Yale will rename a residential college honoring a 19th century vice president and ardent defender of slavery


#1

Yale will rename a residential college honoring a 19th century vice president and ardent defender of slavery cbsn.ws/2kxLj6t


#2

Good.

(I’ve grown tired of seeing his angry face on the cover of my AP US History textbook)


#3

For those who don’t know who he was, here is the beginning of the Wikipedia article on him:

John Caldwell Calhoun (/kælˈhuːn/; March 18, 1782 – March 31, 1850) was an American statesman and political theorist from South Carolina, and the seventh Vice President of the United States from 1825 to 1832. He is best remembered for being a strong defender of slavery and for advancing the concept of minority rights in politics, which he did in the context of defending Southern values from perceived Northern threats. He began his political career as a nationalist, modernizer, and proponent of a strong national government and protective tariffs. By the late 1820s, his views reversed and he became a leading proponent of states’ rights, limited government, nullification, and opposition to high tariffs—he saw Northern acceptance of these policies as the only way to keep the South in the Union. His beliefs and warnings heavily influenced the South’s secession from the Union in 1860–61.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_C._Calhoun


#4

I feel foolish…I thought the issue of slavery ended over 150 years ago. Who would have thought that it could still be a front-burner issue in today’s political climate?


#5

Really? People use it a grievance bludgeon to get “free” stuff all of the time.


#6

True. I still remember the constant mantra of “reparations” for slavery…I wonder why the SJWs let that one fall into disuse?


#7

I won’t argue with your feelings. But i wonder about your vision if you do not see the impacts that slavery have had in the US since the abolition.


#8

Since abolition? You mean, 152 years ago? All things have an impact. Jews have had negative impacts…the Irish have had negative impacts…the American Indian has had a negative impact…but why is it that we only hear about the impact of slavery? My ancestors were as poor as dirt but their descendants managed to do alright. Playing the perpetual victim card is never going to help someone move forward.


#9

My extended family managed to do all right too, even though we were serfs until the mid 1800’s. We might have gotten some blowback, in the US, about not fitting in with the privileged, but we did not go through lynching, or Jim Crow. We did not have governors standing on the steps of universities seeking to deny us entry. And we don’t have to deal with contemporaneous reminders that many look back to those days with nostalgia.

I think would agree with you with the treatment of some other groups. I hope that you realize that we have a long, long way to resolve the lingering issues that have followed our conquest of Native American lands.


#10

It’s merely a sign of goodwill, so I don’t see why you’re all complaining about how slavery is over.

It’s a residential college at one of the top universities in the nation, named after one of the most prominent anti-abolitionists.

Listen: Imagine you’re a Catholic student living in a college dorm named after a vice-president who absolutely despised all Catholics and thought of them as subservient to any other religious person. Sure, that man has been dead for over one hundred years, and that belief has long since disappeared in the vast majority of society. Would it be so wrong to advocate for a renaming of your college dorm to the name of a man or woman who has positively impacted the world more than he/she has negatively?


#11

Well, we don’t “only” hear about the impact of slavery. The plight of Native Americans is still very much on the front burner. Have you ever spent time on a reservation? I have – I spent several months on the Pine Ridge reservation, in South Dakota, working for the Indian Health Service. It was as close to hell on earth as I can imagine.

As to slavery – yes, the Irish faced discrimination when they came in large numbers to this country (my grandparents were from Ireland and were, of course, dirt poor when they arrived). That’s not even closed to the same as chattel slavery. The impact of slavery is far from over and done with.


#12

Name something after Henry Clay or Daniel Webster.


#13

Why?


#14

The election is over. Ethnic minority issues are now a low priority for the far left as there is no need to turn them out to defeat “evil” republicans at the ballot box. :thumbsup:


#15

So if this is such a horrible injustice :bighanky: that hurts everyone’s feelings-----why is it just being noticed now?

Is it for the cause of righteousness to blaze across the Milky Way for all time…or is it because we are so terribly bored and decadent that we now have to rename and remake everything to prevent a hurt, sad (probably false) feeling?

Listen: Imagine you’re a Catholic student living in a college dorm named after a vice-president who absolutely despised all Catholics and thought of them as subservient to any other religious person. Sure, that man has been dead for over one hundred years, and that belief has long since disappeared in the vast majority of society. Would it be so wrong to advocate for a renaming of your college dorm to the name of a man or woman who has positively impacted the world more than he/she has negatively?

One name:

Che Guevara

Why is he on the shirts of many American college students over the years? The man got a thrill from killing, thought Blacks were inferior and didn’t like rock and roll.

So is that important, or is this just about picking and choosing whatever villains the far liberal left doesn’t like and thinks it gets to decide what goes and what stays.


#16

What’s the big deal then? The only people getting worked up about this are the same ones from the generation that did not want to share a water fountain with African Americans and get mad when people say “Happy Holidays” instead of merry christmas. lol

Change like this is only hurting the feelings of the people that nostalgically look back to the “good ole days” of segregation.


#17

Who’s feelings are really being hurt but the people that nostalgically look back to the “good ole days” of segregation?


#18

Honestly, I wouldn’t care. It’s a name. :shrug:


#19

I don’t understand why they don’t name it after Barack Hussein Obama. Is it because he’s black?:confused:


#20

I would strongly recommend reading up on the continuation of slavery in various forms up to the present day. A great place to start would be Douglas Blackmon’s book Slavery by Another Name.


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