Why use salt in rituals?

What is the significance of using salt in rituals like Baptism? When is it blessed, what time of year? When oil and water are blessed? I have never seen the salt blessed or never noticed it being done but it stands to reason that it is.

I found this passage in Leviticus 2:13 but it has to do with a grain offering. This is the only passage I have found referring to salt. Is this when the practice of using salt started?

'Every grain offering of yours, moreover, you shall season with salt, so that the salt of the covenant of your God shall not be lacking from your grain offering; with all your offerings you shall offer salt."

The occult world also uses salt in rituals (not sure why). Any correlation in reasoning? * I’m not inferring Catholics are doing an occult ritual. Just curious.

dona

Salt was worth its weight in gold in the ancient world. People broke bread and shared salt as a sign of peace and friendship. Roman soldiers were paid in salt thereby giving us the term “worth his salt” even to this day. Salt was not only a seasoning, it was a necessary preservative for food.

Holy oil and holy water are blessed (and probably blessed salt) at the Chrism Mass on Wednesday in Holy Week (or at least it is here in my diocese). All parishes send representatives to the cathedral to obtain the oil and holy water needed for that parish during the next year. The cathedral also maintains stocks should a parish run out. The priests of the diocese (again, at least in my diocese) renew their vows at this Mass as well.

Salt is, or was, usually exorcised and blessed on Sundays with the blessing of Holy Water before the Asperges.

It was originally used in the Latin rite of Baptism. The Priest would put a few grains in the mouth of the Baptizand, saying, “Receive the salt of wisdom, that you may have the taste for things of God”.

It may also be used for any pious purpose by the faithful as a sacramental.

It completes the symbolism of the elements.

The four elements: Earth, Air, Water, Fire. Some might include a fifth, Spirit.

Water is obvious.
Salt = Earth.
Candles = Fire
Oil = Spirit
Air = the spoken words of the priest.

Not sure if you meant this literally or figuratively. I don’t think there was ever a time when a given weight of salt was worth equal or greater than the same weight of gold.

[quote=brotherholf]Roman soldiers were paid in salt thereby giving us the term “worth his salt” even to this day.
[/quote]

And the term “salary”. I’m kind of curious how this worked - could you just go to the market with your sack of salt, and trade half a cup for some wine, cheese, or bread, or cloth or leather, or the services of a prostitute, or whatever else soldiers were generally up to?

I haven’t been to an infant baptism in a long time. I wasn’t aware salt was no longer used. I certainly haven’t seen it used at Easter services, at least I haven’t noticed them using it.

No one has answered these other OP questions yet though??.

I found this passage in Leviticus 2:13 but it has to do with a grain offering. This is the only passage I have found referring to salt. Is this when the practice of using salt started? 'Every grain offering of yours, moreover, you shall season with salt, so that the salt of the covenant of your God shall not be lacking from your grain offering; with all your offerings you shall offer salt."

The occult world also uses salt in rituals (not sure why). Anyone know why?

dona

Please humor me about the obvious-water so I can go ‘duh!’. I would think it has to do with spirit? like baptism.

dona

I would also expect salt is involved because of Jesus’ sayings about being the “salt of the earth”. Using actual salt is a physical reminder of the spiritual reality.

The holy water. :slight_smile:

Each element is then represented.

In the Mass, you have Water (holy water), Air (incense), Earth (Eucharist), Fire (candles), Spirit (the Holy Spirit).

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