Yes, it is OK to watch Beauty Pageants

I want to open up this topic and let people expand it because recently another post gave a scathing critique of beauty pageants as if they were destroying womanhood, promoting sexism, ruining women's health and that somehow these women were forced against their will to participate in this paternalistic corruption.

That is one opinion, but I don't see any possible way to concur with her assertion that one is not a good Catholic to watch a beauty pageant. It's only fair to clear this up. Clearly she has issues around feminism that colored her response, which was not apropos of the question.

She seemed to miss the point - could this be a SIN of concupiscence? There's no other way it could be a sin. An apologist must be careful to separate her personal opinions from Church doctrine. Just because we don't like the concept of beauty pageants does not mean "any Catholic" should feel the same way.

If a man or woman, in my opinion, enjoys the innocent excitement of women in pretty gowns, costumes and bathing suits, the way we enjoy much of God's beautiful creation, there is certainly no sin.

If we are watching with a lustful attitude, with the intent of physical or mental arousal, that surely is sinful. But I have never in my life seen anyone react to a simple beauty pageant as if it's a striptease act or something. Let's not be total prudes. These women are pretty and glamorous and it's fun to watch them, that's all. Women in most TV shows or movies display much more and are much more provocative.

As for the ladies having to possibly ruin their health by wearing heels, well, most young ladies do wear heels and somehow survive. Anything they do for the contest is because they want to. The are lucky to be pretty and talented and they are participating eagerly in a show that will bring the winners untold opportunities in scholarships, trips and social interaction. There is nothing degrading in that, as was implied.

So, the participants are not wrong, this is a free country and one can be a pageant contestant no matter how low someone else judges it to be. The observers have a pleasant time seeing lovely and feminine women who are a fine example compared to the trash on much of TV or the internet today. Their elegance and poise is something I would not hesitate for my sons or daughters to see.

I asked my priest what he thought, and he laughed out loud at the idea that a beauty pageant could be sinful to watch. Father did say, "as with any thing involving women, if a man is prone to lustful fantasies or over stimulation, he should not give in to those desires. However, that would not be the case for most normal men with a beauty pageant such as the Miss America type."

[quote="Margie9, post:1, topic:256464"]
I want to open up this topic and let people expand it because recently another post gave a scathing critique of beauty pageants as if they were destroying womanhood, promoting sexism, ruining women's health and that somehow these women were forced against their will to participate in this paternalistic corruption.

That is one opinion, but I don't see any possible way to concur with her assertion that one is not a good Catholic to watch a beauty pageant. It's only fair to clear this up. Clearly she has issues around feminism that colored her response, which was not apropos of the question.

She seemed to miss the point - could this be a SIN of concupiscence? There's no other way it could be a sin. An apologist must be careful to separate her personal opinions from Church doctrine. Just because we don't like the concept of beauty pageants does not mean "any Catholic" should feel the same way.

If a man or woman, in my opinion, enjoys the innocent excitement of women in pretty gowns, costumes and bathing suits, the way we enjoy much of God's beautiful creation, there is certainly no sin.

If we are watching with a lustful attitude, with the intent of physical or mental arousal, that surely is sinful. But I have never in my life seen anyone react to a simple beauty pageant as if it's a striptease act or something. Let's not be total prudes. These women are pretty and glamorous and it's fun to watch them, that's all. Women in most TV shows or movies display much more and are much more provocative.

As for the ladies having to possibly ruin their health by wearing heels, well, most young ladies do wear heels and somehow survive. Anything they do for the contest is because they want to. The are lucky to be pretty and talented and they are participating eagerly in a show that will bring the winners untold opportunities in scholarships, trips and social interaction. There is nothing degrading in that, as was implied.

So, the participants are not wrong, this is a free country and one can be a pageant contestant no matter how low someone else judges it to be. The observers have a pleasant time seeing lovely and feminine women who are a fine example compared to the trash on much of TV or the internet today. Their elegance and poise is something I would not hesitate for my sons or daughters to see.

