Will the Eucharist help me?


#1

I know I asked something kinda like this but I’m so desperate to know. When I start recieving Jesus in the Eucharist, will I literally be strengthened both spiritually and bodiily? Spiritually, a huge increase of faith, bodily, the strength to actually do something. Would my anxiety decrease? :smiley:


#2

****Yes!

It also helps with sufferings, The best thing for our soul and mind is the body and blood of Christ. When you partake of the Eucharist think of Christ passion, really be aware of his presence for Christ prefers this , rather than us partaking out of habit.

Sara****


#3

It’s not a “happy pill” (so don’t expect that), but it is all the spiritual food you could ever need. Pray for Jesus to consume you, just as you consume Him. God answers prayers.

God Bless,
RyanL


#4

[quote=RyanL]It’s not a “happy pill” (so don’t expect that), but it is all the spiritual food you could ever need. Pray for Jesus to consume you, just as you consume Him. God answers prayers.

God Bless,
RyanL
[/quote]

I know it’s not a “happy pill”. I just want to know if it will make a bigger difference recieving Him than without Him. Like I’ll be able to do things better and more than I used to for the sake of Him. Make sense?


#5

It’s God among us! How could it not?

I didn’t mean to imply that the “happy pill” was what you were thinking - I simply wanted to caution against the expectation.

God Bless,
RyanL


#6

** Ryan said: I simply wanted to caution against the expectation.

It depends on how you recieve it, and the expectation is beyond belief.

Sara**


#7

[quote=sara888]** Ryan said: I simply wanted to caution against the expectation.

It depends on how you recieve it, and the expectation is beyond belief.

Sara**
[/quote]

Huh? So you mean if one takes the Eucharist expecting it to change their attitude to a better one, it will happen? Is that what you’re getting at?


#8

[quote=Paris Blues]Huh? So you mean if one takes the Eucharist expecting it to change their attitude to a better one, it will happen? Is that what you’re getting at?
[/quote]

Not by expecting. By praying.


#9

**It changes the soul, it makes one humble and loving wanting to serve God.

It depends on how you recieve it meaning, if you really feel and believe the presence of Christ, it does do miracles for the soul and mind.

The Eucharist changed my life, once I started observing its true essence and meaning.

Sara**


#10

Just like the Bible says, you need to discern Jesus in the Eucharist.

I have made it a point to go to a weekday Mass, if I am going to meet someone of another denomination and discuss the faith with them. I pray for a humble heart and to be a good witness. He might give me something else since that is what I need, and I am learning to accept what God gives me and not what I always ask for.

Sometimes God really lets you know he is there, even if you aren’t paying the best attention, he nudges you into paying attention. Sometimes when you are seeking Him, He makes you work a little, it takes a little more faith sometimes.

To answer your question, yes it will help you. God will give you what you need.

God Bless
Scylla


#11

Now what about attending daily Mass? I mean, do you need the Eucharist every single day in order to do okay that same day or it is like a “time” so to speak? In other words, would the Eucharist give one enough strength, courage, faith (that is through praying), etc. for the ONLY ONE day you recieve Him or does it last for a week or what?

See what I’m getting at?


#12

[quote=Paris Blues]Now what about attending daily Mass? I mean, do you need the Eucharist every single day in order to do okay that same day or it is like a “time” so to speak? In other words, would the Eucharist give one enough strength, courage, faith (that is through praying), etc. for the ONLY ONE day you recieve Him or does it last for a week or what?

See what I’m getting at?
[/quote]

Hi Paris!
I would like to point out something that I discovered in RCIA with my wife last year.

We were discussing the Eucharist with a wonderful British priest and he brought up the Our Father where it says “Give us this day our daily bread.” and commented that the Greek word used in that phrase is almost untranslatable because it means something that we cannot life without and that is necessary to our very being. I asked if maybe that was why the Douay-Rheims NT says this in Matthew 6:

9 Thus therefore shall you pray: Our Father who art in heaven, hallowed be thy name. 10 Thy kingdom come. Thy will be done on earth as it is in heaven. 11 Give us this day our supersubstantial

bread. 12 And forgive us our debts, as we also forgive our debtors. 13 And lead us not into temptation. But deliver us from evil. Amen.
(Emphasis mine) He smiled and said yes, since we were talking about St. Jerome’s Latin Vulgate anyway and the DRV is based upon it.

At Mass I always remember that I am there to partake of that supersubstantial bread.
Pax tecum,


#13

[quote=Church Militant]Hi Paris!
I would like to point out something that I discovered in RCIA with my wife last year.

