Why is Jesus called Everlasting Father in Isaiah 9:6 if God the Father is distinct from God the Son?

In Trinitarian theology God is 3 distinct person but one in being(Essence). Yet Isaiah prophetises that one of Jesus titles is “Everlasting Father” among other titles like Prince of Peace and Wonderful counselor. What does this really mean ?

‘To see me is to see the Father’, ‘But the Counselor, the Holy Spirit…’ ‘The Word was with God and the Word was God’

Ultimately it’s a great mystery. There is one God.

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OP, given that you have only been registered on the forum for a few hours and have already started one thread questioning Mary as Mother of God that you then never responded to, it’s beginning to appear that you are not posting here in good faith.

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Personally I read that title of Jesus in light of him being our ‘high priest’ (since we call all our priests ‘father’, and insofar as Jesus is the high priest above all priests, he certainly deserves that title too).

The relationship Jesus has with humans can also be considered ‘fatherly’ in another sense: that is, insofar as he is the new Adam (like Mary is the new Eve), and they (in a sense) ‘parent’ all Christians. While at the same time Jesus is also the Son and relates to us (the Church) from the position of spouse.

God is God, and when we humans try to understand our relationship with God (including with each person of the Trinity), lots of different images work (and no single image is necessarily ‘sufficient’). Insofar as Jesus is our high priest and all Christians are ‘fruit’ that he bears, he is like a father to us. Insofar as Jesus invites us to Communion with himself who is the bridegroom, he is like a husband to us. In other ways he is our brother.

None of these elements of the relationship between God and man take away from the fact that, in Himself (in the Trinity itself which precedes creation entirely), God is one God in three persons and their identity can be known as Father, Son, and Holy Spirit. Though Jesus (the Son) might in some ways aptly be called a father by us (because he is our high priest, though really we use other language at a much higher ratio than that), we usually keep terms distinct by saying ‘Father’ mostly when we mean God the Father. Not Christ as regards him technically being considerable as our ‘father’ in the sense of high priest obedient to the Father, or ‘father’ in the sense of the one who bears the fruit of Christians (since bearing fruit is a thing that fathers and mothers do). It’s much more typical (at least in my region) to simplify terms by referring to Christ as the high priest but not explicitly saying ‘father’ (so as to not be confusing), and mostly referring to Christ in his aspect of the bridegroom. But yeah it’s still fair for us to refer to Jesus as a ‘father’ in some senses (for the reasons given above; and maybe more that I’m unaware of), it’s just not that common.

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Why not tell us what you think instead of trolling the forums?

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He is saying that the Messiah will be the Father of the Church that He will create.

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So i came here to find out what Catholics think on certain things and you say that im trolling? You are the Catholics here so you answer.

Literally, it’s describing him as the founder of a nation that will exist forever. For Christians, that is the Kingdom of God, and the Church, which unites all of humanity in the realm of grace. The exalted language is an indication of his divinity (“I and my Father are one” John 10:30). He is also the High Priest (Hebrews 7:26). The Son and the Father are distinct persons; the Son is the perfect image of the Father.

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Neithan i like your avatar. Iv seen it before but this time i looked more closely and noticed the Cross is not setting on any one space as a chess piece should be. :face_with_monocle: :+1:t3:

Peace!!!

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We expect people who ask questions to participate in the discussion. Most posters who have a genuine question about Catholic belief do this. They don’t just post a question and then ignore all the responses and go start a new thread questioning something else about Catholicism.

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If you want others to answer your questions, you’ll have to start answering our questions too. I’m still waiting for your answer to the question I addressed to you by name on your other thread, yesterday:

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You have reminded me of something. On another thread a few years ago there was a guy who posted “How can we explain Trinity in rational way? I cannot do it.” He made a few other posts of which the common thread was an attack on Jesus’ divinity. He always pretended to be “one of us” but was in fact obviously a Moslem trolling.

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Each person of the Blessed Trinity is God, whole and entire.

To have seen Jesus is to have seen the Father, as Jesus said to Philip at the Last Supper.

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Well hopefully he learned something. Or someone else reading the replies did.

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