I asked my priest what he thought, and he laughed out loud at the idea that a beauty pageant could be sinful to watch. Father did say, "as with any thing involving women, if a man is prone to lustful fantasies or over stimulation, he should not give in to those desires. However, that would not be the case for most normal men with a beauty pageant such as the Miss America type."

[/quote]

Due to today's civilization, it would be dangerous to even watch Beauty Pageants. I assume it's okay if the pageant shows modest attires and doesn't promote lasciviousness.

I don't really like beauty pageants, but I certainly don't think watching them is a sin. I mean, the women aren't stripping their clothes off, they're wearing evening gowns and bathing suits. Yes, if someone was watching them with a lustful attitude, that would be wrong, but let's face it, if someone wants to satisfy lustful desires, they will probably watch pornography these days, because it is so readily available and easy to obtain. (Not saying that's a good thing, of course, but it's true).

I have watched them in the past, and it is interesting to see all of the women from so many different countries (in the universe pageant or whatever). Not something I watch regularly though, in fact I haven't seen one in several years. I don't have TV anymore anyway.

Basically, it’s just a scholarship competition, but contestants and winners sometimes get some networking advantages in the theater and film world, if that’s the career path they’re pursuing. However, what you see on TV is the result of a lot of “feeder” pageants, and some of these women have been in the pageant world since very early childhood. That means stage mothers, some of whom push young children long past the kid’s own interest and endurance. My big concern with pageants is that, unlike activities which develop specific skills or talents, the primary focus is on appearance and fashion. Sure, some of these young women actually have talent, but I am willing to bet that young people who are serious about pursuing acting are probably pursuing a degree in theater at an accredited college or university, are auditioning for parts in community theaters or as extras in film production, and so forth, rather than going the pageant route.

Perhaps the images of that poor five year old child who was murdered stick in my mind, but there is just something creepy about a four year old made up to look like a miniature adult. The pageant world encourages this, in fact, you pretty much can’t advance in them unless you go through such things. At the national or international level, when you have experienced young women who are aware of the issues involved, there’s probably nothing wrong with them. It’s the local events with young children that bother me a little.

It's wrong for me to watch them for the same reason that it's wrong for me to watch "Dancing with the Stars," or reruns of "Baywatch."

My wife likes to watch them, and other than being a waste of time, I don't consider that it would be a sin for her to do so. I always go "Mo-o-o-o" if I walk thru the room when she's watching one, because in my mind beauty pageants = cattle shows.

[quote="Margie9, post:1, topic:256464"]
I want to open up this topic and let people expand it because recently another post gave a scathing critique of beauty pageants as if they were destroying womanhood, promoting sexism, ruining women's health and that somehow these women were forced against their will to participate in this paternalistic corruption.

That is one opinion, but I don't see any possible way to concur with her assertion that one is not a good Catholic to watch a beauty pageant. It's only fair to clear this up. Clearly she has issues around feminism that colored her response, which was not apropos of the question.

She seemed to miss the point - could this be a SIN of concupiscence? There's no other way it could be a sin. An apologist must be careful to separate her personal opinions from Church doctrine. Just because we don't like the concept of beauty pageants does not mean "any Catholic" should feel the same way.

If a man or woman, in my opinion, enjoys the innocent excitement of women in pretty gowns, costumes and bathing suits, the way we enjoy much of God's beautiful creation, there is certainly no sin.

If we are watching with a lustful attitude, with the intent of physical or mental arousal, that surely is sinful. But I have never in my life seen anyone react to a simple beauty pageant as if it's a striptease act or something. Let's not be total prudes. These women are pretty and glamorous and it's fun to watch them, that's all. Women in most TV shows or movies display much more and are much more provocative.

As for the ladies having to possibly ruin their health by wearing heels, well, most young ladies do wear heels and somehow survive. Anything they do for the contest is because they want to. The are lucky to be pretty and talented and they are participating eagerly in a show that will bring the winners untold opportunities in scholarships, trips and social interaction. There is nothing degrading in that, as was implied.

