Why so stressful?

I was wondering to myself, why does it take sooooo long just to join the CC?:confused: I mean, if someone decides to join a Protestant church or whatever, it doesn’t take as long.

If you want to join the CC, you have to do all this stuff, take classes that could last for 7 billion years, etc. etc. etc.!!!

Is it because this is the TRUE Church and you must make commitments to be part of the TRUE Church? If that’s the case, I can see why…the CC takes stuff very seriously which is a good thing!

Nicole

The way I understand it, RCIA is preparation to recieve the sacraments. In the eyes of the church, all Christian baptisms are valid. This means all Christians are actually Catholic (whether they know it or not) because of their baptisms. The people of other denominations fail to recieve all the benefits of the church, such as Holy Eucharist, and attending Mass.

The church requires education before recieving first Holy Communion and Confirmation, regardless of what age you are. Seven year olds must go to many classes before they recieve first Holy Communion, and 13 year olds must go to many classes before they are confirmed.

Your’e getting your education as an adult, instead of in grade school like cradle Catholics do.

Hope that helps.

Nicole,

Glad to see you are still here! In the days when the Church was outlawed and Christians were persecuted for their beliefs, it was very important to discern that the person joining the church was doing so because of their beliefs. It is not unthinkable that members of the ruling government probably tried to infiltrate the church. The long process of discernment gave the church leaders an opportunity to check everybody out. I’m sure, of course, that there are other reasons why the wait is so long.

I waited 6 months from the day of my first RCIA class to my very first communion, but it was well worth the wait.

Best Wishes,

Frank

[quote=Paris Blues]I was wondering to myself, why does it take sooooo long just to join the CC?:confused: I mean, if someone decides to join a Protestant church or whatever, it doesn’t take as long.

If you want to join the CC, you have to do all this stuff, take classes that could last for 7 billion years, etc. etc. etc.!!!

Is it because this is the TRUE Church and you must make commitments to be part of the TRUE Church? If that’s the case, I can see why…the CC takes stuff very seriously which is a good thing!

Nicole
[/quote]

Matters pertaining to the Eternal as serious matters. If one wishes to join in a card game one only needs to know the rules of the game. They can drop out at any time without any real consequences. However when one makes promises to God the creator and then goes back on them or drops out altogether that is serious. It is very important to the Catholic Church that one who wishes to become part of the Mystical Body of Christ know why and seriously consider what and why they are taking these steps. It is also important that the Church protect it’s other members from harm by someone entering the fold as a wolf in sheep’s clothing. When entering you cannot bring a foreign Gospel with you.

[quote=nobody]This means all Christians are actually Catholic (whether they know it or not) because of their baptisms. The people of other denominations fail to recieve all the benefits of the church, such as Holy Eucharist, and attending Mass.
QUOTE]

Whoa…so that means that ALL Christians - whether real Catholic or Protestant - are Catholic? :confused:
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It the very early Church, one might remain a catechumen for many years before being admitted to the sacraments. If anything, the process we now have is abbreviated.

As my understanding, yeah, if they have a valid baptism. That is why many converts from other churches don’t need to be re-baptised. That is why we call non-catholics “seperated bethren.” That is what makes me so sad they don’t know Truth :frowning:

[quote=Paris Blues]I was wondering to myself, why does it take sooooo long just to join the CC?:confused: I mean, if someone decides to join a Protestant church or whatever, it doesn’t take as long.

If you want to join the CC, you have to do all this stuff, take classes that could last for 7 billion years, etc. etc. etc.!!!

Is it because this is the TRUE Church and you must make commitments to be part of the TRUE Church? If that’s the case, I can see why…the CC takes stuff very seriously which is a good thing!

Nicole
[/quote]

No pain, no gain.

[quote=alyssa]As my understanding, yeah, if they have a valid baptism. That is why many converts from other churches don’t need to be re-baptised. That is why we call non-catholics “seperated bethren.” That is what makes me so sad they don’t know Truth :frowning:
[/quote]

Truth? Since I don’t know a whole lot about Christianity and stuff - not even Protestantism! - how are Protestants going away from the Truth then? This is something I don’t quite get or understand totally. :o

[quote=Paris Blues]I was wondering to myself, why does it take sooooo long just to join the CC?:confused: I mean, if someone decides to join a Protestant church or whatever, it doesn’t take as long.

If you want to join the CC, you have to do all this stuff, take classes that could last for 7 billion years, etc. etc. etc.!!!

