Working on Holy Days of Obligation: Scruple or Mortal Sin?


#1

Hello - if I can plan ahead and schedule time off of work on the few Holy Days of Obligation in the US and I don’t because I would prefer to work and not take those days off, even though I attend Mass on those days - am I at risk of Mortal Sin, Venial Sin? Or is being able to attend Mass enough to meet the Church’s requirement (see quote from Catechism below)?

2185 On Sundays and other holy days of obligation, the faithful are to refrain from engaging in work or activities that hinder the worship owed to God, the joy proper to the Lord’s Day, the performance of the works of mercy, and the appropriate relaxation of mind and body.123 Family needs or important social service can legitimately excuse from the obligation of Sunday rest. The faithful should see to it that legitimate excuses do not lead to habits prejudicial to religion, family life, and health.


#2

I think if you can take the day off you are supposed to. I think it would be a mortal sin to work for many hours on a Sunday or holy day of obligation unnecessarily.


#3

I think you should discuss this with your priest.


#4

If it were a mortal sin to work on a HDO then do you realize that you are condemning a huge amount of people today?


#5

The rule doesn’t apply to people who don’t know it’s wrong(like non Catholics) because mortal sin requires full knowledge. Also, if they can’t move a shift or something like that, if it’s necessary then it’s not a mortal sin.


#6

Every parish I’ve ever experienced has a HDO Mass schedule for 5 or 6 PM, end of the work day. I have never, not even in the 1950’s, heard it preached that one must not work on a HDO unless it were absolutely necessary. We are primarily an office-based and service-based economy, there are relatively few who can “re-schedule a shift.” Has anyone had it preached in church that people should not work on Nov. 1 or Dec. 8 or Aug 15th - HDO’s that don’t correspond to civic holidays?


#7

scborromeo.org/ccc/p3s2c1a3.htm

2185 On Sundays and other holy days of obligation, the faithful are to refrain from engaging in work or activities that hinder the worship owed to God, the joy proper to the Lord’s Day, the performance of the works of mercy, and the appropriate relaxation of mind and body.123 Family needs or important social service can legitimately excuse from the obligation of Sunday rest. The faithful should see to it that legitimate excuses do not lead to habits prejudicial to religion, family life, and health.

If you can’t reschedule a shift, then you’re not at fault.


#8

I can’t speak to the sinfulness of it, but you really ought to take it off if you can.


#9

Well that would mitigate the “mortal sin” part of it but not the Grave Matter part. My point is, and this is where the anti logic of scrupulous people comes in, By being scrupulous about such things we are really judging others. If one logically thinks of a Catholic loving merciful God that would condemn a Catholic or non Catholic for fufilling a job duty on January 1 then they either have a poor understanding of God and Catholic theology and should correct that problem before they worry about such things, or they should seek help for a scrupulosity that is similar to OCD and realize that they need help.

I have long held that some scrupulous people do so out of a holier than thou place. Not all, but some.

That being said, Mass was kinda empty today…:eek:


#10

If they can’t get out of their shift, they would lose their job, etc. then that is necessary work and I think that doesn’t count. It wouldn’t be a mortal sin.


#11

Mortal sin requires 3 things. Grave matter. Full consent of the will and knowledge.

My point is that NONE of those three exist for someone scheduled to work on an HDO. You obviously agree on some of them but I think you need to say what the “Grave Matter” would be. Please. Isn’t the obligation to attend Mass? While the Sunday rest from work can be tied to God’s laws and creation, how is an HDO supposed to be a day of rest?


#12

vatican.va/archive/ccc_css/archive/catechism/p3s2c1a3.htm

2185 On Sundays and other holy days of obligation, the faithful are to refrain from engaging in work or activities that hinder the worship owed to God, the joy proper to the Lord’s Day, the performance of the works of mercy, and the appropriate relaxation of mind and body.123 Family needs or important social service can legitimately excuse from the obligation of Sunday rest. The faithful should see to it that legitimate excuses do not lead to habits prejudicial to religion, family life, and health.
2187 Sanctifying Sundays and holy days requires a common effort. Every Christian should avoid making unnecessary demands on others that would hinder them from observing the Lord’s Day. Traditional activities (sport, restaurants, etc.), and social necessities (public services, etc.), require some people to work on Sundays, but everyone should still take care to set aside sufficient time for leisure. With temperance and charity the faithful will see to it that they avoid the excesses and violence sometimes associated with popular leisure activities. In spite of economic constraints, public authorities should ensure citizens a time intended for rest and divine worship. Employers have a similar obligation toward their employees.


#13

Yes I am researching this as well. Very interesting…
Here:
wdtprs.com/blog/2010/11/quaeritur-work-or-school-on-holy-days-of-obligation/

I still maintain that there is no grave matter here.

The Catholic schools in my area are in full swing on Dec 8th… Are they all commiting grave matter?


#14

My work gives me vacation days which are flexible (I can basically choose the days). Would I be at risk of pre-meditated mortal or venial sin if I didn’t take the time off on Holy Days of Obligation. Or is this just a scruple and nothing to be concerned with? If not a scruple, then maybe I’ll use some vacation time for this. Further thoughts?


#15

Go talk to your priest, I probably would take them off if I were you. Catholic schools used to take off Holy Days of Obligation, I do not know why they don’t anymore.


#16

I believe the reason Holy Days of Obligation are typically no longer given as vacation days is partly because keeping children in school provides a way to see that children actually go to Mass and partly due to pressure from working parents who don’t wish to have to arrange for childcare.


#17

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