Will one be surprised of God's judgement on his soul at the moment of death?


#1

will you be surprised if God decides your soul will directly to heaven or hell?

I mean if one is pretty clear of if he has any unconfessed mortal sins at his death. though those who are sure of going directly heaven are mostly protestants, are they surprised when they have to go to purgatory first?


#2

I think if someone truly loves God they will eagerly embrace whatever remedy God has ordained in order that they may be completed in Christ. There is so much that we all don’t know. I am sure that each one of us will continuie to be amazed by the mercy of God, and the love that He has poured out for us in Christ Jesus.


#3

[quote=abcdefg]will you be surprised if God decides your soul will directly to heaven or hell?

I mean if one is pretty clear of if he has any unconfessed mortal sins at his death. though those who are sure of going directly heaven are mostly protestants, are they surprised when they have to go to purgatory first?
[/quote]

Either that or we will be pleasantly surprised IF there is no Purgatory !

More than likely (the folks who don’t believe in Purgatory) they will know, after their life review, that they do not really deserve to go straight to Heaven. Then they will be overjoyed when they find out they can make amends or be purified in Purgatory rather than go down below…

The folks that will really be surprised are those who either did not believe in Hell and end up there, or those who thought they were better than others and thought they were going to Heaven and end up condemned.

Folks who are so sure of their own salvation and so sure of other folks condemnation will be the most startled of all.

Let’s hope and pray there are no surprises for anyone here or anyone we know.

Christ’s Peace,
wc


#4

[quote=4 marks]I think if someone truly loves God they will eagerly embrace whatever remedy God has ordained in order that they may be completed in Christ. There is so much that we all don’t know. I am sure that each one of us will continuie to be amazed by the mercy of God, and the love that He has poured out for us in Christ Jesus.
[/quote]

What is scary is that when we die we our souls will truly love God, no matter how we lived on earth. Our souls will do what they were designed to do and that is want to worship our Lord. The problem is that if we are sent to hell, we will be hidden from the glory of God, and our souls will suffer from their intense desire to do what God intended them to do. Remember the only difference between hell and purgatory is that in purgatory you have the hope of someday being in the presence of God, and there not a chance of that in hell.


#5

Frankly, I’d be surprised to meet a god at all after death.


#6

[quote=AnAtheist]Frankly, I’d be surprised to meet a god at all after death.
[/quote]

I too would be suprised if you meet a god. Actually the surprise for you will be meeting God.


#7

[quote=gelsbern]What is scary is that when we die we our souls will truly love God, no matter how we lived on earth. Our souls will do what they were designed to do and that is want to worship our Lord. The problem is that if we are sent to hell, we will be hidden from the glory of God, and our souls will suffer from their intense desire to do what God intended them to do. Remember the only difference between hell and purgatory is that in purgatory you have the hope of someday being in the presence of God, and there not a chance of that in hell.
[/quote]

this can’t be right, can it? if god is all-merciful, and the souls in hell exist in a state of frustrated love of and desire for god, then why wouln’t they beg for mercy? if they did, they would get it.

i have always thought that the souls in hell were eternally hardened in their hatred for god, just like the devil and the other reprobate angels.

unless i misunderstood you.


#8

[quote=AnAtheist]Frankly, I’d be surprised to meet a god at all after death.
[/quote]

you’ll also be surprised to find out that einstein was wrong…

:wink:


#9

I don’t think that “surprise” will be an element of our state after death. The thing about death is, that it causes all sensory input to cease. There is no more input. There is nothing more that will cause us to “change our minds.” What we were at the instant of death, we will be for eternity. At the same time, being without bodies, we will be able to perceive the actual state of our souls. Being fully aware of our actual imperfections, inclinations, repented and unrepented sins, is itself a purgation. We become painfully aware. As we approach God, who is ultimate perfection, the closer we come to him, the more painfully we are aware of our flaws, which are burned off in the fire of his love. That is how I perceive purgatory. If we have already set our will against God, there is no reason to change our minds now, and we will hate him all the more, rushing to put distance between ourselves and him. That is hell.


#10

John Doran,

No you didn’t misunderstand me, I only shared one element of the torures of hell that scare me the most.

Also, remember once in hell, you are cut off completely from communion with God, if you begged for mercy, He would hear you but he would reply

Matthew 25:12 But he replied, ‘I tell you the truth, I don’t know you.’

