Why is Islamophobia worse now than just after 9/11? A researcher explains


#1

*LN: In some ways it feels like we’ve gone backward since 9/11, when we had President Bush going to mosques and saying that Islam was not the enemy. What’s driving this recent shift in public sentiment?

JB: There are activists and media commentators pushing a particular anti-Muslim line and fearmongering about Islam and Muslims. Take for example the poll that Donald Trump referenced in his press release and his press conference last night [which said that 25 percent of American Muslims agree that violence against other Americans is justified]. It was from the Center for Security Policy. We and many other organizations have written about its long history of spreading misinformation about Islam and Muslims, not just on the fringe but really in the mainstream. We’ve seen a number of presidential candidates in the GOP who have gone to events hosted by this organization or who have cited this organization as their source on a lot of things.*

vox.com/2015/12/9/9880512/islamophobia-worse-now

What boggles my mind is how did all of a suddem terms like Islamist, Jihadist, and Radical Islamic terror become mainstream. The fact of the matter is that one simply can not find any influential leaders of the 8th-18th century using terms like Islamist, Jihadist, and Radical Islamic terror. IMO President GWB showcased excellent leadership skills in the aftermath of 9/11 by visiting a D.C Mosque and telling the world “Islam is peace”. In fact just last week one of my Muslim friends told me that he supported GWB in 2000 and 2004.

Its unfair for Muslims to have to hear terms like Jihadist being applied to ISIL members by the media as opposed to the media applying the term Jihad to the many peaceful Muslims of the world who work against ISIL. Truthfully I work with Muslims everyday and when I hear that Muslim kids are afraid to go out in public due to Islamophobia from some GOP candidates(mainly Trump), it makes me wonder when and why did all of a sudden these GOP folks start criticizing Islam?

I think every member of this forum can agree that ISIL is bad. So knowing that, why would anyone who knows even slightly of Islam suggest that ISIL is a group of Jihadists? And if you do think its ok to label ISIL as Jihadists, please I ask kindly would you label a Christian who claims the Bible approves of attacking black Christians as a Radical Christian?

I mean to think that Donald Trump becomes the GOP nominiee is stunning, stunning considering how GOP Presidents of the past have never used the type of language toward Muslims that we see GOP canadates of today using toward Muslims. And boy, the USA was a power house of a country during the 20th century. After WW2 we went from the 17th strongest armed forces in the world to having the most powerful armed forces in the world. Btw Muslims served proudly in the US military during WW2. We are still a powerhouse today but I think an argument can be made that we are not as strong as we were during the 1990s to mid 2000s compared to 2010-present.

I will never forget this Muslim man who told me why he supported GWB. It was not only due to GWBs foreign and domestic policies, but also due to the fact that Bush has tolerate views toward non Christian religions.


#2

Current fears or concerns about Islam in this country are not because of Trump, activists, or media pundits. It’s because 14 innocent people were slaughtered in San Bernardino by two people (and perhaps others) who obviously planned to bomb more people, all in the name of a religion which, depending on one’s view of it, sanctions it.

Sometimes peoples’ fears are justified by the facts, regardless of what anyone says about them.

And if ISIS or AQ or any number of organizations who believe in this kind of thing call themselves “jihadis”, is there some reason why we should try to persuade ourselves that they aren’t?


#3

If there’s Islamaphobia-- I’m not seeing much if any at all.

I do see a valid concern with actually enforcing our immigration laws. Even Trump indicated that was temporary-- until we could sort out how we sort the jihadis Islamists from the peaceful Muslims. (may not be entirely accurate- but I think of Islam as a political theocratic system as opposed to Muslim as a religion).

Interesting in that no one seems to be worried about all the pro-Palestinian anti Israel rhetoric might foster ‘Jewaphobia’. (Yea, I know the right word is anti-Semitism), yet according to the FBI there are significantly more hate crimes against Jews than any other religion.


#4

Well said. :thumbsup:


#5

That “view” that you speak of is exactly what is being shaped by Trump et. al. The fact is mainstream Muslim leaders in the US do not sanction the actions of the San Bernadino shooters any more than the USCCB sanctions the shootings at Planned Parenthood. In this case perception is everything.


#6

Well, in my part of the states several Imams indicated they wouldn’t identify any radical Islamists in their congregations. Were evasive when asked about their support or disagreement with ISIS interpretation and application of the principles of Islam. CAIRs response is routinely to obfuscate and cast blame on some of the victims, and focus on avoiding a backlash vice disavowal of the actions of the shooters. They are however, aiding the shooters families- which would be far more tolerable if they were vociferous in denouncing the shooters actions.

There was one Imam in Texas that did come out and denounce ISIS in extremely harsh terms with no equivocating whatsoever. Hopefully he’s carrying as I think he’s as liable to be a victim of radical jihadists, and maybe moreso, than the average American.


#7

I would like to see their exact words and context before I buy into your characterization of what they said.

Were evasive when asked about their support or disagreement with ISIS interpretation and application of the principles of Islam.

…ditto…

CAIRs response is routinely to obfuscate and cast blame on some of the victims, and focus on avoiding a backlash vice disavowal of the actions of the shooters.

