Will my baptism count?


#1

I’m currently in the RCIA at my local parish and am set to be confirmed this Easter, unlike most candidates I will be baptized as well, having never being baptized as a child.

The problem is that I’m having a bit of trouble with the method of the baptism. As I understand it the Church doesn’t practice immersion. I’m concerned that I may not feel the reel joy that most people speak of when they are baptized by immersion.

Why is it that other apostolic Churches like the Orthodox Church still immerse yet the Catholic Church does not? Can anyone help me with any recourses that may help?

Much appreciated
Levi


#2

Although this may not answer your question, it may help to shed a little light on the subject. Other Christians have claimed that Catholics invented Baptism by sprinkling in the middle ages or so. But the Didache, which is the oldest known Liturgical guide (around 70-95 AD), lists Baptism by Immersion, and Sprinkling as valid types.

Another point:
From “Apologetics and Catholic Doctrine” by Michael Sheehan:

It is not true that full immersion remained common even in the early Church: of the dozen or more 3rd and 4th century baptisteries excavated in Greece, only two have fonts a metre or so deep, and most are under 50cm, i.e., knee-deep if full. The same patterrn is true of baptisteries found in Syria, Palestine, Egypt and N. Africa. A fresco from the first half of the 3rd century in the Catacombs of St. Callistrus, Rome, shows a baptism being performed in water a few inches deep. From all these it is clear that an adult candidate stood in a shallow pool, and some water was gathered from it and poured over his head.

Sources: J.G. Davies, The Architectural Setting of Baptism, Barrie and Rockliff, London 1962; S.A. Stauffer, On the Baptismal Fonts: Ancient and Modern, Grove Books, Nottingham 1994; Bellarmino Bagatti OFM, The Church from the Circumcision: History and Archaeology of the Judaeo-Christians, Franciscan Printing Press, Jerusalem 1984, p. 245; Id., The Church from the Gentiles in Palestine: History and Archaeology, Francisc. P. Press, Jerusalem 1984, pp. 301-8.

Again, I don’t know why the Church does not do it, or even if it insists that we don’t do it. I’m under the impression that if you specifically ask the priest for immersion, and the ability to immerse is available, then they will do it. But I’m not really sure about that.

Take Care and God Bless!

Notworthy


#3

What joy? All I ever felt was really wet! :rotfl:
You can ask to be dunked.


#4

[quote=NotWorthy]Although this may not answer your question, it may help to shed a little light on the subject. Other Christians have claimed that Catholics invented Baptism by sprinkling in the middle ages or so. But the Didache, which is the oldest known Liturgical guide (around 70-95 AD), lists Baptism by Immersion, and Sprinkling as valid types.

[/quote]

The Didache says:And concerning baptism, baptize this way: Having first said all these things, baptize into the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit, in living water *. But if you have no living water, baptize into other water; and if you cannot do so in cold water, do so in warm. But if you have neither, pour out water three times upon the head into the name of Father and Son and Holy Spirit. But before the baptism let the baptizer fast, and the baptized, and whoever else can; but you shall order the baptized to fast one or two days before. (*Didache, *7)


#5

From John 13
6] He came to Simon Peter; and Peter said to him, "Lord, do you wash my feet?"
7] Jesus answered him, "What I am doing you do not know now, but afterward you will understand."
8] Peter said to him, “You shall never wash my feet.” Jesus answered him, "If I do not wash you, you have no part in me."
9] Simon Peter said to him, "Lord, not my feet only but also my hands and my head!"
10] Jesus said to him, "He who has bathed does not need to wash, except for his feet, but he is clean all over; and you are clean…

Okay, my point is, a little holy water goes a long way. :slight_smile:


#6

:rotfl:


#7

The joy comes not from being immersed but through receiving God’s grace at Baptism.

The other point regarding the method of Baptism here is that many Catholic parishes these days have a Baptismal pool. The candidates do get immersed. :slight_smile:


#8

[quote=levi86]I’m currently in the RCIA at my local parish and am set to be confirmed this Easter, unlike most candidates I will be baptized as well, having never being baptized as a child.

