Words spoken for a valid baptism

CCC 1240 says that for a baptism, the person doing the baptism has to say “[Name], I baptize you in the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit.” What if the wording isn’t exactly the same? For example, if you don’t say the person’s name, or you drop a minor word or two, like “I baptize you in the name of the Father, and the Son, and the Holy Spirit”? Or if the person performing the baptism stutters, etc.?

I assume that the phrase doesn’t have to be precisely correct, as long as it expresses what’s happening (a Trinitarian baptism). Am I correct?

[quote="yellowantphil, post:1, topic:183948"]
CCC 1240 says that for a baptism, the person doing the baptism has to say "[Name], I baptize you in the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit." What if the wording isn't exactly the same? For example, if you don't say the person's name, or you drop a minor word or two, like "I baptize you in the name of the Father, and the Son, and the Holy Spirit"? Or if the person performing the baptism stutters, etc.?

I assume that the phrase doesn't have to be precisely correct, as long as it expresses what's happening (a Trinitarian baptism). Am I correct?

[/quote]

Personally, I don't know about "minor" words. But I do know that a valid baptism MUST include "Father, Son, and Holy Spirit." It cannot be simply a trinitarian formula, such as "the creator, redeemer, and sanctifier." That sort of inclusive language baptism formula was used by some priests and deacons some time back and, as I understand it, resulted in a number of invalid (non-existant) baptisms.

If I'm wrong on that point, I hope someone will correct me.

Gertie

[quote="yellowantphil, post:1, topic:183948"]
CCC 1240 says that for a baptism, the person doing the baptism has to say "[Name], I baptize you in the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit." What if the wording isn't exactly the same? For example, if you don't say the person's name, or you drop a minor word or two, like "I baptize you in the name of the Father, and the Son, and the Holy Spirit"? Or if the person performing the baptism stutters, etc.?

I assume that the phrase doesn't have to be precisely correct, as long as it expresses what's happening (a Trinitarian baptism). Am I correct?

[/quote]

It has to contain "I Baptize you
in the name of
the Father,
the Son and
the Holy Spirit (Ghost)"

Adding of the Son or and the Son or removing those connector words would most likely not invalidate the Baptism.

In the Byzantine tradition, the fomula is "The servant of God NAME is baptized in the Name of the Father, the Son, and the Holy Spirit."

I have been told that other Eastern Churches have the forumual in the second person, "You are baptized in the Name..." or "Be baptized in the Name...."

These formulae are just as valid.

[quote="yellowantphil, post:1, topic:183948"]
CCC 1240 says that for a baptism, the person doing the baptism has to say "[Name], I baptize you in the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit." What if the wording isn't exactly the same? For example, if you don't say the person's name, or you drop a minor word or two, like "I baptize you in the name of the Father, and the Son, and the Holy Spirit"? Or if the person performing the baptism stutters, etc.?

I assume that the phrase doesn't have to be precisely correct, as long as it expresses what's happening (a Trinitarian baptism). Am I correct?

[/quote]

The name does not belong to the essence of the formula and so can be omitted.
Stutterers can baptize validly as there is a "moral unity" between the words.
Alteration of the formula in a way that does not change its meaning still generally renders the formula valid. Thus, omitting a "and" would not, omitting "Son" would. Where it gets tricky is where it is hard ot discern the meaning. For example, if a person says "I bapize you in the name of the Father, I baptize you in the name of the Son, etc." it is difficult to say because the person could be expressing the heresy of modalism, instead of Trinitarian doctrine. In these cases, moral theologians have given their opinions, and ultimately it is Rome who make a decision, if one is necessary.

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