Would You Catholics Go With Hubby And Kids To A Mid-week Non-denom Church?


#1

:confused: Hi! I’m kinda confused here, need some advice. As a new convert, I’m puzzled if I should go with my hubby and teens to a mid-week non-denom church, or if I should even encourage or discourage them to go. I know it most likely is “anti-Catholic” as I have begun to discover most of these “non-denom” churches definately are. I just don’t know. On one hand they’re worshipping God, reading Scripture, singing, etc., but on the other, they might hear negative stuff turning them off against Catholicism. And I so hope and pray they will convert one day, if it is God’s Will, of course.

Which is worse for them?-- going to this or sitting home watching TV and getting nothing spiritual at all? They are saying they want to go tonite and want me to come too!!! YIKES! I know it does seem to help them spiritually!!!

Thanks for your input!!!

P.S. We’ve gone together to this mid-week thing for a couple years now. I’ve only heard 1 negative anti-Catholic thing–when my teen’s youth director said “Catholics pray to Mary and that’s wrong”…I set him straight of course–(son and youth director) --who I found out was raised a Catholic!!! It was neat that my son told me that he said this*

What do ya’all think???


#2

I think it would be best if you found something at your church to go to. Are the rest of your family Catholic? Just wondering since you called this man your child’s youth miniser. If you are all Catholic, then perhaps find a similar activity at your church. Have you discussed it with your priest?


#3

NO I would not go to Non-denom Church for a service. IMHO if you want to go to a mid-week service you can find one in your own parish or one close to you. Very rarely am I un-able to find a Mass near me any day of the week.
Also Catholic prayer groups are usually easy to find by looking in your weekly announcements.
We homeschool and have found it quite easy to have good Catholic Fellowship and friends.

Kathleen Elsie Gibbs

Pray the Rosary and Divine Mercy daily


#4

You should avoid the schismatic Protestant churches like the plague. Your kids need to get a solid foundation built on the rock, the corner stone.

When you build a house do you pour half a foundation then frame the house then pour some more foundation that does not match the first?

Don’t confuse your kids with schismatic teachings by Protestants. Stay loyal to the Church Christ founded, His body, His Catholic Church. There is no need to go to any other, that is, if Jesus is enough for you in your life?

You and your spouse could go and help correct the false theologies in those mid week Protestant sevices. They need your light to help bring them out of the darkness they exist in. Some of the funnyist things I ever heard were some of the things Baptists told me they believed. Sometimes my wife and I broke out in open laughter when they expressed their opinions/beliefs. I tried to hold in the laughter but sometimes it just came out. At first I thought they were joking with us but quickly learned they were serious.

PS. Don’t forget to to shake the dust off your feet when you leave their churches. They should have a door mat at the door to help you get the dust off when you leave. I do it every time I leave a Protestant church now. My wife, still a Protestant by the way, knows not to follow too closely since I stop at the door to do as Scripture commands when I leave their hobo stew of theological opinions.


#5

You should definitely not go. Actually, I think it was largely accepted as a mortal sin before Vatican II.


#6

[quote=challenger]You should definitely not go. Actually, I think it was largely accepted as a mortal sin before Vatican II.
[/quote]

I have a hard time believing it’s a mortal sin simply to visit a non-Catholic church. Can you provide examples of Church teaching stating that this is a mortal sin?


#7

[quote=sparkle] :confused: Hi! I’m kinda confused here, need some advice. As a new convert, I’m puzzled if I should go with my hubby and teens to a mid-week non-denom church, or if I should even encourage or discourage them to go. I know it most likely is “anti-Catholic” as I have begun to discover most of these “non-denom” churches definately are. I just don’t know. On one hand they’re worshipping God, reading Scripture, singing, etc., but on the other, they might hear negative stuff turning them off against Catholicism. And I so hope and pray they will convert one day, if it is God’s Will, of course.

Which is worse for them?-- going to this or sitting home watching TV and getting nothing spiritual at all? They are saying they want to go tonite and want me to come too!!! YIKES! I know it does seem to help them spiritually!!!

Thanks for your input!!!

P.S. We’ve gone together to this mid-week thing for a couple years now. I’ve only heard 1 negative anti-Catholic thing–when my teen’s youth director said “Catholics pray to Mary and that’s wrong”…I set him straight of course–(son and youth director) --who I found out was raised a Catholic!!! It was neat that my son told me that he said this*

What do ya’all think???

[/quote]

First, a question: Is your husband Catholic?

If he is, then there is no reason to be going as a Catholic family to any other church. Though they usually have the truth in part, they can’t teach you all of it, and they may inadvertently teach you falsehoods. Why not put in a phonecall to your diocese and see what’s available during the week?

If he’s not Catholic, things are a bit different. Since the husband is the head of the household, it’s important that you honor him. This doesn’t mean convert to non-denominational, by any means! It just means you’re on uncomfortable ground. I haven’t seen any evidence in Church teaching thus far to lead me to believe it is a sin for you to visit one of these services, so long as you don’t go in place of Mass and don’t take communion with them. I don’t think I’d personally be comfortable going on a regular basis.