So, the participants are not wrong, this is a free country and one can be a pageant contestant no matter how low someone else judges it to be. The observers have a pleasant time seeing lovely and feminine women who are a fine example compared to the trash on much of TV or the internet today. Their elegance and poise is something I would not hesitate for my sons or daughters to see.

I asked my priest what he thought, and he laughed out loud at the idea that a beauty pageant could be sinful to watch. Father did say, "as with any thing involving women, if a man is prone to lustful fantasies or over stimulation, he should not give in to those desires. However, that would not be the case for most normal men with a beauty pageant such as the Miss America type."

[/quote]

Thank you for posting this!

I have had a bad taste in my mouth for several days since that post blasting beauty pageants was posted. I think it went way too far. Beauty pageants have been around for decades, and for the majority of Americans, they are innocent, wholesome, and fun. I can remember my parents and grandparents watching beauty pageants, and how excited we all were when one of our local gals won Miss America one year.

Many of those women are very intelligent women who have earned or are in the process of earning advanced college degrees. If they choose, of their own free will, to attempt to earn money to pay for their school, business, or other expenses by entering a pageant that judges not only their beauty, but their fitness level, intelligence, and community involvement, then that is just fine.

My daughter did pageants for a few years while she was a teenager. She LOVED her pageant experiences! She had so much fun, and learned a lot about interview skills. She never once felt uncomfortable or exploited.

Also, in the end it isn’t based on appearance. It’s always a final question that decides who finally wins.

[quote="SamTheNewfie, post:7, topic:256464"]
Also, in the end it isn't based on appearance. It's always a final question that decides who finally wins.

[/quote]

And the answer is always "World peace", right? ;)

Sinful to watch? Perhaps not. Wasting my time watching garbage that promotes an awful superficial image of women and their bodies (like the Miss Universe show), an absolute YES. I don't need to send the message to my daughter that looks are more important than brains and that's exactly what I would be doing if we watched these types of shows in our house. Girls have enough problems with body images in the media as it is, I don't need to contribute to the garbage by watching beauty pageants.

[quote="Cat, post:6, topic:256464"]
Thank you for posting this!

I have had a bad taste in my mouth for several days since that post blasting beauty pageants was posted. I think it went way too far. Beauty pageants have been around for decades, and for the majority of Americans, they are innocent, wholesome, and fun. I can remember my parents and grandparents watching beauty pageants, and how excited we all were when one of our local gals won Miss America one year.

Many of those women are very intelligent women who have earned or are in the process of earning advanced college degrees. If they choose, of their own free will, to attempt to earn money to pay for their school, business, or other expenses by entering a pageant that judges not only their beauty, but their fitness level, intelligence, and community involvement, then that is just fine.

[/quote]

What CAT said. :thumbsup:

~Liza

Here's the original post the OP was referring to, if anyone missed it:

Is it wrong to watch beauty pageants?

[quote="Joe_5859, post:11, topic:256464"]
Here's the original post the OP was referring to, if anyone missed it:

Is it wrong to watch beauty pageants?

[/quote]

Thanks for the link back to the original post. I think Michelle Arnold offered an excellent response to the question.

What I took from Michelle’s reply was that beauty pageants promote vanity and that any Catholic supporting them would be responsible for doing the same which is why she would be surprised if there were Catholics that approved of them.

van·i·ty
/ˈvænɪti/ Show Spelled [van-i-tee]
adjective
noun

  1. excessive pride in one’s appearance, qualities, abilities, achievements, etc.; character or quality of being vain; conceit: Failure to be elected was a great blow to his vanity.
  2. an instance or display of this quality or feeling.
  3. something about which one is vain.
  4. lack of real value; hollowness; worthlessness: the vanity of a selfish life.
  5. something worthless, trivial, or pointless.

1 & 5 really do hit the nail on the head when describing beauty pagents.

