Why is it called the host if it BECOMES the body


#1

Just a question that occurred to me a few days ago.

Why do we call the bread a "host"?

I think of the term "host" as something that might "contain" rather than "become"....
For instance, if I welcome someone into my home I and my home "host" that person - but we do not "become" that person.
Another (kind of yucky) use of the term "host" would where a parasite (told you it was yucky) exists inside a "host" body....

So I guess I'm just wondering how we came to call the bread the "host" since it does not "contain" but rather "becomes" the body of Christ.

Thoughts??

Peace
James


#2

newadvent.org/cathen/07489d.htm


#3

Host is from the Latin hostia, meaning victim. Although before the consecration it is not yet the Divine Victim of the Holy Sacrifice, it is still customary to call the communion bread a host, by association with that Sacrifice. It is even referred to as a victim (hostia) in the Latin text of the Mass before the consecration.


#4

:thumbsup:


#5

lmgtfy.com/?q=why+is+the+eucharist+called+a+host


#6

[quote="Ad_Orientem, post:3, topic:320607"]
Host is from the Latin hostia, meaning victim. Although before the consecration it is not yet the Divine Victim of the Holy Sacrifice, it is still customary to call the communion bread a host, by association with that Sacrifice. It is even referred to as a victim (hostia) in the Latin text of the Mass before the consecration.

[/quote]

Awesome. Learn something new every day.


#7

[quote="Ad_Orientem, post:3, topic:320607"]
Host is from the Latin hostia, meaning victim. Although before the consecration it is not yet the Divine Victim of the Holy Sacrifice, it is still customary to call the communion bread a host, by association with that Sacrifice. It is even referred to as a victim (hostia) in the Latin text of the Mass before the consecration.

[/quote]

Ahah! That's cool. Thanks.


#8

This is what happens when you take Latin out of the parishes. Come on, people, have none of you ever participated in Benediction before? "O salutaris Hostia...."


#9

[quote="aemcpa, post:8, topic:320607"]
This is what happens when you take Latin out of the parishes. Come on, people, have none of you ever participated in Benediction before? "O salutaris Hostia...."

[/quote]

To be fair, people use two variations in English: host and victim. One is very clearly understood, the other not so much.


#10

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