Working while in college


#1

I'm currently working while in school and I was unprepared and caught off guard by the homework load this quarter and have falling behind because of it. Has anyone here ever had to drop there classes during a quarter/semester? I don't want to but I'm wondering if dropping them and going into next quarter prepared would be good.


#2

No, no, no, no, no!!!

DO NOT DROP CLASSES.

I am speaking as someone who has had to learn a lot of hard lessons when it came to the school/work paradigm in college. I have a lot of regrets when it comes to my education, and a lot of it has to do with allowing work to interfere with my studies.

It wasn't until my last 1.5 years in college that I promised myself that I would no longer allow work to get in the way of school. To me, completing a degree is more important than the measly $9/hr job that you have. The more you make accommodations for work, the more it will happen that school will be pushed to the back burner, and the next thing you know it's 5 years and you still haven't finished your degree.

If you have to, find another job that pays slightly more, but will allow you to work longer hours on fewer days, so you have more time to complete your homework. I honestly couldn't do the working every day or most days right after school, and my schedule allowed me to work just a couple days but still get in a lot of hours, and my paychecks were pretty consistent.

Trust me-- college is simply too important and if you don't have to have a lot of regrets, put school before work. When you're done, you can put work first but right now getting homework done is more important. I just wished that someone had stressed to me how important it was, and if they had my college years would have been a lot better.


#3

When I went to college we had to go to this orientation class and I learned something that helped me during my entire college career and is even helping me today. This is what he taught us: When you are in college, there are three aspects to your life - school, work and social. Pick two because you can only do two well. So you can go to school and have a social life. Or you can have a social life and work. Or you can work and go to school. But you can't do all three. You have to choose two.

And I know it can be done. I am married and I am finishing up a degree this quarter. ( I should be doing homework as I type this but I'm taking a break). I also work two jobs. But my friends think I have dropped off the face of the earth. But we are all older and they know I am finishing a degree so they are very understanding. And my husband is a wonderful man because we live in the same house but he hasn't seen me much this quarter because school is crazy. But I have to work because we ahve to have the income so my social life suffers. I am just thankful that I have very understanding friends and a wonderful husband who understands that I have to do this.


#4

I had to drop classes and delay graduation for personal reasons. It took me longer to graduate then others, but who cares? I graduated just fine,thank you, and with honors.

You need to do what you need to do. I'd rather drop a class here or there, graduate with honors, then do miserable in class and have it effect my GPA.


#5

In all things....balance. Drop a couple classes if needed. Is this a job you have to have to pay bills, or is this "walking around" money? IF you are picking between spare cash and god grades...pick grades.


#6

It's better to drop a class than fail it, though as another poster said your school work needs to be priority number one as much as possible. There are many students now who have no choice but to work through school so cutting back hours or switching jobs is not possible for them, however.

How far along are you in school? Keep in mind that the farther you go in your major, the more work you are going to have. If you have to work to support yourself in college, maybe going part time would be a better option. It is better to take a few classes and do well in them than to take a full load and do poorly or fail.

Whatever you do, just don't make the mistake of abandoning school to work full time!


#7

[quote="Lutheranteach, post:5, topic:226439"]
In all things....balance. Drop a couple classes if needed. Is this a job you have to have to pay bills, or is this "walking around" money? IF you are picking between spare cash and god grades...pick grades.

[/quote]

Its not "walking around money". Most of it is gas (Its a Tech school with no dorms) and text book money. Otherwise I would drop the part time job lol.

[quote="Charlotte1776, post:6, topic:226439"]
It's better to drop a class than fail it, though as another poster said your school work needs to be priority number one as much as possible. There are many students now who have no choice but to work through school so cutting back hours or switching jobs is not possible for them, however.

How far along are you in school? Keep in mind that the farther you go in your major, the more work you are going to have. If you have to work to support yourself in college, maybe going part time would be a better option. It is better to take a few classes and do well in them than to take a full load and do poorly or fail.

Whatever you do, just don't make the mistake of abandoning school to work full time!

[/quote]

I'm working on two degrees. Automotive Technology then business management (What a combo lol). The biggest thing is getting this quarter done because after this quarter I can do my core classes online and my automotive classes don't have much homework (You really cant take it home with you lol)

So basically my plan is to each quarter take a couple of core classes (online) and the rest my automotive classes. Then when I graduate the automotive part I will transfer to Saint Leo University and get my bachelors in business management through them online. I just got to figure out what to do about the quarter I am in lol.

My first two quarters I did one core class and the rest automotive and did just fine. But silly me decided to do all core stuff on campus this quarter :rolleyes:


#8

For me, graduating college was not on a time table. I worked full-time and attended college full-time. When enrolling, I was usually too ambitious and bit off more than I could chew. I dropped several classes. I had to take U.S. history three times! I just could not stay awake in that class.

GPA was not a high priority. I concentrated on technical classes and those in my major. Other required courses were not important to me. I aimed for a "C". It seems to me that in the work place, GPA is not a consideration, except for perhaps your first job after graduation. After you are working in the field, future employers only care that you graduated and focus their attention on your accomplishments at work.


