Wrongful death suit says suicide followed IRS raid

A northern Indiana man has filed a lawsuit blaming the U.S. government for his wife’s suicide three days after Internal Revenue Service agents raided their home, saying she couldn’t go on living in fear of the agency’s trumped-up accusations.

“Being innocent is simply not enough for the government,” Denise Simon, a 50-year-old mother of six, wrote in a suicide note posted on a memorial Web site set up by her widower.

James Simon, 57, sued the government in February, accusing the government of intentional infliction of emotional distress, negligence in obtaining and executing a search warrant, trespass, invasion of privacy and wrongful death. His lawsuit seeks unspecified damages. A similar lawsuit was filed earlier against IRS agents involved in the raid.

Court documents say Denise Simon and the couple’s 10-year-old daughter were the only ones home when about 10 armed IRS agents in bulletproof vests raided the Simons’ Fort Wayne home at about 7 a.m. on Nov. 6, 2007.

foxnews.com/us/2010/04/13/wrongful-death-suit-says-suicide-followed-irs-raid/

In the court documents filed Tuesday, government attorneys denied the allegations and insisted the search warrant was valid. They said Denise Simon’s death was “voluntary and self-inflicted.”

Of course, that ignores the fact that if the IR-SS hadn’t smashed through the door with their jackboots and their battering rams, thus terrifying the poor woman out of her mind, she probably wouldn’t have been pushed over the edge and driven to suicide.

[quote="Wolseley, post:1, topic:194602"]
Of course, that ignores the fact that if the IR-SS hadn't **smashed through the door with their jackboots and their battering rams, **thus terrifying the poor woman out of her mind, she probably wouldn't have been pushed over the edge and driven to suicide.

[/quote]

Can you document that that is what they did, or are you just bloviating?

Paying one's taxes is part of living in a civilized society. When there is a problem with paying taxes on time, the IRS is usually very co-operative and helpful, and the interest and penalties imposed in such cases are moderate.

With people who try to jerk them around they are less patient. I suspect that that was the situation here.

[quote="beeliner, post:2, topic:194602"]
Can you document that that is what they did, or are you just bloviating?

[/quote]

The article states the agents were armed and in body armor. Usually you don't prepare that way if you're going over for cookies and a chat. I am familiar enough with armed police procedure to know that when you're geared up that way, you don't just knock on the door and ask "Hello, may we come in?"

[quote="beeliner, post:2, topic:194602"]
With people who try to jerk them around they are less patient. I suspect that that was the situation here.

[/quote]

I suspect otherwise.

"I am truly innocent of any attempt to evade taxes, launder money, commit fraud or any of the other things I am being accused of," Denise Simon wrote in another suicide note.

Of course, we used to have a thing called "innocent until proven guilty", but that's only reserved for terrorists now. Thanks, Barry.

I wonder how many lives of ordinary Americans the excesses of the Patriot Act has affected?

In comparison to the infringement on the privacy and freedoms of Americans that a new army of IRS will have, the Patriot Act, whatever its excesses were, is really just child's play.

To get in between a government and their entitlements is a dangerous thing indeed.

I’m not sure what this matter has to do with the Patriot Act which, whether you support it or not, is intended to combat international terrorism.

In any case, the IRS does not ‘trump up charges’ against taxpayers.

If you are a NON-taxpayer, then you are either destitute, or you may be doing something illegal, in which case the accused has the right to council and to contest the charges in court.

[quote="beeliner, post:5, topic:194602"]
I

'm not sure what this matter has to do with the Patriot Act which, whether you support it or not, is intended to combat international terrorism.

It is only being used as a comparison. Many people were so worried about the Patriot Act taking their freedoms away. I doubt that there were very many Americans at all even touched by that act in any way.
On the other hand, very few Americans will not be directly affected by a burgeoning army of IRS agents.

In any case, the IRS does not 'trump up charges' against taxpayers.

They do conduct raids on peoples houses.

If you are a NON-taxpayer, then you are either destitute, or you may be doing something illegal, in which case the accused has the right to council and to contest the charges in court.

[/quote]

As the IRS burgeons in numbers, Americans can expect that this will be the case.
People were worried about the Patriot Act scrutinizing their library borrowings. Maybe they should be more worried about having their every receipt scrutinized, and the raids of the IRS.

The same government that couldn't be trusted with the Patriot Act is the one conducting the raids looking for extra tax revenue.

[quote="Darryl1958, post:6, topic:194602"]
As the IRS burgeons in numbers, Americans can expect that this will be the case. .

[/quote]

Americans can expect that WHAT will be the case?

Darryl, I will be 70 years old this year. I have never in my life had the least problem with the IRS.

I don't know the full story of the case to which the opening poster referred, but I will check it out and report what I find back here. I have a good idea of what to expect, though. Tax dodgers or cheaters, pure and simple.

By the way, those accused of tax fraud are entitled to COUNSEL, not 'council' as I posted previously. As an English teacher I shoulda known better!

Not sure how anyone can blame the IRS agents. If she or
her family had paid their taxes, there wouldn’t have been a tax issue. If you don’t want to pay taxes, then you’re free to leave the country.

It’s a shame the woman didn’t seek help from a mental health professional when she was having thoughts of suicide.

And good luck trying to find one where the taxes are lower than here!

[quote="beeliner, post:7, topic:194602"]

Americans can expect that WHAT will be the case?

That the IRS will play an ever more present role in their lives.

Darryl, I will be 70 years old this year. I have never in my life had the least problem with the IRS.

My original intent in this thread was not to create paranoia on that account, but only to take note of how much more pervasive the IRS and the taxman are in the lives of the ordinary citizen than the Patriot Act ever would be.
I hope that having your house raided by 10 armed IRS agents would not be the typical experience of an American.

I don't know the full story of the case to which the opening poster referred, but I will check it out and report what I find back here. I have a good idea of what to expect, though. Tax dodgers or cheaters, pure and simple.

Even without references to jackboots and battering rams, and even if the family is shown to be not entirely innocent on the question of taxes, the very nature of the investigation ought to be reason for concern. Anything short of this family being Mafioso hiding evidence of payouts for hits would make the idea of 10 armed guards with body armor entering the home more than a little evasive and stressful.

Personally, if it was the Patriot Act disrupting a terrorist cell making a dirty bomb, this kind of story would be alright in my books. Extraordinary circumstances in times of war my warrant extraordinary methods.

However, because this kind of action is over taxes rather than dirty bombs, I find it all more than a little disturbing.

By the way, those accused of tax fraud are entitled to COUNSEL, not 'council' as I posted previously. As an English teacher I shoulda known better!

[/quote]

(...and I am glad that a teacher is properly using the word 'shoulda' rather than the 'should of' , or even worse 'should have' usages that so many of us n.ow resort to. Such proper usage of the word almost redeems you of the error of using 'council' instead of 'counsel')

Aaah yes, the IRS. What a wonderful institution. Obey, shut your mouth and comply and all will be just fine. Our tax collectors even carry weapons like the sheriff of Notingham. Guitly until proven innocent. I suggest anyone who finds this behavior acceptable watch the movie Freedom to Facism.

quote="Darryl1958, post:10, topic:194602"

[/quote]

I teach CONVERSATIONAL English as a second language, in Germany where the language is not frequently heard (all the American TV shows are dubbed into German), so I teach BOTH correct written English and the way the language is actually spoken in normal conversation.

Now, across the border in Holland, all the American TV series are broadcast in English, with Dutch subtitles. As a result, the Dutch speak American colloquial English almost better than Americans do!

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