Would this be a sin? - Video Emulators

So if someone purchases a game on a game boy and played it ten years ago, still has the game and a gameboy but due to the advancements on technology, downloads an emulator to play that game on their iPhone/iPad. Would that be a sin of theft? Because the person has supported the official content creator by purchasing their game in the past, still has it but just wants to play it on an emulator for convenience. E.g Pokemon Silver/Gold for example, someone has the game but wants to play it on an iPhone emulator instead.

No it’s not

Goosfraba

You bought the game and paid for it. You get to play it.

Unless the game designer added a clause demanding that you agree to play it only on the original device, and you agreed to that clause when you bought it, I see no difficulty in using a different device to play the game you paid for.

My thoughts exactly.

That word is copyrighted, patented, trademarked, and tattooed on the inside of my left eyelid. You’ll be receiving my cease-and-desist letter shortly.

en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fair_use

My attorney shall enjoy getting paid by you :stuck_out_tongue:

With what? Buttons or beach rocks? :rolleyes:

I do not think it would be a sin. The product was legally purchased in the first place.

I could tell it was too good for free public use :smiley:

Ed

Here is what Nintendo thinks:

nintendo.com/corp/legal.jsp

Best,
Ed

What, if anything, does ‘goosfraba’ mean?

The fact that a video game company is no longer selling certain games does not imply that they no longer have any rights over those games and that digital copies of those games can be used however one should like to use them.

Is it objective mortal sin to play such games? No, that’s very unlikely.

But it is a minor form of stealing, and it is a willingness to break civil law without a remotely valid reason for doing so. I’m sorry, but these laws, IMO, are by no means unjust.

I would encourage you to consider that willfully committing venial sin is an awful habit.

If you mean breaking civil law, as opposed to ecclesial law, I would agree. But if you mean civil law as opposed to criminal law, I do not know if I do. Whether this is stealing or not would really be up to the courts. Sometimes the copyright owners win. Sometimes they lose. Either way, the action in consideration is not criminal. As money was actually exchanged for the use of this game initially, I do not think it black and white that it is stealing to use what was bought in a manner inconsistent with what the seller wanted.

They can say anything they want.
But the bottom line is that the tech involved in these emulators was not even dreamt of when the game was sold.
The agreement the consumer agreed to does not address them.

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