Worship


#1

As a Protestant, we clap, sing and sometimes dance in our service. We enjoy the presence of the Lord. Is there anytime in which Catholics dance and sing and just fully let loose unto the Lord? I know that the mass is a respectful and quiet service, what’s outside of a typical mass? As a person thinking of converting, this is the only thing I have not seen in the Catholic church that I’d miss in the Protestant church. Thank you for any information


#2

As Humans we are all emotional beings…but that is one thing that is different about us vs Prot services… I find that my emotions are still active…to the point that I am crying with joy or with the intense presence of the Lord. I don’t miss the rampant emotionalism of Protestantism at all. I found it distracting from the presence of God. For Catholics Life itself is the time for singing, clapping, and joy in the Lord…because he is living within us and touches every part of our daily lives.
Consider this poem by Hillare Belloc called "The Catholic Sun

Wherever the Catholic sun doth shine,
There’s always laughter and good red wine.
At least I’ve always found it so.
Benedicamus Domino!

Pax vobiscum,


#3

[quote=mikie]As a Protestant, we clap, sing and sometimes dance in our service. We enjoy the presence of the Lord. Is there anytime in which Catholics dance and sing and just fully let loose unto the Lord? I know that the mass is a respectful and quiet service, what’s outside of a typical mass? As a person thinking of converting, this is the only thing I have not seen in the Catholic church that I’d miss in the Protestant church. Thank you for any information
[/quote]

Some Churches have a folk Mass once a month that you would enjoy; guitars, violins, trumpets, flutes, cello and other instruments accompany the organ music. The Mass is sung throughout and there is rhythmic clapping during the singing of the Gloria. :clapping: :clapping: :clapping:, and some parishes allow dancing :dancing: :dancing: :dancing:

But I do not think it is as energetic as what you would be used to, and it depends on the parish itself and to what the Priest allows in his Church.

In the Church I attend we have a folk Mass every second Sunday where the children normally take part.

But give me Tradition any day of the week :yup:


#4

As Michael said above, every day we live is a time for enjoyment and celebration. But, on Sunday at mass is a time for worshiping God and Christ. Remember, God is in the still small voice[1Kings19;11-12].


#5

They have a thing in my diocese which is called XLT Adoration. It consists of a half hour of what you described, followed by a half hour talk (the one time I went it was about the Real Presence), and then the Blessed Sacrament is exposed for a half hour of Adoration. Sounds like something you might like.


#6

Worship entails the offering of a sacrifice, not just prayers and music. While there is nothing inherently wrong in lively music at Mass, it should not distract from the Eucharist, which is the main reason we are there–to offer up the one sacrifice of Christ for our sins, not to play tambourines and dance. :wink:


#7

Outside of the Mass there are often celebrations. At my old parish they celebrate Oktoberfest, have ‘Sock-hops’ (seperate for adults & youth), St Patty’s day celebrations…lots of extra-Mass activities.

Just remember…Wine was created from the beginning to make men joyful, and not to make them drunk (Ecclesiasticus 31:35). So don’t drink too much at the party!

It just depends on the parish…some are more active than others.


#8

This is interesting.

My Pastor just did a sermon on this subject. And of course I’ve lost all my notes. Dang!

There were many biblical references to clapping, shouting, dancing to the Lord. Sorry for teasing you without my notes to provide verses.

I’ve seen many churches in my area offer different “styles” of worship services at different times.

Typically the early service is very traditional with hymns etc.
The later (I assume because teenagers don’t get up early on Sunday) service is more contemporay with more modern instruments and singing.


#9

[quote=ruzz]There were many biblical references to clapping, shouting, dancing to the Lord. Sorry for teasing you without my notes to provide verses.

[/quote]

I know David danced before the Lord (2 Sam. 6:14). Hope that helps.:dancing:

As far as I know, however, no one danced at the Last Supper, on Calvary, or in the temple when the sacrafice was offered up, which is why we traditionally don’t during the Mass.:thumbsup:


#10

[quote=Genesis315]I know David danced before the Lord (2 Sam. 6:14). Hope that helps.:dancing:

As far as I know, however, no one danced at the Last Supper, on Calvary, or in the temple when the sacrafice was offered up, which is why we traditionally don’t during the Mass.:thumbsup:
[/quote]

No, I don’t think whooping it up is ever appropriate in the context of the last supper or the crucifixion.

.


#11

[quote=ruzz]No, I don’t think whooping it up is ever appropriate in the context of the last supper or the crucifixion.

[/quote]

Oh, I wasn’t implying that you did. I was just trying to help you out with your verse quote. The rest was for the original poster more than anything:)


#12

Lord…please save me from liturgical dance… i can stand almost anything but liturgical dance…

forgive me, i really must work on being more tollerant…


#13

[quote=Church Militant]As Humans we are all emotional beings…but that is one thing that is different about us vs Prot services… I find that my emotions are still active…to the point that I am crying with joy or with the intense presence of the Lord. I don’t miss the rampant emotionalism of Protestantism at all. I found it distracting from the presence of God. For Catholics Life itself is the time for singing, clapping, and joy in the Lord…because he is living within us and touches every part of our daily lives.
Consider this poem by Hillare Belloc called "The Catholic Sun

Wherever the Catholic sun doth shine,
There’s always laughter and good red wine.
At least I’ve always found it so.
Benedicamus Domino!-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Hi C.M. Its amazing what a little red wine will do to the mind. As for me I,ll drink the New Wine, the same that was given out on the day of pentacost. :thumbsup: God Bless

Pax vobiscum,
[/quote]


#14

My church has seperate “praise and worship” style services for those who are inclined to do so in addition to the mass. These are two entirely seperate things, obviously everyone is expected to go to mass, and if they want more of the pop-culture style of song and whatnot, then there is a group like that they can go to in addition, at which they can sing/dance.

