Why Is The Saabath On Sunday

Perhaps a ridiculous question but why is the Sabbath on Sunday? If Jesus Christ was crucified on Friday on rose 3 days later wouldn’t that put the Sabbath on Monday? My way of counting days puts it on that day. Any clarification on this would be appreciated.

John

  1. The Sabbath is still Saturday, we just worship on Sunday because of the Resurrection.

  2. It’s not “risen 3 days later,” it’s “risen on the third day.” First day = Friday, second day = Saturday, third day = Sunday.

OK, I get it now. Thanks for your reply.

John

The ancient Romans used an “inclusive” method of counting days, as opposed to what we use in contemporary English. When we say “the third day after” we exclude the day itself (in this case, Friday). In contrast, they included the reference-day; so think of it as “the third day (pause)…after the Crucifixion”

Think of the word “after” as meaning “after as opposed to before.” That might seem obvious (of course, the crucifixion happened before the Resurrection) but it’s actually relevant and important when it’s put into the perspective of how the Roman calendar worked. “After” indicates direction instead of thinking of it as “after that first day had ended.” The word “after” is telling someone which direction to count (past or future). So Friday is the first, Saturday the second, and Sunday the third.

It’s interesting when we look at how the Roman calendar worked. They counted backwards; and they included the reference-day.

Let’s say that it’s the end of October. The Romans began by looking forward to the next significant day, in this case, the Calends of November (November 1). The Calends is our reference-day.

The day before the Calends of November is the “eve of the Calends” (Oct 31)

The day before that is the “third day before the Calends of November” (Oct 30)

Today (what we call October 27) is actually the “sixth day before the Calends of November” which seems rather odd to us because if we count forward and think "so that makes tomorrow the fifth day…etc. etc…) it turns out that there is no “second day before the Calends” because we go from “the third day before” immediately to the “eve”—there is no “second day before.” Why? because they include the reference-day when they count. There was no “second day before” because that was called “the eve”–although we could call that the “day before” or maybe the “first day before.”

The same thing happens at Easter, in the opposite direction. In our typical contemporary usage, we would call Divine Mercy Sunday, the “first Sunday after Easter” because we think to ourselves that this is the first time we have a Sunday after Easter is over. But that’s not how it works in Latin. Divine Mercy is actually called the Second Sunday after Easter because the reference-day of Easter Sunday is included.

wynd,
re: “The Sabbath is still Saturday, we just worship on Sunday because of the Resurrection.”

Just so it’s understood that there is no scripture that says that anyone observed the first day of the week for rest and worship because of the resurrection.

Acts 20, gathering to break bread has always been synonymous with worship in Christianity.

7 On the first day of the week* when we gathered to break bread, Paul spoke to them because he was going to leave on the next day, and he kept on speaking until midnight.

Corinthians 16:

2 On the first day of the week each of you should set aside and save whatever one can afford, so that collections will not be going on when I come.

What would it matter what day of the week they were collecting on, unless they were already gathered together every first day of the week for…?

Now while there is no specific scripture where the Lord’s day (Sunday) is specifically called that because that is the day Christ rose, we do know from the writings of the early fathers that the Church called it the Lord’s day because it was the day He rose.

It becomes exceedingly clear that they were gathering on the first day (Sunday), and they were gathering to worship (breaking bread), and Paul never says anything against what they are doing.

Duane1966,
re: “Now while there is no specific scripture where the Lord’s day (Sunday) is specifically called that because that is the day Christ rose…”

Nor is there any scripture that ever calls the first day of the week the “Lord’s Day”. But I wasn’t commenting on that. I was merely pointing out that scripture never says that anyone got together on the first day of the week in honor of the resurrection. I think there may be some who think that it does.

Scripture confirms that Christians regularly gathered together on the first day of the week (Sunday) for a Eucharistic rite (breaking of the bread), and I am confident in calling it a rite given Paul’s corrections to the Corinthians on how it should be celebrated.