I am an 18 year old Roman Catholic, considering being a nun. I am also a Pageant Queen. I won my local city’s pageant last May. Just to clear some things up with some of you, saying that girls in pageants are not good girls, that we are all promiscuous, and focused solely on beauty have no idea what the first thing is about pageants. (Also, not a very Christ like thing to say by the way) (eph4:29)
So here are some things I got from entering this pageant:

  1. Entering my city’s pageant actually helped my faith developed. This year I have grown so much in my faith. I have never had such a great relationship with God.
  2. NOT ALL PAGEANTS HAVE A BATHING SUIT CONTEST. In fact, I won’t enter a pageant if it does, not because it’s a sin or whatever, but because I’m very modest.
  3. Entering a pageant requires a LOT of talent. You have to be poised, intelligent, witty, courageous, and strong in faith, body and mind, you have to have confidence; you have to be able to answer tough questions quickly and intelligently. You have to be able to walk and carry yourself with poise and grace, this “shows your understanding that God made you perfect just the way you are.”-My pageant director.
  4. You also must have a great deal of patience. Most especially to not snap at all the people who hold you as disgusting for in their eyes you are “giving into the media” and portraying ourself as one solely concerned with appearance.
  5. I have become very skilled at interacting with all sorts of people. This has most affected my ability to evangelize and communicate with those of other beliefs.
  6. You must be able to turn the other cheek. I have had people tell me I am going to hell because I did a pageant. I have had people tell me that I “should be excommunicated”. I have cried my eyes out to many a priest in confessionals for allowing such comments to affect my self esteem. It is not easy to smile and say “I disagree but thank you for sharing with Me.” to those who feel the need to belittle your importance. This is NOT a Christian thing to do.
  7. I thank God everyday for my crown and this amazing opportunity to represent my city. It has taught me so very much. I have learned how to carry my self in such a way that is professional, modest, confident and “saint-like”(according to my priest). I have actually become a much more modest individual because of the strict dress code I must adhere to at events, I now look back at my past attire and I am ashamed of it. I have also (as previously stated) started seriously considering the religious life. In times of great stress, when all I wanted to do was take off my heels and throw them at the judgmental ‘Christians’ staring me down and telling me I was practically worthless in the eyes of God; I learned to smile and thank God for them, and offer up my pain to him. I have truly learned my self worth in Christ. I AM BEAUTIFUL just the way I am. As Mary said “I am the handmade of the lord, let it be done unto me according to your word” I say before every event. I lead an all girls bible study at my school, and many of the topics we talk about are beauty, and the media and how women are viewed in society. I emphasize the point that we are a treasure in the eyes of God, that all life is and that it is beautiful, that we are beautiful just the way we are, that Nothing we can say or do will ever make God love us less, and that we need not worry about the acceptance of others if we are accepted by Christ.
  8. Not all pageant girls, are ditzy, not all pageant girls are sluts, are trained from early childhood to be “miniature adults”, are “fake” are concerned with “appearance and fashion”. I am living proof! AND IM CATHOLIC!
    Pageants are scholarship programs designed to help transform girls into young women. Please stop spreading that pageants are destructive, because honestly, winning this pageant was one of God’s greatest gifts to me, because it drew me closer to him, and made me realize that he made more beautiful than I could ever try to make myself.

So to answer your question, no, it is not wrong to watch a pageant. And to those who think it is; is it a sin to want to pay for my education? Is it a sin to give God the glory for this beautiful creation known as me? Is it wrong to find your worth in Christ? If so, then excommunicate me. Nothing you can do will ever excommunicate me from the love of God, for I am his hand made and I trust in him.

thanks for reading!
<3 Caitlin
Phil 4:13

I don’t understand this topic. You postulate a hypothesis, one which, as far as I can tell, you made up yourself, and then you refute it. I’m not sure anyone ever said that you couldn’t watch beauty pageants, yet for some reason, this was a good topic for you to express your opinion, with the sole intention, it would seem, to start a fight.

