#YesAllWomen Campaign Gains Steam on Social Media

Re: the bolded - Kind of like when we reply to a thread in Prayer Intentions but don’t do anything else. Sorry (no sarcasm), but to non-believers it probably looks rather similar.

As a man I an vocal that no man should wear spandex trunks.I might start a social media campaign on that

Rock music before and let’s make sure we mean “some” artists, not all and some rap music performers now, may sing songs with a misogynist tone. I totally agree with protesting this form of music.

Former Radio 1 ladette Sara Cox has blasted modern media for being too crude, branding Channel 4 programme Come Dine With Me ‘raunchy’ and rap music ‘sexist.’

The 39-year-old mother of three, known for her days of hard partying in the 1990s has criticised US rapper Pitbull saying his sexist lyrics ‘make her soul weep.’

She said: ‘Someone like [rapper] Pitbull on Radio 1 makes my soul weep with the way he sings about women - I just couldn’t bear playing that.’

dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2640386/Sara-Cox-slams-Radio-1-playing-sexist-rap-music.html

Originally saw the story elsewhere for those who don’t like the DM but found it in a news search.

Related:

Should offensive rap music be banned from locker rooms?

bbc.com/news/blogs-echochambers-27383952

MOST men, and almost certainly if over the age of 30, obese, excessively hirsute, etc.:slight_smile: It’s not so much a modesty issue as an aesthetic one.:slight_smile:

:thumbsup:

And also, because the ones who do not fit into that category are distracting, they should wear shirts with sleeves (no tank tops) and necklines that are no lower than two finger widths below their collar bone. :wink:

And should never wear black patent leather shoes

I think you and I both know that females and males have different anatomy- we are different. But the main issue that #YesAllWomen addresses is school dress codes, which in my opinion (as a current high school senior) are VERY necessary.

Not only should the shirt be no more than two finger widths below their collar bone, it must also be long enough to cover the underwear that is very likely sticking out of the tops of their pants (or in the case of some…their belly).

Regardless, shirt or no shirt, some men are just distracting. :wink:

Yes, unfortunately. While I agree with the larger gist of the campaign, that women should be able to walk wherever they like and wear whatever they please without fear, I don’t agree with the free contraception and abortion on demand that so many feminist find necessary for their ends. When there is a campaign that doesn’t go against the basics of my religion I will go along with it.

And it seems we are forgetting that 4 of the 6 victims that Rodger’s claimed were men. The much larger problem, that affects both men and women, that the campaign ignores is access to guns and mental health. Until America is willing to address that problem I don’t see what much else can be done. Until that happens, we will just have to accept that there will be mass shooting about every six months or so.

Perhaps all people should see this excellent video:

trueactivist.com/this-is-what-happens-when-the-public-sees-a-woman-abusing-a-man/

Mass killings happen at least monthly (not all are shootings). Most never make the national news.

I stand corrected. Most people believe the freedom of owning guns is worth a monthly mass shooting. I can’t change that. The only thing I can do is get out of eh Dodge so to speak; I’ve been working on my visa to work in Canada or Norway, whoever will have me.

The point of the hashtag isn’t to say that all men are bad, or that all men are violent, or that all men make women feel unsafe, or that all men anything.

It’s just pointing out that ALL women have had this kind of experience.

Every single woman out there has a story like this. A story of feeling unsafe, or having to deal with unwelcomed sexual advances, or needing to be extra aware of their surroundings or the silly things we’ve been taught or learned along the way to try to stay safe. It’s not all men that do the things that lead to this, but all women have to deal with the consequences on a regular basis.

No, not ALL women have this kind of experience. Some of us weren’t raised to be wilting flowers.

AGREE completely about the mental health aspect of this, and that our country has a lot of ground to make up on that front, both to help people and to prevent tragedies like this.

From the small amount of the (extremely chilling) manifesto I read of his, he seemed to be extremely angry at both the women who turned him down (which evolved into loathing for all women in general) as well as the men that they chose to be with instead of him - all seemed to be revolving around the rejection he faced. My interpretation of his thought process was that he was a fantastic person and therefore deserved to be popular and deserved to have a girlfriend and enjoy the company of beautiful women (seemed to view them as objects more than people, and as it continued, this became more and more the case), and anyone who stood in the way of that - whether it be pretty girls who turned him down, or the guys that those girls preferred to be with - deserved to die.

I don’t see the fact that he also killed men as a sign that this killing spree wasn’t related to how he viewed women.

Not that that doesn’t mean it’s still important for society and our country to keep talking about mental health and access to guns as well. All important pieces of the puzzle.

