Words of Consecration

I am a recent ‘inductee,’ if you will, into the Traditional Rite and I must say I am completely in love with the TLM. I do, however, have a question about some of the words used during the consecration:

HIC EST ENIM CALIX SANGUINIS MEI, NOVI ET AETERNI TESTAMENTI: MYSTERIUM FIDEI, QUI PRO VOBIS ET PRO MULTIS EFFUNDETUR IN REMISSIONEM PECCATORUM.

(FOR THIS IS THE CHALICE OF MY BLOOD, OF THE NEW AND ETERNAL TESTAMENT, THE MYSTERY OF FAITH, WHICH FOR YOU AND FOR MANY SHALL BE SHED UNTO THE REMISSION OF SINS.)

Why are the words ‘the mystery of faith’ included in the consecration, as they aren’t in the scriptural account of the Last Supper?

Thanks!

Catechism Council of Trent

“Form To Be Used In The Consecration Of The Wine
With regard lo the consecration of the wine, which is the other element of this Sacrament, the priest, for the reason we have already assigned, ought of necessity to be well acquainted with, and well understand its form. We are then firmly to believe that it consists in the following words: This is the chalice of my blood, of the new and eternal testament, the mystery of faith, which shall be shed for you and for many, to the remission of sins. Of these words the greater part are taken from Scripture; but some have been preserved in the Church from Apostolic tradition.
Thus the words, this is the chalice, are found in St. Luke and in the Apostle; but the words that immediately follow, of my blood, or my blood of the new testament, which shall be shed for you and for many to the remission of sins, are found partly in St. Luke and partly in St. Matthew. But the words, eternal, and the mystery of faith, have been taught us by holy tradition, the interpreter and keeper of Catholic truth.Concerning this form no one can doubt, if he here also attend to what has been already said about the form used in the consecration of the bread. The form to be used (in the consecration) of this element, evidently consists of those words which signify that the substance of the wine is changed into the blood of our Lord. since, therefore, the words already cited clearly declare this, it is plain that no other words constitute the form.
They moreover express certain admirable fruits of the blood shed in the Passion of our Lord, fruits which pertain in a most special manner to this Sacrament. Of these, one is access to the eternal inheritance, which has come to us by right of the new and everlasting testament. Another is access to righteousness by the mystery of faith; for God hath set forth Jesus to be a propitiator through faith in his blood, that he himself may be just, and the justifier of him, who is of the faith of Jesus. Christ. A third effect is the remission of sins.”

catholicapologetics.info/thechurch/catechism/Holy7Sacraments-Eucharist.shtml

LATERAN COUNCIL III 1179

414-415 “You have asked (indeed) who has added to the form of the words which Christ Himself expressed when He changed the bread and wine into the body and blood, that in the Canon of the Mass which the general Church uses, which none of the Evangelists is read to have expressed. . . . In the Canon of the Mass that expression, "mysterium fidei,"is found interposed among His words. . From the expression, moreover, concerning which your brotherhood raised the question, namely “mysterium fidei,” certain people have thought to draw a protection against error… Yet “mysterium fidei” is mentioned, since something is believed there other than what is perceived; and something is perceived other than is believed… Therefore, we believe that the form of words, as is found in, the Canon, the Apostles received from Christ, and their successors from them. . . .

Here is a link to an Encyclical Letter from Pope Paul VI dated 9/3/65 which answers this question. It’s rather long, but seems to be what you’re looking for. The Mystery of Faith is talking of the Eucharist.

“For if the sacred liturgy holds the first place in the life of the Church, the Eucharistic Mystery stands at the heart and center of the liturgy, since it is the font of life by which we are cleansed and strengthened to lie not for ourselves but for God, and to be united in love among ourselves”

ourladyswarriors.org/teach/mystfide.htm

Mary

That was quick! Thanks!

Father Annibale Bugnini and a small group of priests and theologians wrote the liturgy for the New Mass. In his book *Reform of the Liturgy *Father Bugnini errs when he states the following:
Pg 454 “ The addition “mystery of faith” in the formula for the consecration of the wine in the Roman Canon: is not biblical; occurs only in the Roma Canon; is of uncertain orgin.”

Surely he must have known that the words were passed on by Tradition. Pope Paul VI insisted that the words :Mystery of Faith" remain in the Mass. He put them after the Consecration where the words now have a different meaning. “The Mystery of Faith: Christ has died, Christ has rised, Christ will come again”

And I may add- is a denial of the Presence of Christ on the Altar at that moment. If Christ is there, the “Acclamation” should not be in the “third person”. It should say, "You, Christ have died,…risen, etc. ". This phrase, the most common one used, is the most dangerous and can be seen as a denial of the Real Presence of Christ on the Altar at that moment. The “Mystery of Faith” is what has just happened, the transformation of bread and wine into God the Son Himself.

Ken

If you will read the Words of Institution in the classical rites, and especially of the Eastern Churches (whether in union with Rome or not) there are differences of phraseology, but the meaning is the same in them all. Almost none of them contain the prase, “The mystery of Faith”, except the Roman Rite; not even the Toledan rite had it.

The form they take is not, and never has been, directly quoted from the Bible, but are rather liturgical and traditional.

Remember, the Church was celebrating the Eucharist before ONE WORD of the New Testament was written down.

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