Is it because this is the TRUE Church and you must make commitments to be part of the TRUE Church? If that’s the case, I can see why…the CC takes stuff very seriously which is a good thing!

Nicole
[/quote]

Nicole–

I just wanted to welcome you and send prayers your way for a fruitful journey.

I am a cradle Catholic and have been on this journey for 43 years. The lessons never end so I hope you are ready for the long haul.:wink:

But, know that your reward will be great.:slight_smile:

Nicole, the Catholic Church is guided by the Holy Spirit. When you read in John chap 16 about the “Spirit of truth, he will guide you to all truth”. You need to keep this in context. The audience is the Church leadership, not the masses. Jesus promises the Church leadership that THEY will be lead by the Holy Spirit to all truth. Since Jesus only established one Church every Christian belongs to that Church. Catholic, means universal, as people began to develop their own separate ideas they diverged from the teachings of the one Holy Catholic and Apostolic Church. Some remain very close, so they teach “most” of the truth, but may have some false teachings, the further away from the Catholic Church (in doctrine) the less they are lead by the Holy Spirit and the less truth they teach. They are still “Catholic” in that they still believe in Jesus, they just make a lot of mistakes. Imagine if you will Jesus teaching us 1,000 things, and the Holy Spirit leading His Church to another 1,000 things; the Catholic Church would be the only Church to teach all 2,000 things. Another church may teach 1,500 of those things and may have an additional 100 of their own “interpretations”. A church further from the doctrine of the Catholic Church may only teach 800 of the truths, ect.

Only in a remote way. To be “Catholic” you have to know you’re Catholic; but the Church understands “one Baptism.”
[/quote]

I would suggest reading the Catechism of the Catholic Church, paragraphs 813 to 819. If you don’t have a paper copy, they have it online at USCCB.org (US Council of Catholic Bishops).

They explain much better than I could.
[/quote]

[/quote]

I would suggest reading paragraphs 813 to 819 of the Catechism of the Catholic Church. They explain much better than me! They have it online at USCCB.org.

Peace
[/quote]

So that means I would have to read the whole entire Catechism before I can convert, right?:confused:

[quote=nobody]I would suggest reading paragraphs 813 to 819 of the Catechism of the Catholic Church. They explain much better than me! They have it online at USCCB.org.

Peace
[/quote]

link to these paragraphs: usccb.org/catechism/text/pt1sect2chpt3art9p3.htm

[quote=Paris Blues]So that means I would have to read the whole entire Catechism before I can convert, right?:confused:
[/quote]

Nicole, just to put things in perspective. It takes the cradle Catholic 7 years before they can receive Holy Communion. 15 or more years before they are Confirmed. I do not think the average RCIA program takes this long. Also, I have never read the entire Catechism (although I would love to take a class that required this). It was never required of me to read it to complete my religious instruction although I am sure my lessons came straight from it. I know when I taught a 3rd grade religion class my instruction book regularly referred to the Catechism

I am not aware that the RCIA candidate is required to read the entire Catechism before they can convert.

BTW-- I wanted to recomend a thread over at the Water Cooler forum called “RCIA Anyone?”. There are members who are journeying right now who are connecting. You may find some support in there. Good luck and God bless!

Hi Nicole!
I know that our RCIA class didn’t have us read the Catechism. I had read parts of it years ago and still like to read it . (So, I’m a geek! :D)
But it is good to read it. And I’m sure if you come to parts that are hard to understand, someone will answer it for you. Good luck!

Paris Blues,
I’m a fellow convert. I joined the Church in 2003.:smiley:

Folks have mentioned, and you already know that the time period you’re going through has a definite purpose: There’s a lot to learn about the Church! And if we’re lucky and blessed-- we’ll continue to learn until we meet our Lord in eternity.

And you are right in realizing that joining the Church is a commitment, so the Church wants its children to have full knowledge of what they are freely committing to.

But If I could throw this out from my own experience: One of the most important aspects I learned from this waiting/learning period was an introduction into spiritual patience. (because it is just an intro) It was a huge eye-opener into how much control I strive to have over **everything **vs how much I want and need to let God lead and help me. I hope that makes sense.

As to the CCC-- I wasn’t required to read it before my Confirmation, but I found that during times of stress, dryness, or any other difficulty-- just reading it became a comforting balm and a reminder of new glory ahead.

Much Peace and Prayers to you,
shannon

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