Why would she lie?


#1

This is odd. My cousin is married to a wonderful man whose mother was polish and father was puerto rican, thus their last name is Hispanic. They are catholic and have two children. The other day my cousin sent me an online resume that listed her ethnicity as Hispanic. My cousin is Irish, 100%.
I didn't bring it up to her, but feel like maybe I should have.


#2

Hello,

For what was she applying?


#3

was this information given to someone who has a right and need to know? if not, what is the problem?


#4

While it could be an honest mistake (that is, she married into the culture so she has thus adopted it as her own), it seems at least suspicious that she's looking for a hiring advantage. If that's the case, she is ill advised to do this. If any employer ever learned the truth post-hire, she could be terminated.


#5

In order to be charitable you should assume that it may have been an error, not necessarily a lie. It is also my understanding that providing this information is not mandatory so I guess I don’t see why you are upset at all. Let it go.


#6

[quote="Irish_Girl_68, post:4, topic:253342"]
While it could be an honest mistake (that is, she married into the culture so she has thus adopted it as her own), it seems at least suspicious that she's looking for a hiring advantage. If that's the case, she is ill advised to do this. If any employer ever learned the truth post-hire, she could be terminated.

[/quote]

Strangely enough, they probably couldn't fire her for it, even if it was a deliberate lie. Because information on race is protected, the part of the "application" where you can optionally list it, isn't considered part of the actual application. So even if the company had a rule that finding out later that you lied in your application was grounds for termination, they couldn't claim that you listed race on your application.

Sounds crazy but that's the PC world we live in. :D


#7

If it was for a job, in most cases it is illegal to consider ethnicity. Like one's religion, it should not be asked, revealed or discussed in the application process. But if she were applying for a grant, scholarship, organization membership or some type of private assistance, some programs are designed for people of certain ethnic or religious groups. And I would expect that there are more such programs for someone who is Hispanic than someone who has an Irish ancestry.


#8

Relax. It’s probably not a lie-like what Monicad said. It’s probably a mistake. Imagine that! We all make them! Calling someone a liar is a pretty serious charge.

Be very careful about ethnicity in the future. My sister and I have very Irish last names , and we’re both adopted. Neither one of us is Irish. She’s from Canada and I’m from the UK!


#9

I have no idea what she will be using the resume for, she just asked that I look it over for her.
I don’t think it was accidental but I could be wrong. It is awkward to be asked to review something and see what could be a mistake and not mention it.
As far as being absorbed in the culture, one of my other cousins is married to a man from Asia, but I would think it equally odd if she listed her race as Asian.


#10

Also, my husband mention the following: President Barack Obama signed an executive order Thursday directing federal officials to design a government-wide strategy for making the federal workforce more diverse.
My point of this post was that I wasn't sure if I should ask her if it was a mistake or assume it wasn't. She can be a bit confrontational and I am not at all. Also, I can't discuss it with anyone (other than my husband!) because I don't want to gossip about it.
I don't know that she is using the resume for anything. She has a great job and she and her husband are pretty well off. At least she didn't mention any job or program to me. She just sent me the link and asked me to look over it, I guess for spelling or grammar errors.


#11

It could be that the software on the site "assumed" she was hispanic.

I would give her a little chuckle, "Oh my gosh! the profile thinks you're spanish!"


#12

Is she a US citizen? In the US, it’s illegal to docoument a person’s race during the time of interview. The HR envirorments I’ve worked in would throw out that resume. It’s not information to be considered at all… We’re not even allowed to white it out, and pass it on…

From a hiring perspective I wonder a few things… 1) does this person think they deserve an advantage because of their race… And I pass. 2) This person is clueless to have indicated such information… and I pass. 3) In your case, knowing the situation. I’d really wonder about a person that think’s they are hispanic now because of their last name. and again, I’d pass…

Not sure how this pans out in other countries, where I understand such information is ok to use for the purpose of evaluation. (It used to be here, that you indicated you were married, single, divorced, in good health… etc)


#13

If she asked you to go over it you can tell her you noticed an error there, that the resume lists her as hispanic, which you would think was an error since she is Irish.

You are correct, you do not need to talk about it with anyone else, but I think it makes sense for you to bring it to her attention, not in an accusatory fashion, but as an observation of an error.


#14

[quote="Evainprayer, post:1, topic:253342"]
This is odd. My cousin is married to a wonderful man whose mother was polish and father was puerto rican, thus their last name is Hispanic. They are catholic and have two children. The other day my cousin sent me an online resume that listed her ethnicity as Hispanic. My cousin is Irish, 100%.
I didn't bring it up to her, but feel like maybe I should have.

[/quote]

Definition of ethnicity...
1. relating to or characteristic of a human group having racial, religious, linguistic, and certain other traits in common
2. relating to the classification of mankind into groups, esp on the basis of racial characteristics
3. denoting or deriving from the cultural traditions of a group of people: the ethnic dances of Slovakia
4. characteristic of another culture: the ethnic look ; ethnic food

It seems to me that since she has married into a partly Hispanic family she could certainly qualify under some of the definitions of having an ethnicity of Hispanic.

If she was trying to be dishonest that is her sin. Baring false witness against her, especially without knowing her intent certainly could become yours.

If you are curious as to why she chose to put that, why not just be upfront and ask her. It's a simple and honest enough question.


#15

By asking you to look it over, she gave you the right to state your opinion. Simply say ‘It says you are hipsanic, I was wondering why you put that there?’

If she gets defensive then simply say ‘I felt you asked me and I should give an honest answer. If you don’t want my feedback, perhaps someone else can review your resume’

I also would say ‘Unless there is an actual box on an application where you can check ‘hispanic’, giving out that information is a sure fire way to not get the job’

CM


#16

Since she has aksed you to look over it, you should certainly ask her about it.

You don’t need to accuse her of lying, but perhaps point out that if she lists her ethnicity as Hispanic it could cause confusion if she attends job interviews and does not seem to be of Hispanic descent. Perhaps it would be easier for her to leave it blank, since the last name may suggest Hispanic descent anyway but would not cause confusion when she attends for interviews.


#17

[quote="Evainprayer, post:1, topic:253342"]
This is odd. My cousin is married to a wonderful man whose mother was polish and father was puerto rican, thus their last name is Hispanic. They are catholic and have two children. The other day my cousin sent me an online resume that listed her ethnicity as Hispanic. My cousin is Irish, 100%.
I didn't bring it up to her, but feel like maybe I should have.

[/quote]

Is it really important? If you are confused, ask her about it. She'll probably tell you. I don't know why she did that, and I don't know if any of us could tell you either.


#18

#19

I could not care less about a person’t ethnicity. Other than small talk about family traditions, it really doesn’t come up in conversation a lot. My husband and I have a child who is fair skinned and one who is olive toned and it always amused us when a friend of ours would remark “I can’t help but notice your children are different colors”.
Here is what I do know. My cousin is pretty well educated (advanced degrees) and must have read and reread it before sending it to me.


#20

This post is how normal life should be. I have been in arguments with her in the past about her cafeteria catholic positions.


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