Why isn't the Divine Mercy Painting Image displayed more or always on church walls?

The image given to us ‘by God’… unto St. Faustina and usually seen easily near Easter time in the church, is such a powerful message. Why not show and endorse this image much more within the church or anywhere? The image may even soften the more hardend hearts of non-catholic vistors and friends. Sometimes a picture is worth 1000 words, this picture is way beyond that not to mention the total message of the Divine Mercy and Rosary prayers. (secular vernacular: It might just Rock your world) :cool:

See weblink photos at: www.marian.org/divinemercy/
(www.google.com search 'Divine Mercy Image)

[quote=Robert Parsons]The image given to us ‘by God’… unto St. Faustina and usually seen easily near Easter time in the church, is such a powerful message. Why not show and endorse this image much more within the church or anywhere? The image may even soften the more hardend hearts of non-catholic vistors and friends. Sometimes a picture is worth 1000 words, this picture is way beyond that not to mention the total message of the Divine Mercy and Rosary prayers. (secular vernacular: It might just Rock your world) :cool:
[/quote]

For a non-catholic that needs her heart softened could you please supply a link to the picture that you describe…thank you.:slight_smile:

Try www.newjerusalem.com/image.htm
for nice images to choose from and download, very colorful too. The other site I mentioned did not show the best image.

Doing the www.google.com search and type in Divine Mercy Image you will find plenty to see and or buy etc.

Bob

Our parish has a shrine to the Divine Mercy! This is my favorite devotion of all.

I love devine mercy. i loved it so much, as wel as St Faustina, that I took her name for confirmation. Faustina. beautiful name, and i am also reading her diary. the image of devine mercy DEFINITELY needs to be displayed a lot more. it is suh a comforting picture. it has so much to say, if only we would listen.

Thanks for replies, I am totally enamored with this image and has a message of mercy, compassion and love all given to us without measure. A hardened criminal might even drop to his knees when contemplating upon this image. I am going to look into seeing if the internet has Christmas cards with this image. I have the diary and read it too, I see why Pope John Paul II had her cannonized and a current saint in our church, f-a-b-u-l-ous. Kramerbaby great confirmation name in choosing Faustina, since I am a newer catholic (2004-2005 Easter) via RCIA-Baptized, Confirmed, chose the name (Jeremiah), at age 53-54 and now perhaps first catholic in my family, atleast that I know of. As you can see I also am not without humor and fun along the way, some things are better not changed too like humor. Our church has it up at Easter near the lobby and entrances. Wish to see it every time I enter church.

Our Parish has a painting of the Divine Mercy. Father had an artist paint it on our confessional doors…awesome! It is painted with Christ centered on the door of the Priest Confessor and the Ray’s of Mercy extend out to the doors on both sides, which are the Penetant’s confessionals.

Now that is superb, if you ever can get a digital photo and share it here that would sweet for all to see. This would have to be a plus for getting the flock into the confessional. Thanks for mentioning that.

Well, I think that there are a few reasons for this. One is that popular devotion to the Divine Mercy under this present form is still awful new to many people and priests. Afterall, this particular devotion was even suspended by the Church for awhile, even after the message had spread. Also, considering that much of the popularization has come about through the help of EWTN I suspect that many priests and bishops hold a certain degree of grudge and suspicion. Further, realize that the whole idea of such popular devotions went out the window in many a place following the Second Vatican Council, so at some parishes this might be seen as old and arcane. It is even possible that certain elements within the Church associate it with a Polish and “conservative” worldview of the last pope which they don’t care for. Finally, devotion to the Divine Mercy actually HAS been popular within the Church for a long time. Parishes might not have a Divine Mercy image, but they could well have an image of the Sacred Heart. In essence, the message is the same. Though, admittedly, with all of the iconoclasm of recent decades, it might be hard to find ANY images of whatever sort.

one reason may be that there seems to be a trend or rule of thumb in decorating churches today to avoid “a multiplicity of images or symbols” in other words, only one statue of Mary, only one image of Jesus, besides the Crucifix, such as a statue of the Sacred Heart (which represents the same attribute as does the Divine Mercy). The reason in our Church is there is simply no wall space due to the way the church is constructed, windows etc. to allow another image. It should probably be planned when the church is built or renovated. My former pastor simply dislikes the most popular Divine Mercy image on its artistic merits. I concur with his opinion. Undoubtedly Sr. Faustina faithfully conveyed what she saw to the artist, but in my opinion the artist failed in his execution. It is the same reason I dislike many current images of Our Lady of Guadalupe I see in many churches, they simply fail to render what one sees on the original, specifically, she does not look Indian and her facial expression is wrong.

In our Church we have a painting under the statue of the Sacred Heart.

I have one in my bedroom on the closet door for when I wake up between 3-4 am. I can see it faintly by the street lights.

Many priests still do not know much about the devotion and Promises of Mercy Sunday. We should talk to our priests to find out how much they know and promote Mercy Sunday to them and to fellow parishioners.

Talking to people one-to-one is a good way and give them a pamphlet to read.

We don’t have a painting/image of the Divine Mercy at the church.

It doesn’t seem to be as “in” here in the UK - but I haven’t travelled through much of catholicism here so don’t know. Maybe it’s because it’s still a new thing.

I might suggest the church getting one and to open the church at 3pm at least on the Feast of Divine Mercy for the chaplet. I wouldn’t mind leading it.

At home I have the image above my bed, in both missals, in the Bible, 4 times in the study, on a lapel badge and on a keyring!

[quote=puzzleannie] My former pastor simply dislikes the most popular Divine Mercy image on its artistic merits. I concur with his opinion. Undoubtedly Sr. Faustina faithfully conveyed what she saw to the artist, but in my opinion the artist failed in his execution.
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St. Faustina would probably agree with you. The artistic merits aren’t faultless. When she visited the artist who painted the first image she “saw that it was not as beautiful as Jesus is. I felt very sad about it, but I hid this deep in my heart.”

Later she asked the Lord, “Who will paint you as beautiful as you are?”

Then she heard the words: “Not in the beauty of the color, nor of the brush lies the greatness of this image, but in My grace.”

(paragraph 313, (134) of the Diary of Faustina)

We had one displayed on the wall behind the lectern, which was given to our then Priest as a gift, and he always did the Divine Mercy Sunday’s. He had a great devotion to the Divine Mercy as he had spent some time being a Priest in Poland, he would always talk about praying the Divine Mercy chaplet.

He came back for a visit and found that the picture had dissapeard, and apparently some of the parishioners complained that the picture was obstructing their view of a pattern on the wall and the picture has now been allocated to the back of the Church.

A group of us are petitioning to have it restored back to it’s original place.

Wishing you good fortunes in your petitioning.

Another reason could be that this is a private revelation and therefore not binding upon anyone.

It is also, mostly, a private devotion. While Divine Mercy Sunday (I believe that is the Sunday following Easter) in the Latin Church is optional, it is not mandatory and does not apply to the Eastern Catholic Churches in any way.

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