Another first century document, the Didache, affirms that Christians gathered together every “Lord’s Day” to break bread and give thanksgiving and confess transgressions, which affirms Paul’s statements on the gatherings and why he’d instruct a charitable collection to be made on Sunday (the day they gathered together).

Jesus also “comes” on Sunday, making his first appearance to the disciples on that day, and another appearance on the same day the next week.

The reason for Sunday being the Lord’s Day is easily recognized as being preserved in tradition. It’s not an innovation.

Wesrock,
re: “Scripture confirms that Christians regularly gathered together on the first day of the week…”

Actually, as far as scripture is concerned, there are only two times mentioned with regard to anybody being together on the first (day) of the week - John 20:19 and Acts 20:7. There is never any mention of anyone ever again being together on the first.

The John reference has them together in a closed room after the crucifixion because they were afraid of their fellow Jews. Nothing is said about a worship service or day of rest. And it couldn’t have been to honor the resurrection because at that point they didn’t even know/believe that the resurrection had occurred.

The Acts reference very likely had the disciples gathered because Paul was in town and he wanted to talk to them before he had to leave again. The breaking of bread mentioned (even if it were referring to the Lord’s Supper) had nothing to do with placing a special emphasis on the first (day) because Acts 2:46 says that they broke bread every day.

Jesus appeared to the disciples on the day of his rising (John 20:19) and again the following Sunday (John 20:26). I never stated that the disciples were gathered here for worship. I only pointed out that Sunday was the day that Jesus first came to the disciples. He also appeared to his disciples on the road to Emmaus the first Sunday of his resurrection (Luke 24:13). Pentecost was also on a Sunday. Again, never said these particular gatherings were for worship, but they mark important days, including Christ’s appearances and the birth of the Church.

Also, I was mixing Acts 20:7 and 1 Corinthians 11:17-34, though for good reason. Acts 20:7 speaks of the gathering to break the bread as being on a Sunday very matter of factly, and 1 Corinthians 11 speaks of this gathering as having a cultic importance. The Didache (first century document) and early Church fathers support these readings and confirms Christians regularly gathered on Sunday.

Acts 2:46 seems to be speaking of something different, in context, merely about communal fellowship meals and communal fellowship in general, not Communion as described in 1 Corinthians 11. The term is being used in a general sense. People can congress, but the United States has a Congress. We can have supper, of we can have THE Supper (the marriage banquet of the lamb).

Scripture shouldn’t be interpreted by itself as if it just appeared in the current century. It needs to be interpreted in the context of Christian tradition.

:thumbsup:

.And Catholics still do, in obedience to the scriptures. In fact there is probably a Mass being celebrated somewhere in the world all the time, so it’s a constant worship worldwide.

Good point, Church Militant.

Remember the sabbath day, to keep it holy. Six days you shall labor, and do all your work; but the seventh day is a sabbath to the Lord your God; in it you shall not do any work, you, or your son, or your daughter, your manservant, or your maidservant, or your cattle, or the sojourner who is within your gates; for in six days the Lord made heaven and earth, the sea, and all that is in them, and rested the seventh day; therefore the Lord blessed the sabbath day and hallowed it. (Exodus 20:8-11)

Observe the sabbath day, to keep it holy, as the Lord your God commanded you. Six days you shall labor, and do all your work; but the seventh day is a sabbath to the Lord your God; in it you shall not do any work, you, or your son, or your daughter, or your manservant, or your maidservant, or your ox, or your [donkey], or any of your cattle, or the sojourner who is within your gates, that your manservant and your maidservant may rest as well as you. You shall remember that you were a servant in the land of Egypt, and the Lord your God brought you out thence with a mighty hand and an outstretched arm; therefore the Lord your God commanded you to keep the sabbath day. (Deuteronomy 5:12-15)

From the first passage (Exodus), it can be seen that a weekly holy day was designed after the work-rest pattern of God, who created the universe over the course of six days and then rested on the seventh day. (Genesis 2:1-3)

From the second passage (Deuteronomy), it can be seen that, as part of the Old Covenant, God commanded that the Jews observe Saturday as their weekly holy day because the Jews were miraculously liberated by God from their Egyptian slavery on a Saturday.