Have you talked with any of the women at your parish about this? They might have some great wisdom to share.:yup:


#8

If you are looking for a specific statement, I can’t drag one out right now. However, if there is danger that your faith would be weakened, then it borders on, at least, testing God.

If you have a strong faith foundation and a legitimate purpose for attending, then you would be permitted to attend. For example, a non-denominational Bible study is something you could participate in. It would, however, be better to participate in a Catholic bible study, all things being equal (which they rarely are…).

The Church does not hold that attending something at another church is automatically a sin. However, there are numerous Catholics who have drifted from, or outright quit, the Catholic Church, and the roots of that are in their a) lack of firm foundation, coupled with b) attending other churches.


#9

In light of the example of our recently deceased Pope, I am surprised at the unanimous advice to not go. It sounds like the one comment made that would be objectionable to Catholics was dealt with in a constructive manner.

There will be no growth, no reconciliation without dialogue.

As two recent prominent popes have stated “That which seperates us a believers in Christ is less than that which unites us.”

Any group of people who gather to know Christ better and to share Christ with others will not lead anyone away from Catholicism, because Catholicism is about Christ. Only a more complete picture of Christ.

Engaging in dialogue requires that a person have strength in their own faith. If you didn’t have any such strength then perhaps going would not be so wise but it appears that you have considerable strength of faith.

Go,… and let them be concerned about the strength of their own faith, maybe you will lead them to something better, something more complete.

-Jim


#10

I actually had this situation come up when my daughter was invited to her friends christian church. I talked to a priest about it and he frowned and said he didn’t advise it. It can really confuse a teen and it is very easy for them to give up religion all together.

Luckily, my daughter went once and didn’t want to go back.
My feelings are not to do it. The Catholic Church has everything. Causing confusion can definitely work against you.


#11

Tell them you will gladly go if they will go to Mass with you on Sundays (if they dont’ agree, then maybe one of the daily Masses once perweek) and take RCIA (they can take it without converting) so they will be able to understand more about your religion. Tell them there are alot of misunderstandings about catholic Doctrine and you want them to know fact from fiction, tell them they don’t have to agree with it but you want them to know exactly what the Church teaches and why. Also tell them if the minister starts bashing the Catholic Church you will need to step out until he is finished. If they aren’t ready to take such a big step by taking a formal RCIA class, at least give them materials to read such as the Catechism. Tell them that you want them to have it for reference in case they need to know what the Church teaches on a particular subject. If you haven’t already begun a library of apologetics, start. Have pleanty of good apologetics books on hand, you can let them know they are there, but don’t be too pushy about it, let them go at their own pace, just be a gentle guide along the way.

God Bless you

Ask Jesus for the Grace you need to be the mother He has called you to be. Motherhood and marriage are a vocation, and you need to try really hard not to get too frustrated. If any of them do convert it could take years. If they never convert, you need to at least have a close, loving relationship

This will be a spiritual challenge. Read about St. Monica and ask for her prayers, as well as Mary. The chaplet of divine mercy would also be wonderful for you. You can also pray the prayer of St. Joseph for your husband and ask for his special prayers for your husband’s conversion. I have done this for my husband.


#12

[quote=Kyenta]I actually had this situation come up when my daughter was invited to her friends christian church. I talked to a priest about it and he frowned and said he didn’t advise it. It can really confuse a teen and it is very easy for them to give up religion all together.

Luckily, my daughter went once and didn’t want to go back.
My feelings are not to do it. The Catholic Church has everything. Causing confusion can definitely work against you.

[/quote]

I woud definitely agree with the priest, In this situation with your daughter. but since this lady is an adult and needs to continue her relationship with her family, it might be good to give a little especially if it is in exchange for her husband and kids giving a litte, and if it gives them a better understanding of the Catholic church they will at least know the Truth. If they are not willing to give (ie, go to Mass or RCIA or other CAtholic religion class, read the CAtechism etc) then I would decline to go.


#13

[quote=otm]If you are looking for a specific statement, I can’t drag one out right now. However, if there is danger that your faith would be weakened, then it borders on, at least, testing God.

If you have a strong faith foundation and a legitimate purpose for attending, then you would be permitted to attend. For example, a non-denominational Bible study is something you could participate in. It would, however, be better to participate in a Catholic bible study, all things being equal (which they rarely are…).

The Church does not hold that attending something at another church is automatically a sin. However, there are numerous Catholics who have drifted from, or outright quit, the Catholic Church, and the roots of that are in their a) lack of firm foundation, coupled with b) attending other churches.
[/quote]

I agree with this. if you start noticing your own faith and beliefs being shaken, take some time to yourself to “regroup”

I woud DEFINITELY advise against a nondenom Bible study. I went to one in the spirit of ecuminism with a nondenom. friend of my and it was a bad experience. It would be very good for you to feed yourself with a Catholic Bible study.


#14

As a convert from such a church I do attend very seldom with my mother and family because they have yet to see the light :smiley: – BUT I don’t send my kids to their nursery school and when something comes up that I don’t agree with I whisper in my older DDs ear what it is and why that’s not how our church does things –

I would not go if I didn’t feel I had a firm foundation in my own faith and enough answers in my back pocket to defeat anything they can come up with on a whim.

