Why Evangelicals are returning

to Rome…

Below is an interesting YouTube video (really audio) of an Evangelical Radio show in which two Evangelicals discuss why so many Evangelical Protestants are leaving to join the Catholic Church.

The host and guest are trying to be honest in the show entitled “Why Evangelicals are Returning to Rome.” Although towards the end of the video they are making some statements that are historically inaccurate (about Luther and the Popes); nevertheless, their questioning tries to be honest. It is interesting that they are taking note of a large exodus. I am one of those who Crossed the Tiber to Rome.

Furthermore, this was coming from a Protestant network that is decidedly anti-Catholic. They are willing to discuss openly what has been happening for years now (the exodus of Evangelical ordained ministers to Catholic and Eastern Orthodox Churches). They also mention briefly EWTN, the program Journey Home and the moderator Marcus Grodi, a convert from Evangelical Christianity. It is obvious this is all new to them since they didn’t even know how to pronounce Marcus Grodi’s name.

catholic-convert.com/2011/05/10/evangelicals-becoming-catholic-why/

Sola Scriptura is dead…

Welcome Home Evangelicals…we are not selling Indulgences…that has been reformed…:slight_smile:

Thanks for posting this. I didn’t realize evangelicals were coming in droves.

I met a former choir director on the street recently and he knew that I had converted. And he told me that his grandma was Catholic and as a child she used to bring her grandchildren to mass. He said that he missed the rituals and he is finding church service to be sort of bland.

I’m keeping that one in prayer.

:smiley:

One of these days my parish priest mentioned that the Archdiocese of Miami had 20,000 converts to Catholicism last year, and how the media is silent on that, while the same media is all abuzz with Fr. Alberto Cutie’s new book slamming Catholicism, you know the Catholic priest who converted to Episcopalian after marrying the woman with whom he had an affair and to whom he fathered a child. So, the media is all over Fr. Cutie because he left the Catholic Church and because he is such a vocal critic of the Catholic Church, but they fail to mention that 20,000 people converted to Catholicism in a single archdiocese, last year.

Pipe,

What is amusing is the notion of the need for reform due to sale of indulgences. Absent the sale of indulgences as described what was the reformation/deformation about…it was not about reforming what was but seperating and deforming something seperate…it is good to hear this ignorance as it is stated…ie the need for reform…ok…now that this is reformed why are you there and we are still here…and why are people coming home?

Interesting;)

While I cannot speak for the “Evangelicals”, and speak only for myself as a Lutheran - I am here to explore this very idea. The more we talk, the more we understand each other’s positions - and with the good will I see in this forum, we are discovering that the divergence in our belief and practice is small, and shrinking even as we go forward and begin to speak using words we have jointly defined and understand.

I don’t understand why it was so impossible to see in earlier generations. Surely God was not the one who hid these truths…

My husband and I, along with our daughter, are converts to Catholicism from evangelical Protestantism.

We believe that there are two main reasons that evangelicals are converting:

  1. They read the Bible inside and out, and ask the Holy Spirit to help them understand and apply it. According to Jesus, if human fathers can give good gifts to their children, our Heavenly Father will be even more able to give good gifts to those who ask. The Bible says, “Ask, and it shall be given.” When evangelical Protestants sincerely ask the Holy Spirit to open up the Word of God and help them to understand it, they see that the Bible describes the Catholic Church in every book, and that the Catholic Church IS the Church that Jesus established.

  2. They sincerely love Jesus and want to follow Him and obey Him in all things, even to the point of giving their lives for Him. So when Protestants tell Jesus this and pledge their hearts and very lives to Him, He will, because of His great love for them, lead them to the Catholic Church. Although some evangelical Protestants get scared and shy away from this leading, thinking that they are being deceived, others decide to trust the Lord Jesus and follow Him, even if they are afraid or wary of where He is leading them.

These things have always been true of evangelicals, but the reason why so many are now converting has to do with the ease of acquiring information in this computer age. In the past, it was difficult for evangelicals to explore Catholicism because they were so incredibly busy in their own evangelical Protestant churches with various (and many) ministries. But now through online sites such as CAF and many others, evangelicals can study and learn all about Catholicism, and even see a Mass for themselves, all on their own time. So Praise God for computers!

In fairness, catholic denunciation of the sin of simony long predates the protestant revolt. One may argue that practices haven’t always conformed with theology and that’s true (as recent scandals well illustrate). But let’s not imply that catholicism once formally endorsed the purchase of indulgences as a financial transaction. It may have seemed that way to some, but there is a real and substantial difference between recognizing the merit in a sacrificial contribution that comes from the heart and enabling a cynical attempt to use money to avoid the consequences of sin.

Man,

I am with you however as you listen to the podcast you hear that the Church needed reforrm based on “sale of indulgences”…so if that was rectified why the need to depart and form or deform?

Hillaire Belloc wrote a rather interesting book on the subject called “How the Reformation Happened.” He makes a pretty compelling argument that the theological principles of the ‘reformation’ were trumped up rationalizations for the REAL motivations that created and sustained the revolt: greed and lust for the lands owned by the Church and religious orders. You have to read the book, because my nutshell doesn’t remotely do it justice.

I am sure Belloc was completely unbiased :slight_smile:

Aren’t we all? :stuck_out_tongue:

Since the Council, the Catholic Church has softened its language and policy on the re-emancipation of separated protestant brethren. This change alone has paid huge dividends in terms of conversion numbers as well as the overall look and feel of Catholic parishes in North America and abroad. Moreover, these big numbers have ushered in changes in architecture, music, liturgy, catechesis, the sacraments, parish and diocesan leadership - essentially the whole culture of Catholicism.