Remember that at our mass, we are on Calvery, under the shadow of the cross where the Lord was sacrificed. We just don’t sing and clap and make merry when the Lord is suffering for us.


#15

Here are a few articles of interest:

Dance has never constituted an essential part in the official liturgy of the Latin Church. If local Churches have introduced the dance, at times even in the temples, this was on occasion of feasts in order to show feelings of jubilation and devotion. But the dance always took place outside the liturgical actions. Conciliar decisions have often condemned the religious dance, as not befitting worship, and also because it could degenerate into disorders . . . hence, it is not possible to introduce something of that sort in the liturgical celebration; it would mean bringing into the liturgy one of the most desacralized and desacralizing elements: and this would mean the same as introducing an atmosphere of profanity, which would easily suggest to those present worldly places and profane situations." [Notitiae (Instructions for Sacraments and Divine Worship) Vol. XI, (1975) pp. 202-205]

“Since liturgical celebrations are not private acts but celebrations of the Church, the ‘sacrament of unity,’ their regulation is dependent solely upon the hierarchical authority of the Church. The liturgy belongs to the whole body of the Church. It is for this reason that it is not permitted to anyone, even a priest, or any group to add, subtract or change anything whatsoever on their own initiative. Fidelity to the rites and to the authentic texts of the liturgy is a requirement of the lex orandi (law of praying), which must always be in conformity with the lex credendi (law of believing). A lack of fidelity on this point may even affect the very validity of the sacraments.”** [Pope John Paul II on the 25th Anniversary of the Liturgical Constitution, December 4, 1988] **

“None of these things (liturgical innovations) can bring good results. The consequences are—and cannot fail to be—the impairing of the unity of faith and worship in the Church, doctrinal uncertainty, scandal, and bewilderment among the People of God, and the near inevitability of violent reactions… The faithful have a right to a true liturgy, which means the liturgy desired and laid down by the Church. Undue experimentation, changes and creativity bewilder the faithful. The Second Vatican Council’s admonition in this regard must be remembered: ‘No person, even if he be a priest, may add, remove or change anything in the liturgy on his own authority’.” [Pope John Paul II, April 17, 1980]

So Liturgical dancing is not permitted during the celebration of the Mass. Dancing can be done outside of the liturgy. If some dancers want to do their thing in my opinion it should be done in the hall. My recommendation would be to find a good Charismatic Prayer meeting that is obedient to the magisterium. They dance, jump, clap, shout “hallelujah” etc., etc. I used to do that years back.

[font=Comic Sans MS]However, my understanding is that Liturgical dancing is permitted in Africa since it is part of some African cultures, but not in the West, including Canada. [/font]


#16

from what i have learned about my own faith on these forums, and from what i have witnessed, i would say that the catholic mass will be ALOT different from what you are used to. our mass is about deep meditation and prayer towards God (We are celebrating the Last Supper - verrry serious time). i know that my parish has many more social events outside of this though. There are men’s groups, women’s groups, youth group, bible study, we hold parish picnics and easter egg hunts for kids, ect. i would talk to your local parish priest and maybe some parishners and see what they have to say about your church’s social aspect. may the Holy Spirit guide you as you consider converting. i will be praying for you.


#17

[quote=Della]Worship entails the offering of a sacrifice, not just prayers and music. While there is nothing inherently wrong in lively music at Mass, it should not distract from the Eucharist, which is the main reason we are there–to offer up the one sacrifice of Christ for our sins, not to play tambourines and dance. :wink:
[/quote]

Someone needs to send this to the parishes then.
But I must agree the greatest joy in the Catholic Church is being able to receive the Eucharist the Body and Blood of Christ every single day. Love, joy, happiness, and peace are all fulfilled in receiving our Lord and knowing that He loved us that much to die for us.


#18

We have a Life Teen Mass at 6 pm that does guitar and band music when its time to sing. This opposed to the more traditional mass at 11am. Also there is no shortage of activities and gatherings that are through the church. We still have picnics, lunchins etc. My church even does a big Octoberfest festival to raise money every year. Even the priest has fun there, last year I saw him with a big cigar and a stein of beer in hand. LOL


#19

[quote=mikie]As a Protestant, we clap, sing and sometimes dance in our service. We enjoy the presence of the Lord. Is there anytime in which Catholics dance and sing and just fully let loose unto the Lord? I
[/quote]

you’re thinking of bingo night
seriously, I have been to Protestant services that are just as staid, but I will allow yawl do music a lot better than a lot of Catholic Churches. If you enjoy a charistmatic style of worship, plenty of Catholic parishes whose members are active in the Catholic Charismatic Renewal incorporate some of that style in their worship, although probably not to the degree or with the emotionalism of a lot of Pentecostals. If you yearn for the beatiful classic hymns, anthems, organ, choircs enjoyed by the large Lutheran and Methodist congregations my sister sings for, you can find Catholic Churches that have retained the best of sacred music. If you find a parish with a Life Teen Mass you will find plenty of praise and worship contemporary Christian style.

the bottom line is, as you have noted, the holy Sacrifice of the Mass, the Eucharist, is the focal point, and all music, ritual and activity serves the liturgy and must be in keeping with the liturgy, the liturgical season and feast, and hopefully reflect the theme of the readings of the day. Full active participation in the Mass implies that we respond with voice, posture, song and gestures at the appropriate times.


#20

You might also consider a Newman Center Parish; found close to university campuses. They are full of college students and rather boisterous.


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