Well done.

If you had read the whole thread, you would have seen post #11, which links to the AAA forum, and the original Q&A on the subject.

At one time, the general social climate regarding beautiful women was different. I was taught to open doors for women, to treat them respectfully, and if I dated, there were limits. Beauty was clothed in modesty and decency. Today - mostly not.

The radical feminists didn’t want to be called ladies - they were women. They didn’t want men bringing them flowers or sending them cards expressing affection and they certainly didn’t want men opening doors for them. My last girlfriend was poised, walked like she had a book on her head and was very feminine, and fun to be with. We were taught to get to know the whole person, not just her outward appearance.

In the 1980s, I became friendly with a young lady who entered beauty pageants. This is what she told me then about two piece bathing suits and bikinis: “They look like underwear. I don’t want people seeing me in my underwear.” The one-piece bathing suit and high heels were appropriate. Most women wore high heels at the time, at least when they went out.

Today - there is such a distorted view of women that I would caution Christians about watching beauty pageants. When women were respectfully admired for their beauty, and as persons, it was OK. There is just too much disrespect for women today. Too much constant, 24/7 talk and visuals about sex, that I would ask all potential viewers to be cautious.

Speaking generally, and not to any poster here: "‘This is a free country’ was what I heard a lot from the Hippies and radicals right after they started living with their girlfriends and fornication was called ‘natural acts.’ No one was going to tell them what was right and wrong.

Peace,
Ed

I always try to stay away from Occasion of SIN ! Some don’t know the Danger of a Mortal SIN and where it leads if we die that day ! Better look a Nature Channel ! I won’t recommend to watch ! Most Mass Medias are Evil ! They will promote anything for MONEY. Stay close to God. Don’t waste time ! :slight_smile:


Many think today’s fashions are “no big deal”? Think that following the dress of the crowd is okay? Think again! Many (most?) popular fashions today are offensive to God, sinful, scandalous, occasions of sin, enticements to sin, and display a lack of regard for the body as “a temple of the Holy Spirit”.

Our Lady of Fatima told us that “Certain fashions will be introduced that will offend Our Lord very much.” She added that “More souls go to Hell because of sins of the flesh than for any other reason.”

“You carry your snare everywhere and spread your net in all places. You allege that you never invited others to sin. You did not, indeed, by your words, but you have done so by your dress and your deportment, and much more effectively than you could by your voice. When you have made another sin in his heart, how can you be innocent? Tell me whom does this world condemn? Whom do judges in court punish? Those who drink poison or those who prepare it and administer the fatal potion? You have prepared the abominable cup, you have given the death-dealing drink and you are more criminal than those who poison the body; you murder not the body but the soul. And it is not to enemies you do this, nor are you urged on by any imaginary necessity, nor provoked by injury, but out of foolish vanity and pride.” (St. John Chrysostom, Doctor of the Church)

“[A] dress cannot be called decent which is cut deeper than two fingers breadth under the pit of the throat, which does not cover the arms at least to the elbows, and scarcely reaches a bit beyond the knees. Furthermore, dresses of transparent material are improper” [Sacred Congregation of the Council (under Pope Pius XI), January 12, 1930]

Why pants “female” modesty hurt?

To conclude, we must bear in mind that the fashions of the world can not be models for your clothing, but the Virgin Mary and the Saints. Complementing: clothing that makes us more like the Virgin Mary our Mother? The pants is that they are not! Mary in her apparitions always appears with dresses, showing that they obviously are modest. Always remember a follower of the blog you sent us a comment about your first day in the Church of skirts, and she said “I never went in there feeling so much like Mary.” I think that is what we feel as we moved all our wardrobes!

Read more:
floresdamodestia.blogspot.com/2013/01/por-que-as-calcas-femininas-ferem.html [Tranlate]
www.mycatholicsource.com/mcs/pc/catholic_life/modesty_dress.htm


Why am I here ? :eek:
www.catholicbible101.com/thegoaloflife.htm
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