Why use the term “mortal sin” so broadly?

So recently I was listening to a traditional Catholic priest who was saying that in some cases it can be a mortal sin. After thinking about it, I was curious as to why we place sins such as thinking impure thoughts on the same level as sexual assault, rape, and murder?

Start reading at Matthew 5:27 and see what Jesus has to say.

Thank you for your reply. I am not specifically mentioning the sin of thinking impure thoughts, but rather sins such as thinking impure thoughts that don’t typically appear to be mortal. For example, some may consider theft a mortal sin, although most would consider polygamy much more severe. Why would we place them on the same severity?

I think humbleseeker’s answer still applies. Also check out what Jesus says about anger in Matthew 5:21-22

Mortal sin means that it kills you spiritually. It is not saying that these are all equivalent (at least I don’t think it is).
A sin is not just about what it does to you, it is also about how it offends God. Any mortal sin kills you spiritually, but that doesn’t necessitate that it offends God the same amount (at least I don’t think it does).
Here is an article from Catholic Answers:
https://www.catholic.com/qa/are-all-sins-equally-offensive-to-god

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That tract seems to be distinguishing between venial and mortal sin not two mortal sins.

Yes, but the example it provides can work as well, as the Scripture quoted mentioned two different mortal sins if I recall correctly.

But I am including the “I think” parts because I am not sure. After all, God’s way is higher than ours.

Consider a bell curve of wealth. You have average, above average, and below average.

Does this mean that all poor people have the same amount of money that is below average? No. Below average includes those who have $1 below the average all the way down to the homeless guy who has not a single cent.

In the same way, mortal and venial sins–or rather, grave matter and not-grave matter-- are not necessarily equivalent to the other sins in their categories. It’s just that when it comes to sin, the gradations are tempered by individual aspects as well as the type of act, so one person might sin more gravely just in his thoughts (think of someone poring over really nasty porn… ) than another who might act with too little thought or out of fear.

So we have the two important categories: grave and not-grave --objectively mortal or objectively venial–and that is all we really need.

Well sure but it’s the Catholic Church’s job in caring for the salvation of souls to identify and condemn sin.

I’m looking at a pamphlet for how to make a good confession and under the 5th commandment Thou Shall Not Kill I see arrogance, pride, vanity, anger, seeking revenge, etc.

6th commandment Thou shall not commit adultery …lack of custody of the eyes, allowing the heart to stray from spouse, failure to respect those of opposite sex, etc.

Not all mortal sins are equal. While final impenitence for any mortal sin leads to Hell, the torments in Hell are worse for more grave and more numerous sins, just like the glory in Heaven is greater for those who had greater merit.

I sure hope I haven’t implied otherwise by positing it would seem to me that not all mortal sins are equally offensive to God…they are all still mortal sins that are very offensive to Him.
In Confession, it is a good idea (though not strictly necessary) to confess venial sins as well as mortal.

Don’t want to find out lol

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