That part of the Old Covenant, the observance of a weekly holy day on Saturday, like circumcision and kosher food laws, was abrogated when the New Covenant was established by Jesus Christ. Instead, Sunday was established by the New Covenant Church as their weekly holy day because mankind was miraculously liberated from their slavery to sin and death when Jesus definitively rose from the dead on a Sunday.

That the Old Covenant requirement concerning the observance of a weekly holy day on Saturday was abrogated when the New Covenant was established can be seen in the absence of any explicit command by Jesus or his Apostles to observe the Sabbath and by the words of St Paul against judging others on the basis of whether or not they observe Jewish holy days and his condemnation of those who thought the observance of Jewish holy days was absolutely necessary to salvation:
Therefore let no one pass judgment on you in questions of food and drink or with regard to a festival or a new moon or a sabbath. These are only a shadow of what is to come; but the substance belongs to Christ. (Colossians 2:16-17)

Who are you to pass judgment on the servant of another? It is before his own master that he stands or falls. And he will be upheld, for the Master is able to make him stand. One man esteems one day as better than another, while another man esteems all days alike. Let every one be fully convinced in his own mind. He who observes the day, observes it in honor of the Lord. … Why do you pass judgment on your brother? (Romans 14:4-6,10)

You observe days, and months, and seasons, and years! I am afraid I have labored over you in vain. (Galatians 4:10-11)

  1. Where does the Decalogue state that what we term as ‘Saturday’ is the Sabbath? 2. Jesus taught that the Apostles would be thrown out of the synagogues, i.e. the Sabbath/Temple worship was passing away. 3. Jesus rose from the dead on the first day of the week - the greatest event in human history. 4. The Holy Spirit descended upon the Apostles, giving birth to the Church, on the first day of the week. 5. The Apostles met on the first day of the week - the proto-mass. 6. The Apostle John received the Revelation on Sunday. 7. Chapter 14 of the Didache (“Teaching of the Twelve Apostles”), written during the life of the Apostle John, documents gathering on the Lord’s day. 8. The Church, unlike all “denominations/non-denominations” has the absolute power of binding and loosing. 9. The Apostles held Sunday to be the day of liturgical worship, and thus it is bound in heaven.

Truthfully, on which day are we NOT supposed to worship? To belong to a community that has no power of binding and loosing causes confusion - we see that here constantly. To bind oneself or one’s community to the fragmentary written Tradition that we know as the scriptures leads to discord, division, dissension and error, each and every time. How many times must this be proven? It does not matter how certain one is that he or she is right. What matters is the truth.

po18guy,

None of your 9 points include any scriptures which say that anyone was meeting on the first day of the week because of the resurrection. Again, I was simply pointing out that scripture never says that anyone got together on the first day of the week in honor of the resurrection. I think there are some who think that it does.

BTW, your 6th point that the apostle John received the Revelation on Sunday is also not stated anywhere in scripture.

Great points Todd. Thanks.
Just to add more, Scott Hahn shows how in John’s Gospel he shows how there is a new creation, and so we have a new Seventh Day that is even better than the Sabbath of the Old. (in keeping with forum rules, I will not copy and paste the whole page, but here are the notes if you wish to read them.
See New Seventh Day.

Yes. Good point.
I think the Old Covenant Sabbath was just a shadow, or type of the new day to come in the New Covenant.

Rstrats, I admit you have sort of a good point, but with the way you phrase it, technically your wrong.
Revelation 1:10
“I was in the Spirit on the Lord’s day, and I heard behind me a loud voice like a trumpet…” RSV

John tells us he received a revelation on the Lord’s Day. By definition the Lord’s Day is Sunday.
So, 1. John does call this first day of the week “Lord’s Day”.
So, 2. Since the Lord’s Day means the First day of the week, John does tells us it was on Sunday. We just have to use correct definition.

