the priest to be presence to acknowledge the marriage (so that husbands cannot leave their wives and kids and say that the marriage never happened… this is to protect women).

I’m all confused now. Was the sacrament of matrimony instituted by Jesus or was it later declared a sacrament?

Thank you.

Warmest regards,
-Ben
[/quote]

I would not go so far as to say what you read was hogwash, but it isn’t far from that.

One needs to understand that the Sacraments as we have them today and understand them, were not as clearly deliniated in the first few centuries of the Church, but that does not mean that they were “invented” some 6 centuries later. Both the Gospels and the letters of Paul tell us that divorce was limited to very specifi circumstances; and that was in the first century after Christ.

You might want to find something else to read than what you were using. Whoever did the sacramental theology was playing games with history and understanding. All of the sacraments go back to Christ, but the Church reflected on them as well as the teachings of Christ over a long period of time. To say otherwise is to have an interesting agenda, one that you don’t want to follow.

and by the way, marriage is not, and has not been, a contract.

A contract is limited in time and space; it is act specific, and has a termination point. it is best described as a relationship of “I will do this for you if you will (do or refrain from doing) that”.

Marriage is a covenant; if you look at the OT, the covenant between God and Israel was “I will be your God, and you will be my people”, something that goes much deeper than a simple contract. marriage is a reflection of that covenant.


#8

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