Your Learning Disabilities


#1

Hello, :D

I have mild/moderate ADHD and Dyslexia. I take a stimulant medicine for the ADHD and I had therapy as a child for the Dyslexia. I still have some lingering Dylsexia issues with comprehension, retention, retrieval and memory. The ADHD tends to show up in issues with attention, concentration, hyperactivity (movement and fast talking), disorganization, sluggish motivation, etc. I see trouble in deeply getting what I read, homilies, talks, lectures, some conversations, etc. It's like my ears and eyes glaze over what I hear and read, especially reading, and with long talks. I also notice that I do silly things, like I don't right away figure out who was first in order at a stop sign intersection; I'll mishear what someone says; I'll need a repeat of directions; I'll forget something I was going to do; I'll ask a question but neglect to fully listen to the answer; etc. Just silly things. It's like senility has set in! :p

I'd like to hear from other people with Learning Disabilities. How do you cope with it?

I especially would like to know how you deal with the issues with poor comprehension, retention, retrieval and memory? This really makes education tough as I don't remember everything I learn very well (it also doesn't sink in immediately and takes a lot of going over), and if I end up going into a work apostolate, I'll need to be able to learn and work at something. Even if I go into the retreat/spirituality apostolate of a certain Order, I still need to work with papers, studying, possible teaching, etc.

I had a reevaluation with a speech-language pathologist last year and they said I did well on their testing, but I don't feel it reflected my issues. So, they weren't able to work with me. A learning center that I had gone to as a child said I could go in for re-testing, but they are wayyyyy too far for me to go for lessons. I asked if I could do any work at home with their books, but it was a no-go.

Any advice would be greatly appreciated, and please share how you deal with your issues and silly mishaps.

God bless you. :):D


#2

All of the above sound very familiar to me, minus the treatment.


#3

I have dyslexia and Irlens syndrome [its an eyeball thing where I get fancy coloured lenses]. I was tested by educational psychiatrists and they told me I should essentially be illiterate.

How do I deal with it? I harden up. I realised a long time ago that I wasn't like the other kids when it came to understanding and learning, but I also realised that if I accepted that and just mucked around I'd end up with a dead end, go no where job. I decided that wasn't for me. So, I just worked harder than anyone else in class and accepted that my spelling would always be shocking, my speech impediement would always get laughs and the depth perception from Irlens would always be an irritant.

The other trick I've found helps is finding what you really, really like and sticking to it, using that as your foundation for other pathways of study. I have a few "aspergers" traits so I can be quite one tracked, ancient Egyptain mythology, a few select video games, algebra, pro-life argument, Catholic apologetics, the things I liked, I read and learnt and from those books I found spelling, grammar and comprehension became a little easier in other subjects I wasn't so fond of. My parents tried to get me to read girly books like the babysitters club, but when my parents found me reading my brother's science books they got me a second hand set of encylopaedias that kept my interest.

I have a low opinion of people who use dyslexia as a crotch or as an excuse for poor academic success - I know a lot of people who do this. It makess the rest of us hard working dyslexics look like morons and for many, many years I kept my mouth shut because I didn't want to be associated with such lazy individuals.

But honestly, I don't consider dyselxia a disability, I refer to it as "my learning quirk", those with dyslexcia have an above average, mine's genius level, IQ. Sure, the dyslexia dumbs it down a tad and I'm not going to be a rocket scientist, but I'm happy where I am and I worked my fingers to the bone to get where I am, not to mention hearing quite a few insults from teachers and other students along the way. Even missed out on a few jobs because people I knew told propsective employers that I was dyslexic! People need to stop whinging about their "learning disabilities" and find their own way to come out on top. Its possible. You just have to want it. I've spent so much time on improving my "quirks" that now peopel honestly don't beleive me when I tell them I have dyslexia. :thumbsup:


#4

[quote="JoyfulLife, post:1, topic:245501"]
Hello, :D

I have mild/moderate ADHD and Dyslexia. I take a stimulant medicine for the ADHD and I had therapy as a child for the Dyslexia. I still have some lingering Dylsexia issues with comprehension, retention, retrieval and memory. The ADHD tends to show up in issues with attention, concentration, hyperactivity (movement and fast talking), disorganization, sluggish motivation, etc. I see trouble in deeply getting what I read, homilies, talks, lectures, some conversations, etc. It's like my ears and eyes glaze over what I hear and read, especially reading, and with long talks. I also notice that I do silly things, like I don't right away figure out who was first in order at a stop sign intersection; I'll mishear what someone says; I'll need a repeat of directions; I'll forget something I was going to do; I'll ask a question but neglect to fully listen to the answer; etc. Just silly things. It's like senility has set in! :p

I'd like to hear from other people with Learning Disabilities. How do you cope with it?