The problem is that I’m having a bit of trouble with the method of the baptism. As I understand it the Church doesn’t practice immersion. I’m concerned that I may not feel the reel joy that most people speak of when they are baptized by immersion.

Why is it that other apostolic Churches like the Orthodox Church still immerse yet the Catholic Church does not? Can anyone help me with any recourses that may help?

Much appreciated
Levi
[/quote]

Eastern Rite Catholics do baptise by immersion. Not to pick this apart or anything, but the Catholic Church does do baptism by immersion, just not our Latin-rite. The only thing Jesus tells us to to is to baptize in the name of the Father, Son and Holy Spirit. He does not say the method has to be immersion. You will born again of water and spirit… don’t worry.


#9

I was baptized through sprinkling as a teenager, and it was an overwhelming spiritual experience - one of great awe and wonder. Also, Ezekeel 36:25a says, “I will sprinkle clean water on you, and you will be clean.” Your baptizm will count. May the Lord bless you richly as you draw closer to Him in the Church established by His Son.


#10

[quote=x4us]I was baptized through sprinkling as a teenager, and it was an overwhelming spiritual experience - one of great awe and wonder. Also, Ezekeel 36:25a says, “I will sprinkle clean water on you, and you will be clean.” Your baptizm will count. May the Lord bless you richly as you draw closer to Him in the Church established by His Son.
[/quote]

x4us

Thank you so much, that is exactly what I needed hear. :slight_smile:

God Bless
Levi


#11

Hi there Levi!..

’m currently in the RCIA at my local parish and am set to be confirmed this Easter, unlike most candidates I will be baptized as well, having never being baptized as a child.

Congratulations and Welcome! Yes, your Baptism will count be it baptism on the head only or full immersion.

The problem is that I’m having a bit of trouble with the method of the baptism. As I understand it the Church doesn’t practice immersion. I’m concerned that I may not feel the reel joy that most people speak of when they are baptized by immersion.

May The Lord grant you great joy at your Baptism this coming Easter and no matter what ritual of Baptism is used. Amen.

Why is it that other apostolic Churches like the Orthodox Church still immerse yet the Catholic Church does not? Can anyone help me with any recourses that may help?

I think that some Churches do have a provision for full immersion but am unsure, while our Parish (South Australia) does have in the Baptismal area a bowl set into the floor and the Baptismal water is poured on the head of a standing candidate who is dressed in a plain long white garment which the Parish provides. Another parish where I have witnessed a Baptism used a large bowl for the same purpose including the white garment.

Send regards to you and much joy on your coming Baptism…may 2006 prove to be a year of many blessings and consolations. :wave:

Barb


#12

[quote=levi86]I’m currently in the RCIA at my local parish and am set to be confirmed this Easter, unlike most candidates I will be baptized as well, having never being baptized as a child.

The problem is that I’m having a bit of trouble with the method of the baptism. As I understand it the Church doesn’t practice immersion. I’m concerned that I may not feel the reel joy that most people speak of when they are baptized by immersion.

Why is it that other apostolic Churches like the Orthodox Church still immerse yet the Catholic Church does not? Can anyone help me with any recourses that may help?

Much appreciated
Levi
[/quote]

The Roman Catholic Church had three methods that were licit for Baptism. Immersion (dunking), effusion (pouring), sprinkling (aspersion). The Last was removed in the current Canon Law because it left a great margin of error possible in some of the ways it was used. That leaves two possible ways to be Baptized, Immersion or Pouring. Many parishes simply do not have the ability to immerse an adult.


#13

[quote=BarbaraTherese]Hi there Levi!..
[/quote]

Congratulations and Welcome! Yes, your Baptism will count be it baptism on the head only or full immersion.

May The Lord grant you great joy at your Baptism this coming Easter and no matter what ritual of Baptism is used. Amen.

I think that some Churches do have a provision for full immersion but am unsure, while our Parish (South Australia) does have in the Baptismal area a bowl set into the floor and the Baptismal water is poured on the head of a standing candidate who is dressed in a plain long white garment which the Parish provides. Another parish where I have witnessed a Baptism used a large bowl for the same purpose including the white garment.