We were discussing the Eucharist with a wonderful British priest and he brought up the Our Father where it says “Give us this day our daily bread.” and commented that the Greek word used in that phrase is almost untranslatable because it means something that we cannot life without and that is necessary to our very being. I asked if maybe that was why the Douay-Rheims NT says this in Matthew 6:(Emphasis mine) He smiled and said yes, since we were talking about St. Jerome’s Latin Vulgate anyway and the DRV is based upon it.

At Mass I always remember that I am there to partake of that supersubstantial bread.
Pax tecum,
[/quote]

Give us this day our DAILY BREAD! Wonderful!

Forgive my ignorance but is that the Eucharist? Or something else?


#14

[quote=Paris Blues]Give us this day our DAILY BREAD! Wonderful!

Forgive my ignorance but is that the Eucharist? Or something else?
[/quote]

**IV. “GIVE US THIS DAY OUR DAILY BREAD” **

**2828 **“Give us”: The trust of children who look to their Father for everything is beautiful. "He makes his sun rise on the evil and on the good, and sends rain on the just and on the unjust."113 He gives to all the living "their food in due season."114 Jesus teaches us this petition, because it glorifies our Father by acknowledging how good he is, beyond all goodness.

**2829 **“Give us” also expresses the covenant. We are his and he is ours, for our sake. But this “us” also recognizes him as the Father of all men and we pray to him for them all, in solidarity with their needs and sufferings.

**2830 **“Our bread”: The Father who gives us life cannot not but give us the nourishment life requires - all appropriate goods and blessings, both material and spiritual. In the Sermon on the Mount, Jesus insists on the filial trust that cooperates with our Father’s providence.115 He is not inviting us to idleness,116 but wants to relieve us from nagging worry and preoccupation. Such is the filial surrender of the children of God:

To those who seek the kingdom of God and his righteousness, he has promised to give all else besides. Since everything indeed belongs to God, he who possesses God wants for nothing, if he himself is not found wanting before God.117

**2831 **But the presence of those who hunger because they lack bread opens up another profound meaning of this petition. The drama of hunger in the world calls Christians who pray sincerely to exercise responsibility toward their brethren, both in their personal behavior and in their solidarity with the human family. This petition of the Lord’s Prayer cannot be isolated from the parables of the poor man Lazarus and of the Last Judgment.118

**2832 **As leaven in the dough, the newness of the kingdom should make the earth “rise” by the Spirit of Christ.119 This must be shown by the establishment of justice in personal and social, economic and international relations, without ever forgetting that there are no just structures without people who want to be just.

**2833 **“Our” bread is the “one” loaf for the “many.” In the Beatitudes “poverty” is the virtue of sharing: it calls us to communicate and share both material and spiritual goods, not by coercion but out of love, so that the abundance of some may remedy the needs of others.120

**2834 **"Pray and work."121 "Pray as if everything depended on God and work as if everything depended on you."122 Even when we have done our work, the food we receive is still a gift from our Father; it is good to ask Him for it and to thank Him, as Christian families do when saying grace at meals. **2835 **This petition, with the responsibility it involves, also applies to another hunger from which men are perishing: "Man does not live by bread alone, but . . . by every word that proceeds from the mouth of God,"123 that is, by the Word he speaks and the Spirit he breathes forth. Christians must make every effort “to proclaim the good news to the poor.” There is a famine on earth, "not a famine of bread, nor a thirst for water, but of hearing the words of the LORD."124 For this reason the specifically Christian sense of this fourth petition concerns the Bread of Life: The Word of God accepted in faith, the Body of Christ received in the Eucharist.125

vatican.va/archive/catechism/p4s2a3.htm


#15

Continued…

**2836 **“This day” is also an expression of trust taught us by the Lord,126 which we would never have presumed to invent. Since it refers above all to his Word and to the Body of his Son, this “today” is not only that of our mortal time, but also the “today” of God.

If you receive the bread each day, each day is today for you. If Christ is yours today, he rises for you every day. How can this be? “You are my Son, today I have begotten you.” Therefore, “today” is when Christ rises.127

**2837 **“Daily” (epiousios) occurs nowhere else in the New Testament. Taken in a temporal sense, this word is a pedagogical repetition of "this day,"128 to confirm us in trust “without reservation.” Taken in the qualitative sense, it signifies what is necessary for life, and more broadly every good thing sufficient for subsistence.129 Taken literally (epi-ousios: “super-essential”), it refers directly to the Bread of Life, the Body of Christ, the “medicine of immortality,” without which we have no life within us.130 Finally in this connection, its heavenly meaning is evident: “this day” is the Day of the Lord, the day of the feast of the kingdom, anticipated in the Eucharist that is already the foretaste of the kingdom to come. For this reason it is fitting for the Eucharistic liturgy to be celebrated each day.