Here are some excerpts from some good reading on the subject of hell.

rosary-center.org/ll57n3.htm

Here is a an excerpt from here as well. From rosary-center.org/ll44n6.htm

**The Pain of Loss: **

St. Augustine wrote centuries ago, “Our heart is made for Thee, O God, and it will be restless until it rests in Thee.” Only God can fill all the yearnings of the human heart. In this life man is often unaware of the cause of his restlessness, and at times will seek to fill the vacuum in his heart with passing satisfactions, even satisfactions forbidden by God. If one continues to seek forbidden satisfactions, it can lead to an exclusive love of self that involves an habitual disregard of God. If such an individual ends his life clinging to that choice, that is, unrepentant, his will is fixed eternally in that choice - an eternal separation from God.

The pain of loss depends on the realization of the value of the thing lost. And in the life beyond the grave, the lost souls - no longer hampered by union with the body - see with a clearness unknown in this life the true value of things. They will have an immeasurably greater realization of what God is than they were capable of while on earth. Locked in forever in the choice they have made, they are impelled by their very being to reach out for God, but they are imprisoned by their own selfishness. Their frustrating lot brings untold anguish and remorse, but not repentance, for they are no longer capable of any change of mind or heart. In the very depth of their being they are torn apart by the struggle within.

The human soul was created for the perfect enjoyment of the Beatific Vision of the Divine Trinity. Just as the enjoyment of the “face to face” vision of God constitutes a beatitude beyond anything we can imagine in this life, so the eternal loss of it constitutes a “pain of loss” beyond anything we can conceive in this life. For all eternity the damned have to live with the horrible choice of self in preference to God, the choice of earthly satisfactions (which now only disgust and torment) in preference to the possession of Him who is infinite GOOD, infinite LOVE, infinite TRUTH, infinite BEAUTY.

As the eye is made for light, so the mind is made for truth, and the will is made to love. Thus souls in hell, confirmed in hatred of God and deprived of the vision of God, will never attain the end to which they must tend by force of their very nature. Their existence is one of neverending frustration, an eternal unsatisfied craving of their whole being. The utter void of these souls, made for the enjoyment of infinite truth and infinite goodness, causes untold anguish.

Their consciousness of having by their own deliberate folly forfeited the greatest blessings for transitory and delusive pleasures humiliates and pains them beyond measure. Their desire for happiness inherent in their very nature, wholly unsatisfied and no longer able to find any compensation in creature-satisfactions for their loss of God, renders them totally and perpetually in a state of incompleteness and frustration.

They were called to be “children of light” (Eph. 5:9), but have been cast into “exterior darkness” (Mt. 8:12). They clearly see what their true end should have been, and their unclouded intellect makes the thought of God a maddening mystery to them, a torment that does not go away.

During the course of their earthly life-span no failure was final, because there was always another chance, at least in regards to repentance for one’s mistakes. But for those in hell, their life’s failure is final without any hope of another chance, or of regaining what was lost. They hate and curse God as the inflictor of punishment, they hate the Blessed for having what they lack, they hate themselves for choosing a way of life that led to this end. They would gladly accept annihilation as an escape from their torments, but they know there is no escape. Their lot is utter despair.

Nothing supernatural remains in hell, except the marks of baptism, confirmation and the priesthood deeply imprinted in the soul. These bring the constant and bitter memory of graces once received, to the increase of their remorse and the sense of greatness of what was lost. And while all the souls of the damned suffer the “pain of loss”, that punishment will not be equal for all, for all did not equally reject God during their time of trial.


#11

[quote=gelsbern]Also, remember once in hell, you are cut off completely from communion with God, if you begged for mercy, He would hear you but he would reply

Matthew 25:12 But he replied, ‘I tell you the truth, I don’t know you.’
[/quote]

that’s the part i have trouble with.