I especially would like to know how you deal with the issues with poor comprehension, retention, retrieval and memory? This really makes education tough as I don't remember everything I learn very well (it also doesn't sink in immediately and takes a lot of going over), and if I end up going into a work apostolate, I'll need to be able to learn and work at something. Even if I go into the retreat/spirituality apostolate of a certain Order, I still need to work with papers, studying, possible teaching, etc.

I had a reevaluation with a speech-language pathologist last year and they said I did well on their testing, but I don't feel it reflected my issues. So, they weren't able to work with me. A learning center that I had gone to as a child said I could go in for re-testing, but they are wayyyyy too far for me to go for lessons. I asked if I could do any work at home with their books, but it was a no-go.

Any advice would be greatly appreciated, and please share how you deal with your issues and silly mishaps.

God bless you. :):D

[/quote]

I have all those things except for the dyslexia. It has been really hard for me all my life. Kids at school would always catch me not paying attention to the conversation and I would be so embarrassed. I missed so much in class when I was in grade school but in high school and college I had to scribble down ALL the teachers words and then study it at home later to get good grades. In addition to the ADHD, I have an anxiety disorder. It was horrible learning new jobs. I constantly daydream while doing anything so I miss exits, take wrong turns, talk too much, forget things, interrupt people, can't listen to others very well, get hyper, sluggish, and have a hard time putting my thoughts into words. It takes me quite a while to post here too. Now that I am older I have tried to see myself as unique and different. It still hurts a lot when I am made fun of but I try to meditate on how God loves me just the way he made me.:)


#5

I haven't been to a psychiatrist so I don't know. But sometimes I feel like I'm kind of adhd-ish. I tend to stare into space, glaze over what I'm reading, forgetful, repeating the same mistakes, experiencing irritability, difficulty concentrating. I also tend to have many thoughts in my mind at the same time. :shrug:


#6

Well, I was a left-handed kid when it came to writing, though I did other things with my right hand. For this reason, decision was made to have me switch. And I've had a "disorder in the fine motorics of the right hand" ever since, along with distorted hand-eye coordination and whatever else (including any sort of coordination, basically :p).

I also had dyslexia. The hard kind. Mirror-imaged letters, wrong letter order, utterly awful hand-writing, inconsistent letter shapes, glaring spelling and other errors. But perhaps some of those were a normal thing with a child, I don't know, in fact, I know nothing about the early development of linguistic competence in children. In fact, I couldn't learn to tie my shoe-laces properly (and still haven't been able to :D) and I would confuse the right with the left (which was less fun when I'd confuse west and east during geography lessons and everybody would think I was a lazy uneducated student when I said Greece was in South-Western Europe).

But it also seemed that wherever I had a disability, I also had a parallel talent. It's really strange because while I did have a "challenge" in terms of spelling, I could also easily learn the rules and pick up the practical usage from books I read, to the point my grammar teacher would ask me when she didn't know. And that was when I was 11 or 12 or something like that. I also had a similar talent for grammar and style and the strange-like-heck structures that appeared in my writing when I was a younger kid eventually disappeared. I went on and learnt foreign languages to the point of four at the same time one year, two of them dead. There were awful stumbling blocks but there was also obvious talent, obvious gifts, as if to match.

As for memory, retention and the like, when I was a kid, it was enough for me to read the coursebooks during summer and I could essentially read for pleasure and play computer games for the reast of the year. I was initially the top student, then close to the top, then things took a sour turn, then I actually managed to get below my highschool's average GPA one year, having had flying colours from top to bottom of my early certificates from elementary and then still landing above straight A for several years.

