Why is fish not considered a meat?


#21

[quote=Bobby Jim]I’ve heard the term “veg-aquarian” to describe this :slight_smile:
[/quote]

ha ha :smiley:


#22

[quote=Steph700]I think the technical term for someone like myself who doesn’t eat beef, poultry, etc, but will eat fish is a pescatarian. But who wants to explain that at a dinner party?? :wink:
[/quote]

Expecially after a few glasses of alcahol :dancing:

[quote=Scott_Lafrance]I think you are referring to Vegans
[/quote]

No, Vegans do not eat anything that originated in the animal kingdom i.e dairy, eggs, meat (including fish :wink: ), honey, and will not wear any animal byproducts such as leather or suede or even silk etc.

Vegetarians are the same although will eat dairy and some eat eggs and will also eat honey.

From the Vegetarian Society web site vegsoc.org/info/definitions.html

Definitions

A vegetarian is someone living on a diet of grains, pulses, nuts, seeds, vegetables and fruits with or without the use of dairy products and eggs (preferably free-range).

A vegetarian does not eat any meat, poultry, game, fish, shellfish or crustacea, or slaughter by-products such as gelatine or animal fats.

Types of Vegetarian
Lacto-ovo-vegetarian. Eats both dairy products and eggs. This is the most common type of vegetarian diet.

Lacto-vegetarian. Eats dairy products but not eggs.
Vegan. Does not eat dairy products, eggs, or any other animal product.

Fruitarian. A type of vegan diet where very few processed or cooked foods are eaten. Consists mainly of raw fruit, grains and nuts. Fruitarians believe only plant foods that can be harvested without killing the plant should be eaten.

Macrobiotic. A diet followed for spiritual and philosophical reasons. Aims to maintain a balance between foods seen as ying (positive) or yang (negative). The diet progresses through ten levels, becoming increasingly restrictive. Not all levels are vegetarian, though each level gradually eliminates animal products. The highest levels eliminate fruit and vegetables, eventually reaching the level of a brown rice diet.

Other terms can be used in describing various vegetarian diets, though their exact meaning can differ. The term strict vegetarian may refer to a vegan diet, though in other cases it may simply mean a lacto-ovo-vegetarian diet. The terms common or broad vegetarian may be used to refer to lacto-ovo-vegetarians. Demi-vegetarian is a term sometimes used to describe persons who eat no or little meat but may eat fish. Persons consuming fish but no meat are sometimes called pescetarians.

[quote=Timidity]What about potatoes? They have eyes, after all.

And lettuce has a head…

:rotfl: Sorry, just having some pun!
[/quote]

No, you are just disturbed :smiley:

Yours in the Spirit

Pious


#23

[quote=Scott_Lafrance]I think you are referring to Vegans, a group that I oppose vehemently. Some have even gone as far as calling me a Vegaphobe.
[/quote]

Why would you oppose them? Or do you oppose every group that has more compassion towards a certain group than you do? I was vegan for over 5 years, and everyday offered my sacrifice up to God for the conversion of sinners to the Catholic faith. Why would you oppose a group that wants to end suffering/exploitation for a group of God’s creatures?

and remember, adam and eve were vegan…well until they sinned…and remember when the good ol’ days come, even wolf will lie with lamb…wow…vegan wolfs…sweet.


#24

[quote=Seven Sorrows]Why would you oppose them? Or do you oppose every group that has more compassion towards a certain group than you do? I was vegan for over 5 years, and everyday offered my sacrifice up to God for the conversion of sinners to the Catholic faith. Why would you oppose a group that wants to end suffering/exploitation for a group of God’s creatures?

and remember, adam and eve were vegan…well until they sinned…and remember when the good ol’ days come, even wolf will lie with lamb…wow…vegan wolfs…sweet.
[/quote]

Because I oppose any group that elevates animals to the same level as humans. They aren’t. If you were a vegan for spiritual reasons as a matter of personal sacrifice, wonderful. However, you have to admit that most secular, and even many religious vegans have an agenda. Humans are placed in a higher level of importance within God’s creation.


#25

[quote=Seven Sorrows]Why would you oppose them? Or do you oppose every group that has more compassion towards a certain group than you do?
[/quote]

Don’t you think the statement “Or do you oppose every group that has more compassion towards a certain group than you do?” is unfair. It would be so bad if it was funny, but it isn’t.


#26

Maybe the lesson is that we DO know a lot about Jesus if we read the scriptures.

or… maybe the lesson is that it’s dangerous to derive lessons from the silence of scripture. :stuck_out_tongue:


#27

[quote=jeffreedy789]or… maybe the lesson is that it’s dangerous to derive lessons from the silence of scripture. :stuck_out_tongue:
[/quote]

In other words, “The absence of evidence is not evidence of absence.”

(Don’t know who originated that line, but I’m not ready yet to attribute it to Rummy.)

