Women: are there non-contraceptive forms of menstrual cycle regulation?

I am a male and have been trying to discussing with a girl about the Catholic stance on birth control.

She says that she suffers from severe back and abdominal cramps, highly irregular periods and mood swings: all of which have settled because of her use of contraceptives.

Are there non-contraceptive forms of dealing with the above symptoms?

I have searched online to no avail.

Yes. A good OBGYN should be able to offer other options to treat these syptoms that doesn’t involve consuming a known carcinogin with dangerous side effects.

She should find a NaPro doctor. They’re awesome.

Definitely take a look at the NaPro link- there are ways to deal with these symptoms that don’t involve taking hormones, and I’d encourage anyone to try whatever they could before resorting to them.

However- keep in mind that there is nothing wrong her treatment of these symptoms. Some women have so much pain they can barely function or hold a job, and artificial hormones can enable them to lead a more comfortable life. Be careful not to give your friend misinformation about what the church requires of us.

Right. Just to confirm, contraception is ok as long as one is not sexually active?

Also her symptoms are pretty severe, I suppose I am asking are there artificial hormones that can help those symptoms without being contraceptive?

Contraception is never okay. If she is not sexually active, she is not contracepting and it is not considered birth control, no matter what the pill she’s taking is marketed as.

Love all these vague answers of yes there are “ways” to treat it other than BCPs, yet not one of those responses mentions any of them specifically.

Ok got. Definition difference, but i understand.

Can you or others shed light on hormonal support for her symptoms that does not prevent pregnancy?

Sorry for the bugging questions, but I am a guy and I have limited knowledge on this trying to convince a girl who isn’t Catholic.

Specifically, anything from NASIDs, diet changes and other drug therapies can be applied after a thorough medical checkup, including blood work and checking for any other underlying health issues such as a thyroid problem. There is also a medical procedure that can be performed on the lining of the uterus.

Does that help?

Thank you.

That is because we can’t give medical advice.

So, if I say “Yes, there are other options.” Then tell the woman to see an NFP or NaPro doctor, I am not giving medical advice.

But if I say, “I had really bad periods, heavy bleeding and pain that put me in bed, but my doctor gave me **************. You should ask about it.” Then that is giving medical advice.

Return to the advice on a NaPro OB/GYN who can do a consult. This could be a hormone imbalance or endometriosis. All the women in our family had endometriosis and the first thing they do is put you on ABC. Don’t bother to tell you the side effects. Endometriosis may need a surgical treatment but there are other anti inflammatory drugs that help with the pain. But they don’t cure the problem. Unless she wants to deal with this until menopause try to get a cure rather than just pain regulation. It IS incredibly painful so I understand her desire to just go with the ABC as the quick fix but the long run it only gets worse and if she every wants children in the future, this could cause serious problems.

Lisa

If she’s taking medicine that can be used as a contraceptive to treat other serious symptoms, it’s fine. Even if she were married and having sex with her husband it would be fine. Here, flip to part 15 of Humanae Vitae:

[quote=Part 15]Lawful Therapeutic Means

  1. On the other hand, the Church does not consider at all illicit the use of those therapeutic means necessary to cure bodily diseases, even if a foreseeable impediment to procreation should result there from—provided such impediment is not directly intended for any motive whatsoever. (19)
    [/quote]

Thank you all for your responses. You’ve been very helpful. May God bless you and keep you and may His face shine upon you.

=BlaineTog;10810010]If she’s taking medicine that can be used as a contraceptive to treat other serious symptoms, it’s fine. Even if she were married and having sex with her husband it would be fine. Here, flip to part 15 of Humanae Vitae

[quote]15. On the other hand, the Church does not consider at all illicit the use of those therapeutic means necessary to cure bodily diseases

, even if a foreseeable impediment to procreation should result there from—provided such impediment is not directly intended for any motive whatsoever. (19)
[/quote]

“Therapeutic means” might mean a hysterectomy. Do not readily conclude that this quote justifies the use of birth control pills while sexually active.
Remember that birth control pills contain abortifacients.

As others have said, we aren’t supposed to give medical advice. I think it is nice that you are concerned for your friend, and depending on how close you are it might be okay to mention that she could seek other treatment options- but when you say “try to convince” it makes me wonder whether you are being a little pushy about it. It doesn’t sound like she is actually doing anything wrong, so if your concern is that she could look into other more healthy options, that’s one thing. But also keep in mind that it is her condition and the way she treats it is her business, and she should not have to defend that to you.

The reason the responses are vague is because the treatement for an individual woman would depend on what specifically is causing the syptoms in the first place. There are more than one cause for PMS and cramps. An example would be, having low progesterone. Many birth control bills include estrogen, so obviously that would not help a woman in that situation and could heighten her chances for breast cancer and fertility issues. There are different kinds of treatments such as suppliments or drugs that help the woman produce more progesterone that would be a better alternative, but lots of women who have this common problem never seek those treatments because they say, “Hey doc, I have irregular periods!” and the doctor prescribes the pill without so much as an examination or a blood test.
Another example is endomitriosis. That’s an ailment that can cause these problems as well and NaPro technology has newer treatments that treat the condition itself, rather than the pill which masks the symptoms. (except for what most women consider the worst symptom which is difficulty carrying a pregnancy to term.)

:sad_yes: Slap a band aid on the problem, in this case birth control pills, and call it a day. Women then may never know there was an underlying problem that could have been fixed by a dietary change or a more serious situation needed to be addressed.

This paragraph is right on the money. Contraception is wrong and sinful when used as birth control. However, when used only for the purposes of medical treatment, especially if she is not sexually active, they are permitted. There are certain medical conditions, for example severe endometriosis, that can only be treated with contraceptives. If she is not sexually active and she is indeed taking to cure her conditions on a temporary basis, then it is not sinful.

Actually what you are talking about is not severe cases of endometriosis. those can be treated with newer treatments but Acute endometriosis can only be treated effectively with Depo Provera (which doesn’t mask the symptoms, it actually cures the condition) or surgery. I know it because I suffered from acute endometriosis and I can assure that nothing else works.

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