In fact, I'd say most of my problems with grades related to a lack of understanding with the teacher. This was mostly about the method of task solving or presenting the results, or the way a question was framed or the answer was to be framed, although at times I would indeed simply not know the answer to a question. But in most cases the teachers giving me low grades were quirky or had personal problems with me, which messed up the learning and grading process. I had to learn to deal with the blame or shame I considered unmerited. And yeah, I had a lot of wars with teachers, in fact, that's the very reason I was set on my way to become a lawyer. I was lawyering with them at age 10 and now at age 28, I still have nightmares about some of them. And the other kids were a nightmare too.

Where was I... ah, retention. Yeah. Well. Because I was such a "genius", I never learnt to learn the way a normal person does. And this hurt back because later on studying wouldn't work that great for me. With lots of cramming information for an exam, I'd still forget a lot of the stupid little details that would be asked during an exam. Speaking of which, I developed people skills and actually read about communication at a young age to gain an edge in oral examinations. Worked like charm. ;) I once got an A when being surprise-attacked by the literature teacher about a book I hadn't actually read (in highschool, I preferred to sit quietly and read sci-fi books, ignoring the teacher and whatever she went on about ;)). Twice, I think. In law school, I knew that general questions would mean an A. Getting the examiner in any sort of conversation would mean an A unless I messed something up, in which case it'd be B or B+. Detailed grilling would almost certainly lead to a narrow pass and definitely not an A.

There's more but I've already been talking about myself for too long. Right now I'm in the last year of a law Ph.D./SJD programme, working as a freelance professional translator (registered sole-prop) en route to qualifying for official certification and having finished a post-graduate (Master's degree was a prerequisite) study in translation and interpreting. So I basically work with language.


#7

Hah, probably could tell you about the bar admission attempt. Hilarious. I was working in a law firm, didn't have much free time, needed some rest too, so I didn't study much more than was necessary in the light of the previous years' sets of questions. In fact, the night before the exam, I scored 95% on the questions from the immediately preceding year, so I decided that was enough (76% was required to pass). Apparently, the Minister of Justice/Attorney General's staff had a different idea, especially as the political leadership had just changed that year, and decided to deliver a hecatomb. I was mostly pissed off at them because of the reliance interest but the matter basically hinged on some 3 questions that were ungrammatically or otherwise unprofessionally framed by the question-making board. I litigated them to hell to back, publishing materials for everybody to download and then still writing things for people who had different sets of questions. I went to court for every hearing anybody had, I actually approached plaintiffs' counsel with notes listing precedents they could use and so on. For my own hearings, I made a point of going in without notes and talking as long and in as much detail as I could get away with (and then some). I won, following hundreds of pages of writing, and on mutual appeal (I appealed the ruling I won) I utterly levelled a trial law prof appearing for the Minister of Justice/Attorney General (and teaching the very subject that included the procedure being used by the court), to the point I made the justices laugh at the AG.

... I still lost on a single test question (out of the initial three) that was both a ruse and a violation of logic, where a correct answer (straight quotation from the statute, which is legally a true statement by definition) because another proposed answer was narrower and thus supposedly more correct. The justices didn't catch (apart from making a glaring procedural error they can get away with because they're the highest tier of appeal... that is, until I move for reassumption of the whole thing and hell breaks loose), although the trial judges could and did, and accordingly reversed and remanded. Still litigating and it's probably going to last forever.

But meanwhile I'm just finishing the Ph.D./SJD programme that allows skipping the normal four year admission process and jump in as a full-fledged attorney following a single exam (the same one trainee attorneys take as their final). And the first thing I do after that is writing to the court that the fact I've been admitted doesn't mean the case that's been at bar for years now has lost merit.

... So, basically, I always get in trouble because of ungrammatical or logically flawed exam questions. This is the kind of situation I hate the most. And, in a legal context, judges or justices that don't catch what I'm talking about to them, even where the opposing counsel understands and agrees off the record. :rolleyes: As for the translation job, I sometimes run into trouble with proofreaders who don't understand the source text, if they at all look at it. This is probably the counterpart of the foregoing.

Anyway, you can conquer any disability. It doesn't mean you can eradicate it. It means you can still excell at what you want to do or what you have to do.