The host of the podcast also reported that a large number of former evangelicals have converted to Orthodoxy in recent decades. It’s worth noting that the road from protestant evangelicalism to Orthodox Christianity is longer and requires much more effort and humility than the road back to Roman Catholicism. No one is allowed to waltz into Orthodoxy with a sense of entitlement. Prospective converts submit themselves to a year of attending liturgical services and classroom studies. Heresies of their former confessions are given no quarter. They are immediately exposed to the light of day and thoroughly debunked by the teachings of the Apostles and Church fathers. Serious business indeed. And so much more newsworthy.

I believe the same is for the Catholic case.

Mark,

The light of day is needed to see as you recall that for Paul it was shells that fell from the eyes once blinded on straight street…gotta set em straight…:slight_smile:

With all due respect, Mark, I disagree with you.

From what I’ve seen, the Evangelicals that are converting to Catholicism are yearning for traditionalist Catholicism, as in old-style,* missa cantata* Catholicism of our fathers. I think the majority of Evangelicals that are looking for Catholicism are looking for it for the same reason they seek the beauty of Orthodoxy.

I know this is a no-no to say on this forum but the reason I’ve been interested in Catholicism is for that old Church. The modernist Church with the empty, lifeless unsung Mass and the ugly new age architecture does it no justice and does not impress me.

OK, let the massacre begin.

I disagree with this.

Were you ever an evangelical Protestant? My husband and I were, and we still have many family members and acquaintances who are strong evangelical Protestants. (We don’t have too many evangelical friends anymore–most of them ditched us after we became Catholic.)

Yes, there are certainly all kinds of evangelicals, and I’m sure that many of them are looking for tradition and ancient practices.

But the evangelicals that we know definitely prefer a more modern style of Catholicism, and find the ancient Catholic practices, especially use of Latin throughout the Mass, a definite “stumbling block.”

It would be useful for you to understand that above all, most evangelical Protestants seek a relationship with Jesus Christ, and this means understanding Him and learning more about Him and of Him. They want good solid theological teaching through the preaching of the sermon and the singing of the music. What this means for most evangelicals is Mass in their own language. And of course, that means the OF Mass, not the EF.

I recognize and respect that you know evangelicals who are seeking “traditional Catholicism.” I hope you will recognize and respect that I know evangelicals who want “modern Catholicism,” not the “liberal” Catholicism, but rather, “vernacular Catholicism.”

I was once a Presbyterian before reverting to the Catholic church around 1978. I have visited other churches. My wife is Lutheran. IHer son was a long time member of Willowcreek and now belongs to another.

I see churches doing a lot of good. People do turn their lives to Christ and change their ways.My wife’s church donates to the food pantry at my church. The Methodist church next door hosts PADS. The Northern Illinois Food Bank has volunteers from many churches.

But sometimes it gets confusing and distracting. Different interpretations on major issues (like Baptism and salvation). With all the divorces and remarriages what is God’s will? What is communion? Theater seating? Coffee table worship? Some churches have ministers in casual dress and there are no crosses. I do accept them as Christian but is this what Christ wants?

In the end I returned to the church because I read the bible and read verses that others seemed to skip over. And it seemed where there was division my interpretation of scripture was always Catholic. And the biggest issue for me was abortion. Could a church be really of the Lord if not anti-abortion. Some conservative tv evangelists gave life lip service but it was the Catholic church which really opposed.

I was born an Evangelical ‘Protestant’ (Evangelicals find the term doesn’t relate to us), in the Assemblies of God, with a pastor father.

Yes, there are certainly all kinds of evangelicals, and I’m sure that many of them are looking for tradition and ancient practices.

But the evangelicals that we know definitely prefer a more modern style of Catholicism, and find the ancient Catholic practices, especially use of Latin throughout the Mass, a definite “stumbling block.”

It probably depends. However I tend to think that the Evangelicals that are looking to Rome aren’t doing so because of how ‘modern’ the Catholic Church looks. It’s because they have studied the Church’s doctrine and history and have discovered something that they feel is missing. The average Evangelical, full in his faith, is not impressed by the Eucharist.

It would be useful for you to understand that above all, most evangelical Protestants seek a relationship with Jesus Christ, and this means understanding Him and learning more about Him and of Him. They want good solid theological teaching through the preaching of the sermon and the singing of the music. What this means for most evangelicals is Mass in their own language. And of course, that means the OF Mass, not the EF.

I’m not so convinced this is true.
Yes Evangelicals above all search for a deeper relationship with Jesus. But when they begin looking toward a more ancient variation of Christianity - whether Catholicism, or Orthodoxy, or Lutheranism - they do it because they are searching for something that they feel their standard, emotional Evangelical service is lacking. And this is why I believe they tend closer to the more traditionalist form of Catholicism, rather than the more modern.

It is also a big reason why many are streaming toward Orthodoxy - they like the ancient practices and tradition.

I was raised as an Evangelical and attended those type of churches up until 6 years ago when I started attending a more liberal church.

God knows my heart and what would get my attention.

I thank God I found the Latin mass first. It made an impression on me, that the OF would not have. But that is me.

I am curious as to the percentage of Evangelicals that attend OF’s versus EF’s.

And of those who attend the EF, how many of them if given the choice of their first mass would have chosen the EF versus the OF.

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