#9

My husband and I were both working full time and going to school full time when our first daughter was born. While it was tough and there were many days and nights that we were not sure how we were going to manage - both emotionally and financially - we stayed the course. Pray hard and God will give you strength. I am a firm believer that He only gives us as much as He thinks we can handle. When you are finished, you can breathe a sigh of relief and be proud you finished!


#10

[quote="MtnDwellar, post:8, topic:226439"]
It seems to me that in the work place, GPA is not a consideration, except for perhaps your first job after graduation. After you are working in the field, future employers only care that you graduated and focus their attention on your accomplishments at work.

[/quote]

This is generally true, but if you ever want to get a more advanced degree a good GPA might be the difference between getting into a program or not.


#11

[quote="stockbrick240, post:1, topic:226439"]
I'm currently working while in school and I was unprepared and caught off guard by the homework load this quarter and have falling behind because of it. Has anyone here ever had to drop there classes during a quarter/semester? I don't want to but I'm wondering if dropping them and going into next quarter prepared would be good.

[/quote]

you might be able to make up the missed class but it will take much longer to make up for the time and money you will lose. give up everything else except church, work and school, including computer time that is not related to those commitments, and get the work done. dropped classes will also affect your gpa forever, I know it happened to me. I did make up the work and should have gotten credit, but the professor did not take care of it before he left on sabbatical, so that F will always haunt me.

now you have a better idea of how many hours you can handle so plan better for next semester. better to get A's in 2 courses than Cs in 4.


#12

[quote="stockbrick240, post:1, topic:226439"]
I'm currently working while in school and I was unprepared and caught off guard by the homework load this quarter and have falling behind because of it. Has anyone here ever had to drop there classes during a quarter/semester? I don't want to but I'm wondering if dropping them and going into next quarter prepared would be good.

[/quote]

A lot of kids go through this. They did well enough in high school with procrastinating. But once they get to college, they learn that they can't wait until the night before the test to start studying 800 pages of chemistry. This happened to me, and in my first semester in college, I brought home several "Cs" on my report card. My dad was furious and told me to step it up or no more money would be forthcoming for tuition.

I stepped it up. I learned how to study everyday and keep up with my schoolwork, and earned straight As for the rest of my college matriculation.

I'm confident that you will do the same and that you will learn how to juggle work and school.

It's a known fact that kids who are busy get better grades. My daughters were competitive figure skaters; they were members of one of the best synchronized skating teams in the U.S. and missed up to 30 days of high school each year. They still managed to earn straight As, take and pass several AP courses, and stay involved with church and other community activities. They learned to study in the car on the way to competitions, between events at competitions, and in the hotel rooms at competitions.

They continued to do well in college, in spite of working as coaches at their local rinks. My older daughter worked every night at the many theaters in her college city, but she still graduated with a 3.79 GPA (the one B was in required biology). And my younger daughter coached all the way through undergrad and grad school, and still graduated with a 4.0 GPA.

Busy people accomplish more because they know that they CAN'T procrastinate. They have to "do it now."

Keep in mind that colleges WANT you to go to their school (and pay tuition) for more than four years. That's how they make money. They COUNT on you messing up and taking an extra semester or year. Go ahead and drop the courses this year so that the bad grades don't mess up your record. But now you are wise--do NOT allow yourself to fall behind and get sucked into an "extra semester" again.

I disagree that grades aren't important. It depends on your field. There is so much competition for good jobs in the U.S. today--I would be wary of assuming that tech careers don't require good grades. If it comes down to you or someone else in a job interview, and both of you are equal in skills and experience, and both of you are the same color and sex, the company might just decide to take the applicant with the high GPA. Be careful--don't make assumptions that were true ten years ago. The rules are changing in the U.S. job market.

In the medical fields, a poor GPA or even an average GPA will definitely keep you out of the field. One of my friend's daughters was in a pre-pharmacy program and was required to earn a 3:5 GPA. She earned a 3.4 GPA, and was NOT admitted into the pharmacy program at that school or any other school. It was a bitter blow to her and her family, as she had never really made any contingency plans. She just assumed that somehow, everything would work out and that grades weren't that important. Yes, they were. Don't take any chances--if you CAN earn As, do so. Someday you might decide you want to apply to medical school, and they won't take Bs and Cs.


#13

I agree with the other posters who have suggested looking for a new job that's more flexible and pays better. If that isn't an option (for example if your current job is giving you important experience that you'll use in your future career), it may be wise to consider dropping a class under certain circumstances:

  • If you're sure you'll be able to re-take the class without delaying your graduation by more than a quarter (maybe you could take it during an accelerated summer session?)
  • if you're able to drop the class before your school's drop deadline. It wouldn't make sense to drop a class that you still have to pay for or explain on your transcript.

Good luck! I remember how hard it was to organize school/work/life in undergrad - and now that I'm working 30+ hours a week, taking 2 graduate-level classes, and planning a May wedding, undergrad sounds like a cakewalk!


#14

If you have to, cut back on work hours and make up for it by cutting back on food bills. Eat spaghetti, peanut butter and jam sandwiches, ramen noodles, etc. Do your parents live nearby? If they do, ask them if it's okay to take your laundry once a week over and get it done there (for free). Obviously thank them for the favor, stay if they insist on dinner, etc. Would it be possible for you to get a bus pass to your college? I did that and it saved a lot on parking and gas money.


#15

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