Except my hand-writing. That one is unsurmountable. :p

Edit: By the way, I can't do interpreting. It's not that I won't find the words or can't speak fluently enough. I just don't have the memory. I can remember obscure details of things and thousands of them. But I can't force myself to remember several sentences someone's just said and repeat them in a different language if I can't repeat them in the same language they were said. I've once forgotten a single sentence halfway through it.

And can't ever find the keys or the personal ID (you have a card for that in this country), oftentimes the mobile phone or glasses. Right now, I have no idea where my wallet is. If I get back to law, I'll need a mean and imposing secretary to remember the deadlines for me and make sure I don't charm her with assurances that yeah, I remember it, I have it right hear... ooops, looks like I've just missed it anyway. ;) My notorious lack of punctuality is probably related to this problem.


#8

I've never been diagnosed but I know (beyond a shadow of a doubt) that I have Asperger syndrome. Let's just say that friends were/are very hard to come by.

I know that I have some auditory issues also. I have to watch the lips of the person I'm speaking to so I can understand what is being said. In church, I have to read along with the mass, I can't listen to the readings and grasp what was said. Phone conversations are hell for me. I hate the phone. It seems like the person I have to speak with talks like a mouse and won't speak up. OR, the person talks too dang loud.

I'm sure that I have some ADD (no hyperactivity).


#9

with ADD and homilies....I hear one nugget, and off the brain goes to parts unknown. The best thing I've found to combat this is to imagine I'm going to have to repeat the homily. So he says A, I think A, then he says B, and I think A, then B, he says C, I think A, B, and C, and so on. Then at the end, make it a game to summarize the whole thing to yourself.


#10

I was never diagnosed, but I can tell you I have / had something....

When I was in school I could read anything but could tell you absolutely nothing of what I just read. Now a days I am able to do so but then again, I only read things of interest.

I also can not memorize anything. I have to learn it. I was and still am a horrible test taker as a result.

Back then I was told by teachers and my parents I was lazy and "didn't apply myself". I would sit for hours trying which led to barely passing (think C's and D's). In high school I was in remedial everything and still barely made it.

Ultimately somehow I made it and eventually obtained an associates degree in college.

I hated school and would never, ever, ever want to go back to those school days. College was a little (but not totally) different and for some reason, was a little easier for me in certain subjects.

Funny, because as an adult, many people tell me how smart I am... I only share my story to let them know how smart I'm not.

Not sure what I would be diagnosed with but I hope no one ever has to go through it.


#11

I am almost certainly ADD, a distinction that did not exist even when I was raising my children. My son was just called first retarded (yes, they used that word as a diagnosis) then when he started cooperating with testing, simply hyperactive. Then as more physical disabilities became apparent his label changed each year with his IEP. So I start out suspicious of labels that were assigned through the public school process.

Based on what I see in my grandchildren and comments wise parents have made to me when I describe some of my coping mechanisms ADD seems very apt. I also have always been dyslexic for numbers if that is a separate thing, transposing phone numbers, addresses etc. esp. when tired. I have a habit of always asking for them 2-3 times and double checking which drives people nuts but saves time later. Thank heaven for cell phones.

I read a book by a minister's wife on how ADD and ADHD undiagnosed in adults can affect spiritual life as well as family life and found her descriptions and ways to overcome these difficulties to be spot on.

I don't know if this is a disorder or a learning style but I have a hard time learning by putting pieces together, but learn better by seeing the whole and deconstructing. Learning to sew was an example. I had a horrible time in school learning to sew from a pattern and envisioning the fnished garment, but if I see a garment, I know exactly how it will come apart and how to copy it. gestalt thinking, I believe it is called. Same with the mechanics of something, or designing a curriculum.


#12

I had severe ADHD growing up. It's a lot better now though. :)


#13

I'd also suggest books and the web site by Ed Hallowell. He is an expert on ADD and ADHD that has ADD himself. He sees it very much as learning to navigate a turtle world as a squirrel. In other words, it isn't wrong to be a squirrel, but when everyone else is a turtle, it is inevitable that we have to adjust....particularly since we are going to have problems if we marry either a turtle or another squirrel that couples in the more common turtle-turtle marriages don't have to concern themselves with.