So I’d go, and smile (if your family isn’t Catholic especially) and then invite them to mass with you – if something blatently anti-Catholic shows up you can explain matter-of-factly why the Catholic church does such a thing.


#15

well, i go to a pentacostal church average once a week(i am catholic to the last drop of blood), but my reason to go is that my girlfriend is pentacostal, and for now, i am keeping it even, she comes with me, i go with her. a very scriptural and traditional preist told me that it is fine to attend non-catholic prayer services, for the praise and worship, and prayer portion. listen to the teachings, but be sure you understand your own beleifs, and do not accept pretty much anything they say. just remember where the truth is. as for yourself Sparkle, untill your family is deeply knowledgable and strongly founded, i recommend you enjoy youth/family activities within your own church, as difficult as it can be to find if your from a small town like me…


#16

Hi Sparkle,

Here is my situation.

Raised Catholic, came to saving faith in Jesus in a Baptist church and spent the next 30-plus years in the Evangelical community attending many different denominations and non-denoms.

Now, I am back. My wife, who loves the Lord, raised Evangelical, is confused, but accepts my decision. I go to Vigil Mass on Saturday, and attend a non-denom Evangelical church on Sunday morning with my wife. This is her church.

Here’s the irony. The Evangelical pastor, an ex-Catholic (he NEVER bashes Catholicism) spent last summer on a sabbatical studying contemplative prayer in monasteries here and abroad.

Now, his preaching is filled with references to Catholic saints and their spirituality: Benedict, Antony, Francis, Mother Teresa, Teresa of Avila, John of the Cross, Augustine, and many more. I feel it is only a matter of time before he “comes home.” I am friendly with him and have asked him about all these saints and their devotion to the Eucharist. He said he and his wife are still working through what they learned last summer. I always take the time after services to discuss the Catholic references in his sermons with my wife.

Anyway, I attend for several reasons. I want to keep the peace wiht my wife, plus I enjoy this man’s preaching. I am able to discern truth from error and disregard the error when I come across it. But not everyone can do this. You have to learn your faith. Plus, don’t forget that these people love the Lord Jesus and there is a sweet fellowship in many Evangelical congregations that you don’t always find in Catholic parishes.

However, my pastor has asked me to get involved in the parish so I may have to give up attending the Evangelical church. I know where the Truth is.

As a matter of fact, there is a Catholic parish near where I live that is planning an evangelication drive. At an open parish council, someone asked why Evangelical churches seem to be thriving. The vicar said there were two reasons; the dynamic preaching and the fellowship/hospitality.

Also, I have heard what I consider to be error coming from some Catholic Bible studies I’ve attended. The Catholic Church is a large organism and there are many forces fighting within her to take her off the course of Truth. I think you have to be discerning even in Mass and other Catholic services. Know your faith and know your pastors.

Grace and peace to you,
Gene


#17

[quote=trogiah]There will be no growth, no reconciliation without dialogue.
[/quote]

That is absolutely 100% completely true. But as a father, I view it as my absolutely primary task to make sure my kid gets to heaven. If sending my teen to a Protestant service will confuse him, and I think it would, then I view it as my primary responsibility to make sure he doesn’t go. Of course, this all also depends on the individual kid. Ecumenism is good, but it is secondary to family considerations.


#18

Let’s look at the original question:

As a new convert, I’m puzzled if I should go with my hubby and teens to a mid-week non-denom church, or if I should even encourage or discourage them to go.

First of all, why are THEY going? Are they seeking, or are they truly members of this church?

If they are seeking, lead them gently to the Catholic Church. But do not create a riff in your family – “Do unto others as you would have them to unto you.” That includes showing respect for their beliefs and practices.

If you go, you also have leverage – “I went to your service, now come to mine.”

As a new convert, you may not be well equipped to answer some of the canned attacks many Protestants make on Catholicism. But if you bring your family to mass (in return for attending this mid-week service) you can respond to such attacks by simply saying, “We’ll ask so-and-so about that after Mass next week.”

So I’d say, go with your family if that’s what they want, and lead them to Catholicism by example.


#19

…you going with Hubby is one thing… taking children, and i mean small children is entirely another…

if you go, make sure you don’t forget to meet your obligation of sunday worship, or you could comply with vigil service on saturday…

…take it from someone who has been there… (and it’s your decision)… don’t do it, don’t start it, it just opens a can of worms… will cause heartache (IMHO) down the road…

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#20

[quote=surfinpure]I have a hard time believing it’s a mortal sin simply to visit a non-Catholic church. Can you provide examples of Church teaching stating that this is a mortal sin?
[/quote]

In the 1962 Missal, if you look at the section for Confession, there are a number of suggested items listed to help you realize whether you’ve committed a sin that needs to be confessed. One of these items is “Did you attend worship services of another denomination?”

The Missal carries an imprimatur and nihil obstat.

Now this only shows that Catholics at one time considered it a sin. Who knows where this stands nowadays. I’m certain you can easily find two bishops with opposing views on the matter.


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