Would you interrupt an offensive homily?

Being an Atheist I would probably do nothing because just simply stepping into a church is voluntarily opening myself to be insulted so what right would I have to complain?

BUT, if I were religious I would think that bringing up the offense privately with the preist would be the most prudent course of action for all involved. Kind of start off with kindness and politeness and then get most assertive if the offense continues.

And here it is:

[/FONT]Effective Lay Witness Protocol

[SIGN]You rock.[/SIGN]

:clapping:

:amen:

hi, I’m currently waiting for a book on incorruptible bodies…and i bought a book about eucharistic miracles too (amazon buy two for less offer :-D)

erm…I know it sounds silly, but why was the mass stopped? Why not just continue? I know it sounds silly…but …I think you’re talking about this thing where the bread and wine changed physically…I’ve not ever heard anything about this, but why did they stop it? Is it because nobody wanted to eat it?

S

<<I’ve only heard of 1 mass that was stopped and that is pretty famous… ie: the bread and wine turned into flesh and blood… check the net>>

On this story, if this happened, then the oblata were NOT the Body and Blood of Christ.

The SUBSTANCE of the Savior exists UNDER THE ACCIDENTS and APPEARANCES of bread and wine. If they cease to look like bread and wine, the sacramental status ceases.

As far as interrupting a homily, it would be more polite and more charitable to ask the priest privately about the points you took exception to. There’s always the possibility that you misunderstood him.

And then again, maybe it’s YOUR knowledge of the faith that’s in error.

Thank you for your responses. The only situation that I think it would be BEST to speak out during the mass is if the homily turns into a sort of rally for whatever thing the priest is preaching. I’ve heard of situations where priests have preached socially liberal homilies and the congregants have started to cheer them along. Or, perhaps if the liturgical abuses are so great that you have no doubt it’s not a mass… :o

[quote=bpbasilphx;2600187On this story, if this happened, then the oblata were NOT the Body and Blood of Christ.
]

why is this?.. and what’s the oblate? Is that just the appearance of the body and blood?.. why if it changed as a miracle would the sacramental status stop? in theory?

S
[/quote]

I remember some offensive homilies during my teenage and young adult years in my hometown in Missouri. In fact, once a visiting archbishop from another diocese used the opportunity to launch an angry tirade against Pope John Paul II about various issues. If that were to happen now, I would quietly leave the church with my family and attend Mass at another time and location that day. Later I would voice my concerns with the priest who gave the homily and also with the pastor (if two different people). I would give him the opportunity to explain his homily in the event that I may have misunderstood something. But if I believe that he deliberately caused scandal by his words or actions and was not sorry about it, I would contact the bishop. As a father of young children, it is important that I demonstrate my willingness to witness for Christ and His Church, even if it means standing up to a priest who is abusing his authority.

It’s even worse when the Bishop is the problem…sometimes it’s good to pray that our complains get through the bureaucracy…:wink:

would I interupt an offensive homily? No… I’ve posted earlier that I wold ask him or her afterwards

I remember a sermon…well several that were sat through where the priest (church of england) told people again and again that the Bible was not a history but a book of stories with morals… he believed it had a basic truth to it, but his interpreatation was very loose… so he believed in getting morals from the Bible but this morality did not depend on any truth within the pages

It sorted itself out though as the church demanded certain views of their next priest, the priest who had preached these things remains in the church as a curate (he was there by himself while a new priest was found)…

I don’t know if catholics have any say over what kind of priest they get, or what direction their church goes in… but this was a long term solution.

S

:yup:

<< I’ve heard of situations where priests have preached socially liberal homilies and the congregants have started to cheer them along.>>

Don’t fret that too much. Ss. John Chrystom and Augustine refer to people cheering during their sermons, too.

<<On this story, if this happened, then the oblata were NOT the Body and Blood of Christ.

The SUBSTANCE of the Savior exists UNDER THE ACCIDENTS and APPEARANCES of bread and wine. If they cease to look like bread and wine, the sacramental status ceases.

why is this?.. and what’s the oblate? Is that just the appearance of the body and blood?.. why if it changed as a miracle would the sacramental status stop? in theory?

The oblata are the bread and wine offered at the Eucharist.

And there’s no theory to what I said. If they no longer are recognizable as bread and wine, they are no longer the body and blood of Christ.

Otherwise, the word “transsubstantiation” means nothing.

[quote=bpbasilphx;2600591
]

i meant that…in theory…if this mirace occured (cos i know nothing about it yet)…and the offerings at the eucharist actually did change into the real body and blood then why is it not sacramental?

if catholics believe that the bread and wine are actually the real body and blood, then why stop the mass just cos it changed… is there a reason for this… i’m not doubting that you are right…

i just dont understand the reasons why.

S
[/quote]

<<i meant that…in theory…if this mirace occured (cos i know nothing about it yet)…and the offerings at the eucharist actually did change into the real body and blood then why is it not sacramental?

if catholics believe that the bread and wine are actually the real body and blood, then why stop the mass just cos it changed… is there a reason for this… i’m not doubting that you are right…

i just dont understand the reasons why.>>

I can’t speak for the Roman rite, but the instructions of the Russian Liturgikon (Missal) specifically say that should this happen, and the bread and/or wine taken on the appearance of flesh and blood, or a small child, the priest takes fresh bread and wine and tries again. Should such resume their proper appearance, they are NOT given out as communion, but are consumed after the ablutions.

One priest told his bishop about this happening, and the bishop said, “You’re suspended from celebrating the Liturgy until you get over that delusion.”

Exactly. And its what makes us who are faithful to the Magesterium, very, very sad and discouraged.

Don’t throw the baby out with the bath water. Shalom~

Interrupting a homily of any sort simply is unacceptable behaviour. It’s a sign of someone with no self control and a temper that borderlines on sociopathic. of course, that my opinion.

Drafting the letter to the local bishop, and keeping a copy of it sounds like a good answer…

I have walked out of a homily once when this priest was shaming the whole congregation instead of leading his flock by example…the priest was mirroring the same sort of behavior he was criticizing in the congregation and that really bothered me. He offered no solution to the behavior, he didn’t attempt to lead his flock, he simply put everyone down. I think if enough people had walked out at that moment a statement such as that would have been louder than any verbal comment/interruption that could have been made.

I sat outside the church until the homily was over then returned to the Mass though. That remains valid no matter who the priest.

Didn’t Jesus get rather angry in one of the Gospels when there was business being carried out in the temple other than that of Him and His Father?

What was saddest about it was that it was the first time I’d seen my mother in years, and we had to land at that church, at that homily.

DISCLAIMER: The views and opinions expressed in these forums do not necessarily reflect those of Catholic Answers. For official apologetics resources please visit www.catholic.com.