Send regards to you and much joy on your coming Baptism…may 2006 prove to be a year of many blessings and consolations. :wave:

Barb

Just a note:

For proper symbolism the white garment is not put on until AFTER the person is Baptized. For those in RCIA please do not dress in white before your Baptism.


#14

[quote=Br. Rich SFO]Just a note:

For proper symbolism the white garment is not put on until AFTER the person is Baptized. For those in RCIA please do not dress in white before your Baptism.
[/quote]

Thank you for pointing out correct procedure Bro. Rich…here after the baptism the baptized person puts on their own dry clothing and is presented with a white stole. But I do thank you for the correct procedure and I can insight the logic and theology.

Happy New Year:)

Regards Barb


#15

BarbaraTherese

Thank you for your input, it is much appreciated. I think I’m a bit more comfortable with the sprinkling now, but it would still be nice to have that immersion available.

I’m sure if its done in SA the same would go for us over here in Western Australia.

Happy New Year
Levi


#16

[quote=levi86]BarbaraTherese

Thank you for your input, it is much appreciated. I think I’m a bit more comfortable with the sprinkling now, but it would still be nice to have that immersion available.

I’m sure if its done in SA the same would go for us over here in Western Australia.

Happy New Year
Levi
[/quote]

A fellow Aussie…pleased to meecha Levi!.:wave: …been to Perth and capital of Western Australia - beautiful city indeed!
I am sure since it is done here in South Australia that it probably could be done in WA…depending on your Bishop’s decision on the point I should imagine. I did appreciate Bro. Rich’s input that the correct symbolism would involve a white garment being worn after the Baptism rather than before and during since the soul after Baptism is just about as pure as a soul can get!..all sin is erased as if it never existed by Baptism - and Ol Nick gets the shock of its life to boot…since it is booted completely out of the picture well and truly.:rotfl:

I shall remember you joyously this Easter!..and welcome indeed to this the motely crew! and we were from the very beginning and the first twelve!..
I am so happy that this thread has enabled you to feel more comfort on the ritual side of your coming Baptism…and may The Lord fill you at that moment with joy fit to raise the ceiling!!!

Regards Barb


#17

[quote=levi86]I’m currently in the RCIA at my local parish and am set to be confirmed this Easter, unlike most candidates I will be baptized as well, having never being baptized as a child.

The problem is that I’m having a bit of trouble with the method of the baptism. As I understand it the Church doesn’t practice immersion. I’m concerned that I may not feel the reel joy that most people speak of when they are baptized by immersion.

Why is it that other apostolic Churches like the Orthodox Church still immerse yet the Catholic Church does not? Can anyone help me with any recourses that may help?

Much appreciated
Levi
[/quote]

number one, all such questions should be directed to those directing your RCIA process, that is what they are there for. They can tell you in due time what will happen at the Easter Vigil, emphasis on “in due time”. We prefer to prepare but not to “rehearse” because you experience the sacraments as they happen. During Lent us the usual time for this immediate preparation.

number two, pouring, sprinkling and immersion have all been valid forms of Baptism throughout Church history (I think sprinkling is no longer done) and many or most Catholic Churches do use immersion for the Easter Vigil, because of its sign value, and many also have it as an option for baptizing infants. My grandson was baptized in a parish that has a very strong RCIA program and which has constructed a font that allows immersion of adults or infants. Parents were given a choice (DD chose pouring).

Watch out for blanket generalizations about what the Catholic Church does or does not do or allow. The liturgical rites, including and especially RCIA, allow for many variations suitable to time, place and culture.


#18

Can anyone tell me if my friend can be baptized. She is a divorcee and remarried. She has a baby son from her second marriage. She currently in RCIA, can she be baptized or must she annul her first wedding first? Can her baby from the 2nd marriage be baptized as well? Will it consider adultery?


#19

Not enouhh info provided to asses her current or previous marriage…is she married to a Catholic? was her first marriage to a Catholic?

In regards to her child…the baby can be baptized in the Church.

Best thing is for her to speak to her parish priest who can advise her as to what she needs to do:)


#20

Hi Karin,

Her first marriage is to a non-catholic, whereas the 2nd one is.

tks.


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