I would have preferred you to say, that the Bible does not define that the Lord’s Day is the first Day of the week.

However,
Every reference to the “Lord’s day” in the early Church was to the First Day of the week. No instance can be sited to disprove that. The book of Revelation was written by Saint John. For an explanation of the “Lord’s Day” see the quote listed below by Saint Ignatius, the bishop of Antioch, who was also a disciple of Saint John.
(In keep with forum rules, I will just show the web page rather than copy and paste the whole page.)

Early Writers In The Church

.

The new law requires you to keep perpetual sabbath, and you, because you are idle for one day, suppose you are pious, not discerning why this has been commanded you.

JM

Moreover, all those righteous men already mentioned, though they kept no Sabbaths, were pleasing to God

JM

The sabbath prevented people from committing evil acts, a memory to God.

Saturday was not moved to Sunday. Instead Saturday became perpetual all week, and the Lords day arose prominent.

Where does the bible state that it contains all revelation?

It does not.

Where does it state that all revelation must be found only in written form?

It does not.

Where does the bible state that the total of God’s revelation is confined, as if in a prison cell, to the written page?

It does not.

Since the scriptures do not contain your personal demands, from whence have they come?

From man. Or woman. Not from Christ. Not from the Apostles He sent. This is problematic.

Protestants, including Seventh Day Adventists and other Sabbatarian sects, although not Lutheran, are held in bondage to Luther’s personal doctrine of “bible alone” and have no authority of binding and loosing (Matthew 16:18, 18:18). Nevertheless, let us examine the scriptures.

Revelation 1:10 “I was in the spirit on the Lord’s day, and heard behind me a great voice, as of a trumpet,”

Acts 20:7 "And upon the first day of the week, when the disciples came together to break bread, Paul preached unto them, ready to depart on the morrow; and continued his speech until midnight.

1 Corinthians 16:1-2 “Now concerning the collection for the saints, as I have given order to the churches of Galatia, even so do ye. Upon the first day of the week let every one of you lay by him in store, as God hath prospered him, that there be no gatherings when I come.”

The Didache, the most ancient known catechism of the Apostolic Christian faith (70-90 AD) - during the life of the Apostle John, clearly states that liturgical worship was to occur on the first day of the week:

“But every Lord’s day gather yourselves together, and break bread, and give thanksgiving after having confessed your transgressions, that your sacrifice may be pure. But let no one that is at variance with his fellow come together with you, until they be reconciled, that your sacrifice may not be profaned. For this is that which was spoken by the Lord: In every place and time offer to me a pure sacrifice; for I am a great King, says the Lord, and my name is wonderful among the nations.”

The Apostle John, the Apostle Paul and Luke in the bible, as well as the written instructions of the Apostles indisputably demonstrate that liturgical worship was on the first day of the week - the Lord’s day. Not man’s day, not the Jewish Sabbath, but the Lord’s day. One thousand six hundred and fifty one years later, by privately interpreting the scriptures, Dr. Peter Chamberlen (or John Trask/wife in 1617) in Britain changed all that. One thousand eight hundred sixty three years later, again by privately interpreting the scriptures, Ellen Gould White in the United States agreed and overturned all that had gone before. Never mind what Christ’s Apostles had taught by the Holy Spirit.

Problem. The Apostolic faith is not “Made in the UK” or “Made in USA”, as that is not biblical.

po18guy,
re: “Where does the bible state that it contains all revelation? It does not.”

I’m not saying that observing the first day of the week instead of the seventh day of the week because of the resurrection isn’t a divinely revealed Extra-Canonical approved activity or that the phrase “Lord’s Day” definitely cannot refer to the first day of the week - although I think the better case can be made that it doesn’t. And I’m not denying the TRADITIONS of the Catholic Church concerning these issues. So again, I was merely pointing out that scripture doesn’t say it just in case there are some here who think that it does.

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