Yet another question...or two


#1

Sorry but…

  1. If one goes to Mass and is in the state of mortal sin, does not receive the Euchorest, is it a sin to wait for the blessing? Or take Holy Water? I was just thinking about it the other day

  2. CAn venial sins be forgiven if one makes a perfect act of contrition?

  3. After the Body of Christ leaves the host at dijuestion, does the host return to bread and whine…


#2

[quote=Emly]1. If one goes to Mass and is in the state of mortal sin, does not receive the Euchorest, is it a sin to wait for the blessing? Or take Holy Water?
[/quote]

No.

[quote=Emly]2. CAn venial sins be forgiven if one makes a perfect act of contrition?
[/quote]

Venial sins are forgiven if one makes a true act of contrition. Even mortal sins are forgiven if one makes a perfect act of contrition. However, it is almost impossible for most of us to make a perfect act of contrition – which is why sacramental confession is strongly recommended.

[quote=Emly]3. After the Body of Christ leaves the host at dijuestion, does the host return to bread and whine…
[/quote]

I don’t understand the question.


#3

Plesae note that perfevt contrition does not mean saying one of those prayers. This is only an act of contrition. Perfect contrition is something that happens in the heart and soul. This is a major, and dangerous, misunderstanding that a lot of people have these days for some reason.

Also, sacramental confession is not recommended, it is required even for those whom have perfect contrition unless they are completely unable to go. Even in this case, the Eucharist must not be received until Sacramental confession occurs unless grave danger of death exists.


#4

.

If one goes to Mass and is in the state of mortal sin, does not receive the Euchorest, is it a sin to wait for the blessing? Or take Holy Water? I was just thinking about it the other day

First, if one is at Mass in a state of mortal sin, one definitely does NOT receive the Eucharist. One can certainly go to Mass since missing Mass would be ANOTHER mortal sin.

Second, what do you mean by “the blessing”? Going up in line to as if to receive but getting “blessed” instead? This is a relatively new phenomenon.

Third, Holy Water is a sacramental, not a sacrament. One can take Holy Water whether one is in a state of grace or not; just as one can pray one’s rosary, wear a scapular or crucifix, or read a holy card whether one is in mortal sin or not.

CAn venial sins be forgiven if one makes a perfect act of contrition?

As has been pointed out, a “perfect act of contrition” is more than just reciting the prayer. Venial sins (since you are at Mass) are forgiven at the Confiteor (I confess), or indeed as noted by a regular act of contrition. It is a good idea to confess venial sins to a priest if they are quite regular–IOW, if you ALWAYS seem to be getting angry with poor drivers every time you drive, that particular sin, venial as it is, could (unchecked) lead to road rage, etc.

  1. After the Body of Christ leaves the host at dijuestion, does the host return to bread and whine…
    \

What you mean, I think, is “since a person begins to digest food–breaking it down–about 15 minutes or so after he eats it, what happens to the Person of Christ then”–right?

Jesus Christ, Body and Blood, Soul and Divinity, remains in us PHYSICALLY for those first 15 minutes, under the appearance of bread, wine, or both. With the onset of digestion, the PHYSICAL presence of Christ ceases but the SPIRITUAL presence of Him WITHIN US will remain as long as we are in a state of grace.

Does that help?


#5

Perfect contrition is sorrow for our sins solely based on having offended God, because we have separated ourselves from Him through our actions. True contrition is sorrow for our sins resulting in a fear of God’s punishment and the temporal consequences of our transgressions in addition to having offended God. For most of us, our contrition can be considered true but it is almost impossible for our contrition to be perfect because we can not completely rule out our fear of God’s punishment completely from the picture as to our reason for being sorry.

However, if we were to have perfect contrition than our mortal sins would be forgiven at that moment if we had a firm resolution to receive sacramental confession as soon as possible (see CCC 1452).

[quote=Lazerlike42]the Eucharist must not be received until Sacramental confession occurs
[/quote]

If the sin is forgiven with perfect contrition, why could the Eucharist not be received?

Personally speaking, I can’t see myself ever having perfect contrition, or even if I did, I would still have doubt about it being perfect contrition and would still seek sacramental confession before receiving the Eucharist but speaking in theory, if mortal sins are forgiven with perfect contrition, why could the Eucharist not be received prior to sacramental confession since the person is already free of mortal sin (having it removed via perfect contrition)?


#6

[quote=Sir Knight]…speaking in theory, if mortal sins are forgiven with perfect contrition, why could the Eucharist not be received prior to sacramental confession since the person is already free of mortal sin (having it removed via perfect contrition)?
[/quote]

It’s my understanding that Sacramental Confession is required - even if the penitent is already freed from the guilt of mortal sin by way of perfect contrition:

  1. by reason that it is a discipline of the Church that such is to be done as a way of “examining oneself” before returning to the Eucharist - in line with St Paul’s admonition in 1Cor 11:27-8

Therefore, whoever eats the bread or drinks the cup of the Lord in an unworthy manner will be guilty of sinning against the body and blood of the Lord. A man ought to examine himself before he eats of the bread and drinks of the cup.

Every mortal sin is to be confessed to a priest (who acts as an official representative of God’s People, the Church) before returning to the Eucharist. We are to “examine ourselves” but in an “accountable manner” (ie., before a priest) since it is human nature - when left to our own judgements - to rationalize our sinfulness and the harm it does.

When we sin mortally we break union with both God but we also do harm and break union with God’s People. Perfect Contrition restores us to union with God but we must still be reconciled with His People, the Church. The reception of Sacramental Confession thus serves the social pupose of making amends and being reconciled to the Body of Christ for the harm done by the person who committed a mortal sin.

and 2) by reason that perfect contrition - when it is present in a person - encompasses an inner dispostition of the will to receive Sacramental Confession as an outward expression of our internal resolve. In other words, if we say we have perfect contrition but don’t have a desire nor the will to receive Sacramental Confession then our contrition is not “perfect”.

Hope this helps

Keep the Faith
jmt


#7

[quote=Emly]Sorry but…
3. After the Body of Christ leaves the host at dijuestion, does the host return to bread and whine…
[/quote]

To clarify the term ‘host’ is used to describe the bread that will become the body of Christ.

From my understanding the the real presence remains so long as it appears like bread and wine.

When we eat the flesh and drink the blood we consume Jesus. When we normally eat something it then becomes part of us. In a similar way when we eat Christ he becomes a part of us, but we also become part of him, part of his body. After we eat this Divinity, it is us who are holy.


closed #8

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