The Eucharist is our daily bread. The power belonging to this divine food makes it a bond of union. Its effect is then understood as unity, so that, gathered into his Body and made members of him, we may become what we receive. . . . This also is our daily bread: the readings you hear each day in church and the hymns you hear and sing. All these are necessities for our pilgrimage.131 The Father in heaven urges us, as children of heaven, to ask for the bread of heaven. [Christ] himself is the bread who, sown in the Virgin, raised up in the flesh, kneaded in the Passion, baked in the oven of the tomb, reserved in churches, brought to altars, furnishes the faithful each day with food from heaven.132

vatican.va/archive/catechism/p4s2a3.htm


#16

Yesterday’s Angleus address, the last from Castel Gandalfo:

[indent]The whole of Jesus’ earthly existence, from his conception until his death on the cross, was an act of love, to the point that we can summarize our faith in these words: “Jesus, caritas” – Jesus, love. In the Last Supper, knowing that his hour had come, the divine Master gave his disciples the supreme example of love, washing their feet, and entrusted to them his precious legacy, the Eucharist, in which the whole paschal mystery is centered, as the venerated Pope John Paul II wrote in the encyclical “Ecclesia de Eucharistia.” Take and eat, all of you, because this is my Body," “Take and drink all of you, because this is the cup of my Blood.”

Jesus’ words in the cenacle anticipated his death and manifested the consciousness with which he faced it, transforming it into a gift of himself, in the act of love that gives itself totally. In the Eucharist, the Lord gives himself to us with his body, with his soul and with his divinity, and we become one with him and among ourselves.

Our response to his love therefore must be concrete, and must be expressed in a genuine conversion to love, in forgiveness, in reciprocal acceptance and in attention for the needs of all. Many and varied are the forms of service that we can offer our neighbor in everyday life, if we pay a little attention. The Eucharist becomes in this way the source of the spiritual energy that renews our life every day and, in this way, renews the love of Christ to the world.

Exemplary witnesses of this love are the saints, who drew from the Eucharist the strength of an operative and often heroic charity. Now I am thinking in particular of St. Vincent de Paul, whose liturgical memorial we will celebrate day after tomorrow, who said: “What joy to serve the person of Jesus in his poor members!” and he did so with his life. I am also thinking of Blessed Mother Teresa, founder of the Missionaries of Charity, who, in the poorest of the poor, loved Jesus, received and contemplated every day in the consecrated Host.

[/indent]


#17

[quote=Paris Blues]Now what about attending daily Mass? I mean, do you need the Eucharist every single day in order to do okay that same day or it is like a “time” so to speak? In other words, would the Eucharist give one enough strength, courage, faith (that is through praying), etc. for the ONLY ONE day you recieve Him or does it last for a week or what?

See what I’m getting at?
[/quote]

Honestly, it’s almost like an addiction, but without the negative connotations of that word. I’ve always gone to Sunday Mass, but within the last year have started attending daily Mass when I can. It’s amazing; the chance to really be present with Jesus is something you just can’t pass up.

I’m “OK” if I don’t go to daily Mass, but my faith has increased so much by doing so, that I can’t imagine not doing it.


#18

[quote=Paris Blues]I know I asked something kinda like this but I’m so desperate to know. When I start recieving Jesus in the Eucharist, will I literally be strengthened both spiritually and bodiily? Spiritually, a huge increase of faith, bodily, the strength to actually do something. Would my anxiety decrease? :smiley:
[/quote]

All I know that when I was NOT going to Mass and partaking of the Holy Eucharist, I was much more sinful. When I go to daily Mass and partake of the Eucharist Daily, my communion with God is strengthened. I know, by the real change in my life, that I am strengthened and better equipped to deal with temptation because of the Holy Eucharist.


#19

[quote=itsjustdave1988]All I know that when I was NOT going to Mass and partaking of the Holy Eucharist, I was much more sinful. When I go to daily Mass and partake of the Eucharist Daily, my communion with God is strengthened. I know, by the real change in my life, that I am strengthened and better equipped to deal with temptation because of the Holy Eucharist.
[/quote]

Exactly!!


#20

[quote=Paris Blues]Now what about attending daily Mass? I mean, do you need the Eucharist every single day in order to do okay that same day or it is like a “time” so to speak? In other words, would the Eucharist give one enough strength, courage, faith (that is through praying), etc. for the ONLY ONE day you recieve Him or does it last for a week or what?

See what I’m getting at?
[/quote]

The Eucharist doesn’t ever stop working in your life, what happens is you stop allowing it to work by forgetting about God and getting caught up in the world. Daily Mass is wonderful because it’s a time to open your heart back up to God, to start afresh doing his will. It is a matter of what is in your heart, God will give you the graces to do what he wants, but you have to cooperate with him.

On that note, it is not recommended that you take the Eucharist multiple times during the day; you can’t “double up” on Christ. :wink:


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