I mean it is sort of hot out… :shrug:

In all seriousness though, “all” is not be accurate, as absolutes rarely are, and thank you for pointing that out.

However, I think it is fair to say that the vast majority of women over a certain age have encountered a time where they had to deal with unwanted advancements from someone who was a little too pushy or had a nervous “what if” in the back of their mind. How you deal with that is one thing, I’m not saying that all/most women get sweaty palms and paranoid while walking with keys between their knuckles and pepper spray in their hands when walking from a parking lot into a building, but that doesn’t mean that there isn’t the experience.

Getting scared while walking alone at night is proof that you are a victim of misogyny? REALLY? Getting scared in a situation like that is just common sense. People can hurt people, especially in the dark. It’ll happen no matter how far and wide the hashtag spreads. I find it incredibly inane, anyway, that people are using the DEATHS of people (mostly men) as an excuse to complain about what are, most of the time, minor inconveniences.

Sorry, I never seem to be able to sympathize with feminism, and I’m a 17 year old girl. It always seems to write up all sorts of indictments against men and then completely excuse women from any and all wrongdoing (Don’t even get me started on the complete silliness and self-centeredness of the “I can wear whatever I want without consequence!” attitude.) All PEOPLE are morally responsible, we should treat EACH OTHER with respect. Feminism is too narrow of a moral system (and often a very dubious one at that, given what it often advocates). All it seems to do is turn it into some “us vs. them” war between the sexes.

:shrug:

Being scared to walk alone at night isn’t really what it’s all about - forgive me if I picked a bad example that oversimplified things.

I talked to a couple of my male friends about the tag, and they had both spent some time reading the tweets, and were surprised by the content of many of them, but seemed more surprised by my lack of surprise (can someone please get me a thesaurus?) (This might explain bettter: (or maybe not, it’s hard to say) slate.com/articles/double_x/doublex/2014/05/_yesallwomen_in_the_wake_of_elliot_rodger_why_it_s_so_hard_for_men_to_recognize.html)

I don’t see myself as a victim, even if I can identify with some of the tweets I’ve read. I think it’s sad that after reading some, my first thought was “oh my goodness, yes! I’ve been in that situation before too, and didn’t think anything of it!”

I don’t see this whole thing as a specific movement with a goal in mind, or a way to whine about common inconveniences that are dealt with and not usually any big issue. I see it more as part of a larger conversation. The sheer number of tweets with this hashtag show that many people have things to say about the topic, and if this is a way to get some of those thoughts out there, and start a conversation or contribute to a conversation, then I don’t see how it’s a bad thing.

:rotfl:

In all seriousness though, “all” is not be accurate, as absolutes rarely are, and thank you for pointing that out.

However, I think it is fair to say that the vast majority of women over a certain age have encountered a time where they had to deal with unwanted advancements from someone who was a little too pushy or had a nervous “what if” in the back of their mind. How you deal with that is one thing, I’m not saying that all/most women get sweaty palms and paranoid while walking with keys between their knuckles and pepper spray in their hands when walking from a parking lot into a building, but that doesn’t mean that there isn’t the experience.

I know women who have been attacked, raped, you name it and it is horrible when things like that happen. It should never happen to women OR men. But, it doesn’t help anything to make exaggerated claims or pit one side against another. Acting like it’s only men who are aggressors is ridiculous. Some of the scariest people I’ve ever dealt with were women. They can go from sweetheart to demon in zero to three seconds.

Your post- "How so? You don’t see many of the tweets as stereotyping men? I do.

" @efeign: Because men consistently tell me I should be “flattered” by any and all advances made by them. #yesallwomen"

@kakekinsella: women should not have to follow a certain dress code because it may “distract the men” why not teach the men to respect. #YesAllWomen

^ Just pulled these off twitter. Do they not hint at stereotyping all men?"

Notice how one of the tweets you pulled off twitter to support your argument that these tweets just stereotype men concerns what women wear? Notice how you haven’t bothered to actually address the fact almost every thread on this forum dealing with modesty is dealing with what women wear and the impact of what they wear on men?

forums.catholic.com/showthread.php?t=882734
“This woman at my Parish comes walking in all the time for Mass, wearing the tightest fitting dress, with the lowest cleavage, not to mention she is built super fine with big breasts. I mean I’m trying to keep my chastity in check, and this married woman it seems to me is trying to seduce me, the virgins, other married men, and the priest. I’ve seen at least 3 Acolytes walk into walls because of her, saw a Deacon trip over his own feet because of her, so I know it’s not just me noticing her.”

Yeah, men blaming women for their lustful thoughts is just one of those “we hate men” stereotypes.:rolleyes:

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