Would Latin be an "alive(?)" language?

I was just wondering. Because the Church uses latin all the time. epecially in the Vatican city, wouldn’t that mean that Latin is not a dead lanuage, becuase a country has it as its officail lanuage?

tam beata est, eam etiam vivam esse cupio

The problem with Latin is, one learns it by written translations only and not by speaking and listening. And that is a shame. It is such a beautiful language.

[quote=Montie Claunch]Because the Church uses Latin all the time. epecially in the Vatican city, wouldn’t that mean that Latin is not a dead lanuage, becuase a country has it as its officail lanuage?
[/quote]

Although Vatican City is a sovereign state, it is not a “country” in the ordinary sense of the word. There are few (if any) “regular households” (families). It is comprised of folks from all over the globe - but nobody who lives there speaks Latin as a first language - it is only used among people who share no other common language. Latin does not naturally change, develop, or grow (as do “living” languages such as English or German).

I do not know of anyone on earth for whom Latin is their first language.

[quote=DavidFilmer]I do not know of anyone on earth for whom Latin is their first language.
[/quote]

That is because none exist. Latin is classified as a dead language because of two reasons:
(1) It no longer naturally evolves (as stated above), and
(2) No-one speaks it as a native language. It is always learned on top of someones native language.

You know what…
If i ever end up having children, i will teach my firstborn to speak latin first, instead of english, just to make things complicated, and just to get rid of one of the hurdles. I will limit his/her exposure to english… ohhh, it will be fun…

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