Woman taken in adultery


#1

“Let the one among you who is without sin be the first to cast a stone at her.”
They walked away.
He asked her, “Where are they, your accusers?”
She just looked at Him.
“Have you no one left to condemn you?”
“No one.”
“Neither do I condemn you. Go, and do not sin again.”

And she walked away along the dusty street, saved and forgiven. Though it dawned on me. She was never mentioned again, but what do you think ever happened to her? She might have gone home and had to face her husband. I feel men still would have condemned her, and she would have been gossiped about and made to feel shamed. Though she would have known Jesus had forgiven her, and that, if I were her, would have given me peace in my heart, even if my own husband and others wouldn’t.


#2

I like to think she became one of His disciples, and helped spread the Good News to people who didn’t have the benefit of encountering Jesus.


#3

Having been caught in adultery does not necessarily mean that she was married. She might very well have been a single woman caught with a married man.

My thought has always been, “Where was the man she was with?” Perhaps he ran off before they could catch him. Perhaps they knew this woman was a prostitute (if she was) and were more concerned about stopping her than her "clients. :shrug:

Anyway, I’ve always imagined she probably took the clothing of a widow and lived the rest of her life as one of Jesus’ disciples, and then as a helper to the Apostles.

May she pray for all of us! :heart:


#4

#5

Some say she was Mary magdalene


#6

While this story was added at a later time, scholars have no idea whether it is fictional or not. Many scholars do believe that it does originate with John, that it is non-fictional, and that it was part of the Oral Tradition that was handed down from John.


#7

Duane1966
Re: Woman taken in adultery
While this story was added at a later time, scholars have no idea whether it is fictional or not. Many scholars do believe that it does originate with John, that it is non-fictional, and that it was part of the Oral Tradition that was handed down from John.

Interesting thought. It first appears in the Gospel of Luke, in 2 different places, then it moves to John (again, in 2 different places). It is clearly not part of the original autographs, which were inerrant, God-breathed Scripture. Did this really happen? We don’t know. It certainly sounds like something Jesus would do, and is a good object lesson to us today. The questions raised (what happened to her, where was the man that was with her) are irrelevant to the lesson - examine yourself before bringing an accusation against someone else. To go beyond that, I believe, is to miss the point entirely, IMHO!


#8

How can we know? They no longer exist or we, at least, do not know of their existence.


#9

The fact is, we simply don’t know and probably never will. There is not a wealth of extant manuscripts from before the 4th century. Does it matter? Not really because as someone else said, it fits in perfectly with the meaning of the gospels.


#10

Tim_D
Re: Woman taken in adultery
How can we know? They no longer exist or we, at least, do not know of their existence.

This is not in the oldest manuscripts available, and when it does appear, it’s in a different Gospel (and even then, it jumps around within the Gospels of Luke and John before ending where we have it today). Given the way the Scriptures were copied and passed along, it’s highly unlikely that someone removed it at a very early date, only to have it reappear decades or even centuries later. Also the fact that it has been found in at least 3 other places within 2 different Gospels raises questions about who might have written it originally (if it was in the original autograph). I have no doubt that it was a story passed on (whether true or not), and was added by a copyist who believed he was “correcting the record”, so to speak, but I do not see how it could possibly have been in an original autograph.


#11

I actually never thought of that. I had always thought both she and the man she was with were each married, to make it adultery, but not necessarily. I’m disappointed to read that it’s possible this story isn’t even true, because it has always been one of my favorite ones. I know it shouldn’t matter, but it showed the tenderest side of Jesus, a Man helping a weakened woman, freeing her, and I imagine if I were her.


#12

The whole thing was a setup. Both of the accused were to be stoned and they were supposed to be tried fairly. The Pharisees were attempting to either get Him arrested for murder or discredit Him as one who repudiated the Law of Moses.


#13

The Pharisees were terrible. Condemning others’ flaws, while painting themselves in a righteous glow. A little reminiscent of what we see now. Things never change. I see parallels all throughout the ages.


#14

You can actually take it even one step further than that. I think adultery can mean any kind of act between two people that lies outside what is acceptable in sexual morality. Two unmarried people can commit adultery, then.


#15

Where was that man?
What about the woman in the well?
It is stated she had five husbands. Did each husband die or was it divorce?


#16

Two unmarried people engaged in sexual relations would be said to be guilty of fornication, not adultery.


#17

Didn’t the Catholic Church declare the Vulgate to be infallible? The Vulgate contains this story, so therefore it would be part of Scripture if this reasoning is correct.


closed #18

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