Why is the Catholic Church so concerned about the awful plight of immigrants, but mum on the extreme plight of the starvation of children?

3.5 million innocent children dying of starvation (in agony) yearly is a crime against humanity!

“Whoever shuts their ears to the cry of the poor will also cry out and not be answered.”
~ Proverbs 21:13

I can’t imagine how you arrived at this conclusion. The Church is and has been well invested in poverty and hunger, Catholic Relief Services come to mind, I don’t know “anyway” who has done more. Doing good has no end, so the question of could more be done seems an affirmative. However it doesn’t negate what is done. The social teaching is Matthew 25, from here take a good look at the world wide Church and missionary work.

So its a false statement the Church is “mum”, in fact Pope Francis has been relentless speaking on poverty.

I wholehearted agree, but that’s not what I’m talking about at all.

When was the last time you heard or read anything from the Catholic Church specifically on the extreme plight of the starvation of children? Don’t get me wrong, as a child (I’m now 59) I remember seeing a lot on TV and magazines about the starving children in the world, but no more. Now compare that to the same information on the plight of immigrants. This is what I’m talking about.

LOVE! :heart:

What exactly are you talking about, I don’t want to put words in your mouth.

Today, and everyday, and as long as I can remember.

Why would I want to compare apples to oranges?

I’m not sure what you are referring to. In Australia, the Catholic Church is at the forefront of volunteer food service to needy families and the homeless. In the State I live in part of the curriculum in Catholic high schools is to volunteer with Catholic agencies that service the poor and needy.

Why do you use the English term ‘mum’ to signify withholding of charity? How offensive to the English, Scottish, Irish, Welsh, New Zealand and Australian members of the forum. Mums are awesome in our countries!!

Amen, Same here in the states.

“The Church is herself a missionary disciple” Pope Francis.

vatican.va/holy_father/francesco/apost_exhortations/documents/papa-francesco_esortazione-ap_20131124_evangelii-gaudium_en.html

focus.org/blog/posts/evangelii-gaudium-summary-pope-francis.html

In my lifetime I’ve known the Church to be mocked or criticised for many things, many by secular bias and some, even fairly (child abuse). I’ve never heard it criticised for its domestic charity though… especially not from within the fold. Most people see the Catholic Churchs contribution to domestic poverty as fairly stellar. I’ve many friends and acquaintances who devote their free hours to such works without pay or credit for years on end. God bless the Catholic charities of the world and their selfless volunteers. Angels that they are. :angel1:

I’m talking about the differential information made available to immigrants and the the starvation of children.

I only wish I could say the same, but I never hear anything about the starving children of the world.

How are they be apples and oranges if they both deal with plight of people?

LOVE! :heart:

But I’m not talking about Catholic charities; they do a GREAT job.

LOVE! :heart:

But I’m not talking about Catholic charities; they do a GREAT job.

So sorry. I never for a moment knew it was offensive.

LOVE! :heart:

My title should have read: "Why is the Catholic Church so talkative about the awful plight of immigrants, but quiet on the extreme plight of the starvation of children?

Sorry for any confusion this might have caused.

LOVE! :heart:

No one I know here in England sees it as offensive. I say it myself. So it’s the first I’ve heard that it’s offensive.

Immigrants are not exclusive to poverty and starvation.

The social mission of the Church is lived worldwide. That you haven’t heard about it doesn’t make it not so.

Here you admit the mission is inclusive of both, then why create a dichotomy to specifically place a false sense of more or less emphasis on apples or oranges?

Your article doesn’t make your case. And cryptic language doesn’t help explain your point.

I don’t get what you mean by “children”. What children? Children from Africa? Children from child labor? Or children in general?

How did I imply that?

Yet again, I’m not talking about Catholic charities.

How did I infer that the “mission is inclusive of both” if I’m not even talking about missions?

LOVE! :heart:

Robert,
Most Catholics know about children starving overseas, but here in the US, immigration keeps popping up as a political issue, and there are some priests who feel strongly about this and preach about it.

However, if you are hearing quite a bit about immigration from the pulpit at Mass, this may simply be your priest or parish. OTOH, some bishops are quite involved in immigration, and the media picks up on their every statement *about immigration, *so we get a skewed idea about what “the Church” is saying. I say this because the media are not so quick at picking up statements about abc, attending Mass, etc.

OP- “concerned about the awful plight of immigrants,”

Your splitting hairs, Christ and the Church are one, the mission of the Church is one with Christ, Catholic charities are of the whole. So what specifically are you talking about?

Above, you didn’t btw, instead you split the mission of the Church which is one of the same and then categorized the importance of specifics by the dichotomy you created. Its suggestive critique which for one isn’t factual, and its judgmental without merit. The article with the same words as the OP, indicates one of the same as I showed.

OP-“the Catholic Church so concerned about the awful plight of immigrants, but mum on the extreme plight of the starvation of children”

Its your burden of proof to show this is so? So far I don’t see where this occurred? The assumption is this is a fact?

Thanks! I never heard about immigration from the pulpit, but going by what is being presented here on CAF, on EWTN or anything from Pope Francis or the rest of the Vatican. Sure Pope Francis talks a lot about poverty, but nothing that would set off an emergency alarm about the large prevalence of starvation in the world. I consider that starvation, especially that of children, to be a crime against humanity, and deserving of emergency action. Yes, it does sometimes get mentioned, but so superficially.

LOVE! :heart:

I hear FAR more from the Church about the hunger problem than I do about immigration. For immigration I think we get a letter in the bulletin once a year and that’s it; for fighting hunger they bring in a speaker once or twice a year who talks about our efforts in hungry areas and how we can help; we have blue barrels set up throughout the church to which food can be donated any time you want, and a guy picks it up weekly to take it to Catholic Charities; I hear far more about hunger than about immigrants, and I get constant opportunities to fight it. I’m surprised to hear it isn’t the same in your diocese. Are you sure it isn’t just your impression?

The Church, The Pope, and Bishops do talk about starving children but it simply doesn’t make news (secular or Catholic) because no one disagrees with helping starving children. But since ppl disagree on immigration, that’s why you hear the media reporting on it and perhaps why some Bishops / Priests deal with this issue if they are knowledgable on the topic. Also, there are many Catholics who do not understand the position of the Bishops on this issue. They agree that illegal immigration is wrong (in general it’s objectively a sin to break the law) but they often feel that immigration laws should also have ways to prioritize allowing families to stay together. Children should not be punished for the sins of the parents. Finding an answer that works is the harder part, but if both sides are working towards then it will get better. That’s what the Church wants, all people to respect the family and create laws which do not punish children for sins of parents.

God Bless

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