DaveBj


#28

[quote=Blanka]I’d say we can safely exclude driving a car …
[/quote]

Oh I dunno…

WARNING IRREVERANT BUT HUMOROUS

What would Jesus Drive


#29

There is an interesting typological consistency in not eating meat on the “mini-Good-Fridays” during Lent – when we don’t eat meat, we acknowledge that the “sacrificed meat,” Christ, has died for us and is buried; it is temporarily gone.


#30

they’ll be in my prayers tomorrow at the Easter Vigil.

Soooo many people fall away then come back with a greater faith then ever before Loboto :wink:


#31

While I don’t know that it has anything to do with it, I sometimes meditate on the observation:

During the 40 days and 40 nights of the great flood the only animal available to be used for food would have been fish.

tee
(Um, excepting of course, the unfortunate “unicorn steak night” incident :rotfl: )


#32

[quote=tee_eff_em]During the 40 days and 40 nights of the great flood the only animal available to be used for food would have been fish.
[/quote]

Umm… wrong? Noah had a boatload of “clean” animals and birds to eat.


#33

[quote=tee_eff_em]During the 40 days and 40 nights of the great flood the only animal available to be used for food would have been fish.
[/quote]

Unless, of course, you don’t have a fishing pole. DOH! Also, what would you use for bait?


#34

[quote=Pious]Remember vegetarians do not eat anything with a face (and that includes worms) :yup:
[/quote]

The first thing they do when they prepare a chicken is chop off the head… solves THAT problem! :smiley:

Side note: “veganism” has got to be on my top 10 of most annoying things ever. There’s no legitimate reason for what they do, and yet they’re so hung up on their lifestyle most of them treat it like a religion. One girl I know spoke of her future husband first having to “convert” to being a vegan before she married him!


#35

[quote=BibleReader]There is an interesting typological consistency in not eating meat on the “mini-Good-Fridays” during Lent – when we don’t eat meat, we acknowledge that the “sacrificed meat,” Christ, has died for us and is buried; it is temporarily gone.
[/quote]

Yeah, and in another thread, didn’t you tell me that the fish actually represented Christ in a way or something like that? Regarding the multiplying loaves story, specifically… the 2 (church serving the) fish (flesh of Christ)?


#36

[quote=jeffreedy789]great scott, you’re right!

and you know, now that i think about it, it doesn’t record Him brushing His teeth, exercising, doing homework, driving a car, playing any sort of game, smiling, laughing, combing His hair, taking a shower, using the restroom, or putting His hands in His pockets, either.

i think there’s DEFINITELY a lesson to be learned here…
[/quote]

This is so funny, I LOVE this, he he he. You are right.


#37

[quote=exoflare]Yeah, and in another thread, didn’t you tell me that the fish actually represented Christ in a way or something like that? Regarding the multiplying loaves story, specifically… the 2 (church serving the) fish (flesh of Christ)?
[/quote]

Remember that the requirement is not affirmative: We are not affirmatively instructed to eat fish. The preference for fish is unrelated to the meat prohibition.


#38

I don’t know if it is true but I read somewhere that at one time Penguins, soon after they were firsh encountered by Europeans, were classified as “fish” for purposes of “what’s for dinner on Friday”

anybody else know anything about that?


#39

[quote=BibleReader]Remember that the requirement is not affirmative: We are not affirmatively instructed to eat fish. The preference for fish is unrelated to the meat prohibition.
[/quote]

I know, but I thought it was kind of a neat coincidence.


#40

[quote=Steve Andersen]I don’t know if it is true but I read somewhere that at one time Penguins, soon after they were firsh encountered by Europeans, were classified as “fish” for purposes of “what’s for dinner on Friday”
[/quote]

All I could find was from Melville’s The Encantadas, where he says

And truly neither fish, flesh, nor fowl is the penguin; as an edible, pertaining neither to Carnival nor Lent; without exception the most ambiguous and least lovely creature yet discovered by man.

If true, however, it would be similar to the capybara, the world’s largest rodent. I’ve heard various stories about this, so I wouldn’t put too much faith in the exact details repeated here, but here’s what Wikipedia says about it:

When European missionaries first met capybaras in South America during the 16th century, they wrote to Rome for guidance, saying “there is an animal here that is scaly but also hairy, and spends time in the water but occasionally comes on land; can we classify it as a fish?” The question was significant, as the Catholic faith then forbade eating meat (other than fish) during Lent, the period of abstinence lasting 40 days before Easter. Having a second-hand description of the animal, and not wanting the petitioners to turn away from Catholicism, the Church agreed and declared the capybara a fish — a decision that was never reversed.

The capybara now has become a seasonal dish, like turkeys for Thanksgiving in the US.

Picture of capybaras, way too large for nearby croc:

http://www.ferrarofilms.net/WEB%20FOTOS%20NUEVAS%202003/CAPYBARA-ICONO.jpg

BTW, is reptile meat considered “carnis”? I suspect officially it is not, maybe because it is cold-blooded, although it tastes just like steak to me. Personally, I am going the extra mile and refraining from reptiles during Lent.:wink:


DISCLAIMER: The views and opinions expressed in these forums do not necessarily reflect those of Catholic Answers. For official apologetics resources please visit www.catholic.com.