Would you let kids swim on your property?


#1

Several months ago, my husband and I bought a house on a lake. It’s in a busy neighborhood only a short walking distance from our downtown area, and as a result, there are always lots of kids around.

Today as I was pulling out of my driveway to run some errands, a couple of kids approached me and asked if they could swim in our backyard. They were probably in fifth or sixth grade. I hesitated. There’s a public beach not far away, but it’s $3 per person and they said that there were ten of them and they only had $10. I apologized but told them I wasn’t comfortable having them swim while I was gone because I’d be responsible if anything happened to them. They offered to have an older cousin watch them, but I still said no and left.

The thing is, I’m not crazy about having anyone swim on our property, whether I’m around or not. Is this selfish? Would you let neighborhood kids swim on your property? How would you explain it without sounding rude? Would you set up any ground rules?

In related news, when we first moved in, a very nice couple across the street said that the lady we bought the house from used to let their grandkids swim in the backyard and would it be okay if they continued to do this. I agreed without really thinking it through. Now I feel like we need to make some decisions and be consistent with everyone. So what do you think? Do I need to lighten up and let the kiddies swim? Only if there’s a parent nearby? Only if I’m around? Or can I still be loving and neighborly without letting anyone onto our property, and if so, how do I word this?


#2

If you are affirmatively allowing children to swim on your property without adult supervision around, you'd better have a long talk with your liability insurance carrier. If a child dies (or, worse from your financial perspective, almost dies but ends up paralyzed and in need of lifetime care) by drowning on your property, you're arguably on the hook.

Sure, you might conceivably win such a lawsuit. But the attorneys' fees could bankrupt you, even if a judgment against you doesn't.


#3

I would only allow select trusted neighbors who had signed (or who had their parents sign) a liability waiver that was vetted by a local attorney.


#4

Run your situation by your attorney and your insurance agent before you allow people who don’t live in your household to swim on your property. Follow their advice to the letter.


#5

THIS.


#6

If my fifth or sixth grade children asked you if they could use your lake, I’d *want *you to say no. Don’t feel guilty. Drowning is one of the leading causes of death for children.

I would only let someone swim on my property if I had invited them over, the parents knew, and someone (probably me) watched them carefully.


#7

Is your house one of several surrounding a big lake? Or is the lake completely on your property?


#8

[quote="rick43235, post:7, topic:246218"]
Is your house one of several surrounding a big lake? Or is the lake completely on your property?

[/quote]

It's one of several surrounding a big lake.


#9

There is NOTHING wrong with wanting to keep your property to yourself. It is YOUR house, why should you let people swin on it.

It has nothing to do with kids drowing. It is all about YOUR right to privacy on Your property.

Sounds like the neighbourhood will have to get use to the new owner

CM


#10

We live in such a litigious society and I would have to say no. Don’t feel guilty. I swam every day when I was a kid [in the summer] at the city public pool. My parents bought me a pass for the summer.


#11

This is very true. I bought a house that was owned by a family with several children. The other kids in the neighborhood were comfortable with diving from my pier whenever they desired.

I told the children that they shouldn’t enter my property without my permission because my rottweilers might attack them.

Was that wrong???:shrug:


#12

btw, I have a friend who consulted with a local judge about liability waivers. He said that liability waivers were worthless because you can’t sign your rights or your children’s rights away. If you are considered negligient (like allowing kids to swim without a lifeguard), you will be liable, waiver or not.

On the other hand, I would allow friends and neighbors to swim if a parent was present.


#13

[quote="MtnDwellar, post:11, topic:246218"]
This is very true. I bought a house that was owned by a family with several children. The other kids in the neighborhood were comfortable with diving from my pier whenever they desired.

I told the children that they shouldn't enter my property without my permission because my rottweilers might attack them.

Was that wrong???:shrug:

[/quote]

:eek::eek::eek: YES!!!!!

You now admited to having a vicious dog!!!!!:eek::eek::eek:

This is dog ownership 101. Warning people that your dogs could attack is like saying you have a loded gun and will shoot at random.

Please, PLEASE PLEASE! hire a lawyer before you say something else foolish.


#14

no I would not. We researched this in our state when we contemplating buying a home on a lake and no way. However you can’t stop people from going into the lake and swimming in front of your home, and you probably are not allowed to erect any barriers within so many feet. You need to find out the local law and consult your lawyer.


#15

Do NOT feel bad about this. My dad has been an insurance agent for 25 years and he could tell you story after story of clients who let neighbor kids climb their trees, swim in their pool, etc and how accidents happened. If a child gets hurt on your property, his parents have every right to sue you for everything you have. When I was a kid, we were only allowed to have kids my parents knew (and knew the kids’ parents) over.


#16

I wouldn’t let anyone I didn’t know swim at my house. Too much liability.


#17

[quote="purplesunshine, post:13, topic:246218"]

Please, PLEASE PLEASE! hire a lawyer before you say something else foolish.

[/quote]

Hire a lawyer!!!! :rotfl:


#18

Actually, becuase you verbally warned someone about your “vicious” dog your dog can automattically be put down if it bites someone…even if the bite is provoked.


#19

[quote="purplesunshine, post:18, topic:246218"]
Actually, becuase you verbally warned someone about your "vicious" dog your dog can automattically be put down if it bites someone...even if the bite is provoked.

[/quote]

I have raised several rotties. They all participated in community service and/or training competition and never showed any aggression toward a human. If one of them bit a person, with or without provocation, no one would have to tell me what to do.

I find the idea of hiring a lawyer for consultation prior to talking with my neighbors laughable. Sorry.


#20

[quote="MtnDwellar, post:19, topic:246218"]
I have raised several rotties. They all participated in community service and/or training competition and never showed any aggression toward a human. If one of them bit a person, with or without provocation, no one would have to tell me what to do.

I find the idea of hiring a lawyer for consultation prior to talking with my neighbors laughable. Sorry.

[/quote]

If you have a propensity to shoot of your mouth then yes, you need to talk with a lawyer.

And cops have the right to seize any known dog that bites when a warning was given, trained for service or not.


DISCLAIMER: The views and opinions expressed in these forums do not necessarily reflect those of Catholic Answers. For official apologetics resources please visit www.catholic.com.