#12

[quote=gelsbern]What is scary is that when we die we our souls will truly love God, no matter how we lived on earth. Our souls will do what they were designed to do and that is want to worship our Lord. The problem is that if we are sent to hell, we will be hidden from the glory of God, and our souls will suffer from their intense desire to do what God intended them to do. Remember the only difference between hell and purgatory is that in purgatory you have the hope of someday being in the presence of God, and there not a chance of that in hell.
[/quote]

Well put gelsbern! :wink:


#13

[quote=john doran]this can’t be right, can it? if god is all-merciful, and the souls in hell exist in a state of frustrated love of and desire for god, then why wouln’t they beg for mercy? if they did, they would get it.

i have always thought that the souls in hell were eternally hardened in their hatred for god, just like the devil and the other reprobate angels.

unless i misunderstood you.
[/quote]

No one really knows all the particulars. Gelsbern has a very astute point. We were created to love God. We have freedom of will to cooperate with God and become what we were created to be, or to frustrate what God intends for us (which, whether we realize it or not, is for our very best…our highest good).

It should disturb us deeply that an eternal separation from intimate fellowship with God and with others, from becoming what we were designed to be, is possible. Our hearts are fickle. We do not always choose to cooperate with God by embracing and walking in God’s gift of sanctifying grace.

You have doubtless heard the saying, “There is a thin line between love and hate.” Maybe that is something akin to the state of those who have ultimately elected to reject God (hell). I pray that no one of us ends up this way, but it remains a real possibility.


#14

[quote=john doran]you’ll also be surprised to find out that einstein was wrong…

:wink:
[/quote]

:smiley: That’s a good one…


#15

[quote=AnAtheist]Frankly, I’d be surprised to meet a god at all after death.
[/quote]

And how will you respond WHEN or IF you do ?

OR you may not meet Him at all even though He exists, He may not want to see you.

Since you don’t believe Him, he may grant your desire for no God for you.

wc


#16

If you repented of your sins from hell, and begged for mercy, God would hear and forgive you. But you will only be in hell if you freely choose to reject God and choose to be there. You won’t change your mind, any more than Lucifer will change his mind. Your mind is only changeable in this life, not the next.


#17

pleasantly suprised–if He sends me straight to Heaven!!!:bounce: :bounce:

i wish.

:smiley:


#18

[quote=wcknight]And how will you respond WHEN or IF you do ?

[/quote]

Good question, and impossible to answer before I die. If there is God or some god or lots of gods, my response would depend on the nature of that god, provided that nature will become clear after death. And provided there is an afterlife at all. There might be a god, but no afterlife. Ever thought of that?

OR you may not meet Him at all even though He exists, He may not want to see you.

yes

Since you don’t believe Him, he may grant your desire for no God for you.

Well, that’s better than some god I can imagine (or other people have imagined).


#19

[quote=AnAtheist]Good question, and impossible to answer before I die. If there is God or some god or lots of gods, my response would depend on the nature of that god, provided that nature will become clear after death. And provided there is an afterlife at all. There might be a god, but no afterlife. Ever thought of that?

[/quote]

If there is a God and no afterlife, I wouldn’t know and it wouldn’t matter.

Should God not appear to your liking would you rather choose Hell than live forever with a God who does quite live up to your expectations ???

That seems like a ‘cut off your nose to spite your face approach’. Should we not be conforming to what God wants of us, as opposed to making God conform to what we want God to be ?

Well, that’s better than some god I can imagine (or other people have imagined).

I kind of like the God that most people imagine (at least the one that Christ is and refers to) meaning a God of Mercy and justice, a God who is better to you than any good Father is to their son, a God who takes on a human nature and is willing to suffer and die, so we can be with Him.

The problem with what some people imagine about God, is that they want Him to uphold all their own prejudices, preconceptions or misconceptions.

God doesn’t conform to anyones view. He is as He is.

Those who may be disappointed that God does not live up to what they expect Him to be, will probably be disappointed when they end up with what they deserve. IF they hate God now, they should not be disappointed when they end up hating God for all eternity.

Those who love God now, will love Him even more when they meet Him in person.

wc


#20

[quote=wcknight]Should God not appear to your liking would you rather choose Hell than live forever with a God who does quite live up to your expectations ???

[/quote]

How about you? Would you rather go to Hel than to Walhalla, if God turns out to be Odin?
I dare guess, the face you make, when you read that question is nearly the same as mine reading yours.

The problem with what some people imagine about God, is that they want Him to uphold all their own prejudices, preconceptions or misconceptions.

God doesn’t conform to anyones view. He is as He is.

No argument from me. That is exactly what I think of any god, humans have ever thought of. And the conclusion I have drawn is, that none of those gods exist.


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