Isn’t disavowing the actions of the shooters exactly what you and others are requiring that they do? What is wrong with that? As for casting blame on the victims,* show me the quote*!

They are however, aiding the shooters families- which would be far more tolerable if they were vociferous in denouncing the shooters actions.

You set the bar so high on “required denouncing” that I doubt if they could ever pass. And the shooter’s families, by all accounts, were innocent regarding the plans these two had. They are in grief now, and human decency would call for supporting them in their grief.


#8

I agree-- human decency calls for being charitable towards them, assume they are telling the truth about what they knew until proven otherwise.

Unfortunately, it was a radio interview and I don’t have a transcript.

I mentioned the Texas Imam because I think one of the things that’s being overlooked is the division within Muslims themselves. There is as much antipathy between Islamist factions and other Muslims as towards non-Muslims, the strict interpretation by ISIS calls for killing other Muslims who they view as apostates. I would suspect that we will see that here as well, targeting of Muslims by Muslims. Which shouldn’t be a reason for blocking Muslim immigration, but an argument for doing what we can in vetting the immigrants.


#9

Personally, I think that as more Americans figure out what Sharia law is, and discover how many Muslims support it (whether they’ll say so or not), Islamophobia will continue to rise. I can’t imagine it going down.


#10

You know I have this crazy idea it might be because people who are Muslims have killed a lot of people. Is that mad or “wascist” or “ismyllamaaphobic”?

I always ask the question with the true statement that not ALL Muslims are suicide bombers but tell me if there are ANY suicide bombers who aren’t Muslims?


#11

I think it depends on where you live. In many of the Northeastern cities and other large US cities in the northern and western states, there is a noticeable growth in the number of traditionalist Muslims. Meaning, that we see more women covering their faces, not just their hair.

Of course, people are judging a book by it’s cover, but I think this is the real reason for “islamophobia.” Many Americans (if not all) view the covering of the face by women to be an extreme form of Islam, so when people see women covering their whole bodies, except their eyes, it makes them fearful.

God Bless


#12

I disagree. The racism against Muslims was already there long before the San Bernardino incident and others of a similar nature. Like other kinds of racism, it is based on fear of the stranger and his culture and fear of the unknown, and it lies in wait of an event and a leader to which it can attach and justify itself.


#13

Jews are pretty well established here in North America, including a large presence in the entertainment culture. They certainly aren’t strangers or unknown. Yet they bear the brunt of hate crimes.


#14

See this link, starting with “History, pre-1980”. You will see references to Indians, Dutch, Russians, Chinese, Japanese, Germans, and Koreans, although the news since 1980 has been dominated primarily by Muslim suicide bombers. But remember, there are 1.6 billion Muslims. As a percentage, how many of them are suicide bombers?


#15

Utter nonsense. Until people started getting killed (9/11, Bali, London, Madrid, etc etc etc etc) most Muslims were viewed like everyone else.

It’s not “racism”. Islam is a religion!!! I hate having to point this out. “Sectarian” - fine but lets not pander to the UN who have Saudi Arabia as part of the “Human Rights” panel.


#16

My statement confirms this. “Not ALL”

Ok,
Inside the last 15 years how many suicide bombers haven’t been Muslim?


#17

why would anyone who knows even slightly of Islam suggest that ISIL is a group of Jihadists?

Because ISIL’s ancestor organizations have used the terms jihad and jihadi to describe their actions. In the late 1900s, when Islam-associated terror began, there was even an entity calling itself Islamic Jihad.

So in the west , that was the association that got remembered.

And if you do think its ok to label ISIL as Jihadists, please I ask kindly would you label a Christian who claims the Bible approves of attacking black Christians as a Radical Christian?

No, because there is no historic connection between that kind of behavior and “Radical Christianity.” In fact there is no Radical Christianity as such.

ICXC NIKA


#18

The term “Islamophobia” is a fraud. There are few Americans who are opposed to Muslims living in this country. That’s not what concerns Americans. What concerns many Americans are the Islamic radicals who have vowed terror in our country, and have acted on that vow already, and their stated intention to infiltrate using the current refugee crisis.
I am really quite tired of the progressive movement using this false narrative , that anyone who opposes the president is a racist, homophobe, Islamaphobe, etc. If we want to measure the history of hatred in the country, it is the Democratic Party and progressives who come up short - from bigots such as Woodrow Wilson and FDR, to tyrants such as Andrew Jackson, and the slavery and segregation south, up to today’s anti-Christian policies of President Obama.

Islamophobia is not worse than it was after 911. The fact is the GWB, for all his faults, was a far, far better leader in crisis than Obama could ever dream of being, and the American people sense the failings of this president to lead.

Jon


#19

:thumbsup: although Dubya was marginally better. He created a mess in the ME but not deliberately


#20

Amen Jon its a false construct of the left playing the perennial victimhood card which is basically radical propaganda.

pho·bi·a
ˈfōbēə/Submit
noun
an extreme or irrational fear of or aversion to something.
“he had a phobia about being under water”
synonyms: fear, irrational fear, obsessive fear,

There’s a legitimate national security concern and by large directly a result of the current administration. People have every right to speak up just as the radical left does whenever their groundless emotions flair up.


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