Why was the Feast of the Cirumcision done away with?


#1

Back in 1960, the Feast of the Circumcision of Jesus Christ was done away with in favor of the Solemnity of Mary, Mother of God. Does anyone know why that is? Does the Church no longer wish to celebrate Christ's circumcision?


#2

Right, probably because it is a weird thing to celebrate. In the same way, back in the 1500s you used to see paintings of the Virgin Mary with her breasts out, sometimes squirting milk into Baby Jesus’ mouth. “Blessed the paps that gave thee suck,” that sort of thing. We haven’t seen much of that for a couple of centuries either.


#3

[quote="MarkThompson, post:2, topic:309829"]
Right, probably because it is a weird thing to celebrate. In the same way, back in the 1500s you used to see paintings of the Virgin Mary with her breasts out, sometimes squirting milk into Baby Jesus' mouth. "Blessed the paps that gave thee suck," that sort of thing. We haven't seen much of that for a couple of centuries either.

[/quote]

I would agree with this answer; it is a strange event to celebrate and that is likely why it has fallen by the wayside.


#4

[quote="NovusAugustus, post:1, topic:309829"]
Back in 1960, the Feast of the Circumcision of Jesus Christ was done away with in favor of the Solemnity of Mary, Mother of God. Does anyone know why that is? Does the Church no longer wish to celebrate Christ's circumcision?

[/quote]

My guess is that circumcision is now a controversial topic to many people (people debate about whether or not it is mutilation to preform it on someone that didn't consent such as infants). You'll notice that Christ's circumcision will be mentioned in the Gospel reading during the Solemnity of Mary, Mother of God. ;)

The Melkite Catholic Church still celebrates the Feast of the Circumcision of Jesus Christ. :thumbsup:


#5

I may remember it wrong....but I seem to remember hearing that both solemnities share Jan. 1.

At different times in history, the Church has chosen to give one center stage. Right now, the Church has chosen to emphasize Mary the Mother of God and de-emphasize the Circumcision. At some other point in time, it may change.


#6

[quote="NovusAugustus, post:1, topic:309829"]
Back in 1960, the Feast of the Circumcision of Jesus Christ was done away with in favor of the Solemnity of Mary, Mother of God.

[/quote]

Not exactly. Traditionally it was sub-titled "The Octave of Christmas" and while the designation "Circumcision" was suppressed in the 1962 editio typica of the Missale Romanum, the sub-title was retained and became the primary designation of the Feast. IIRC, the newer name came in with the Novus Ordo.

[quote="Zekariya, post:4, topic:309829"]
The Melkite Catholic Church still celebrates the Feast of the Circumcision of Jesus Christ. :thumbsup:

[/quote]

Yes, and even the Maronites still have it too (well, officially at least). :)


#7

It is unfortunate that it is ignored. In a sense it marks the beginning of Christ's Passion; it is the first blood that He shed.


#8

[quote="Joe_Kelley, post:7, topic:309829"]
It is unfortunate that it is ignored. In a sense it marks the beginning of Christ's Passion; it is the first blood that He shed.

[/quote]

Also it shows that indeed Christ came as a fulfillment of the Law, not to abolish it. He set himself under the law that has been given to us by God, truly a manifestation that He has lived among us under the same yoke we are given.


#9

The day was always strongly Marian in tone (read the collects for the Mass in the EF, even when it wasstill the Circumcision, as the propers did not change in 1960, when the name changed. It also emphasized the Octave and the Circumcision.

The Circumcision was supressed at the same time that the word perfidious was dropped from the Good Friday prayer for the Jews. Both were effected as a result of Blessed John XXIII's dialogue with Jewish leaders.


#10

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