There are ways to adjust without beating yourself up for not being a turtle or for giving up the gifts that come with being a squirrel. I like the way he thinks.

You can sample his outlook at www.drhallowell.com.


#14

[quote="JoyfulLife, post:1, topic:245501"]
Hello, :D

I have mild/moderate ADHD and Dyslexia. I take a stimulant medicine for the ADHD and I had therapy as a child for the Dyslexia. I still have some lingering Dylsexia issues with comprehension, retention, retrieval and memory. The ADHD tends to show up in issues with attention, concentration, hyperactivity (movement and fast talking), disorganization, sluggish motivation, etc. I see trouble in deeply getting what I read, homilies, talks, lectures, some conversations, etc. It's like my ears and eyes glaze over what I hear and read, especially reading, and with long talks. I also notice that I do silly things, like I don't right away figure out who was first in order at a stop sign intersection; I'll mishear what someone says; I'll need a repeat of directions; I'll forget something I was going to do; I'll ask a question but neglect to fully listen to the answer; etc. Just silly things. It's like senility has set in! :p

I'd like to hear from other people with Learning Disabilities. How do you cope with it?

I especially would like to know how you deal with the issues with poor comprehension, retention, retrieval and memory? This really makes education tough as I don't remember everything I learn very well (it also doesn't sink in immediately and takes a lot of going over), and if I end up going into a work apostolate, I'll need to be able to learn and work at something. Even if I go into the retreat/spirituality apostolate of a certain Order, I still need to work with papers, studying, possible teaching, etc.

I had a reevaluation with a speech-language pathologist last year and they said I did well on their testing, but I don't feel it reflected my issues. So, they weren't able to work with me. A learning center that I had gone to as a child said I could go in for re-testing, but they are wayyyyy too far for me to go for lessons. I asked if I could do any work at home with their books, but it was a no-go.

Any advice would be greatly appreciated, and please share how you deal with your issues and silly mishaps.

God bless you. :):D

[/quote]

I have a mild form of ADHD but not dyslexia. In my grade school years I was extremely hyperactive and could not focus long enough to sit and learn anything. I was really around 8 or 9 before I really could sit still and learn. They didn't know anything about ADD in those days so I was classified with a learning disability. In fact if you put something in front of me back then that was interesting enough I could focus it's called "hyper focusing" thing is when you hyper focus everything else gets ignored. To make a long story short I was never on meds but for a short time. I've never reacted to med well so I couldn't take them they didn't do anything to help. I learned to keep myself occupied eat a healthy diet and get involved with lots of exercise. Once I started these I did fine with learning. It's true what they say you are what you eat. School has always been and always will be hard. I still have to take lots of notes because I can't study. When I've tried to study I can only manage it about 20 minutes then my focus automatically shifts....unless it's something I'm really interested in. I still don't take meds. I've just learned as to manage it all with diet and exercise as I mentioned above. I'm able to focus nowdays but still need to write things down so they don't get missed. Also being organized helps too. I rarely miss anything these days.


#15

[quote="Luvz2travel, post:14, topic:245501"]
I have a mild form of ADHD but not dyslexia. In my grade school years I was extremely hyperactive and could not focus long enough to sit and learn anything. I was really around 8 or 9 before I really could sit still and learn. They didn't know anything about ADD in those days so I was classified with a learning disability. In fact if you put something in front of me back then that was interesting enough I could focus it's called "hyper focusing" thing is when you hyper focus everything else gets ignored. To make a long story short I was never on meds but for a short time. I've never reacted to med well so I couldn't take them they didn't do anything to help. I learned to keep myself occupied eat a healthy diet and get involved with lots of exercise. Once I started these I did fine with learning. It's true what they say you are what you eat. School has always been and always will be hard. I still have to take lots of notes because I can't study. When I've tried to study I can only manage it about 20 minutes then my focus automatically shifts....unless it's something I'm really interested in. I still don't take meds. I've just learned as to manage it all with diet and exercise as I mentioned above. I'm able to focus nowdays but still need to write things down so they don't get missed. Also being organized helps too. I rarely miss anything these days.

[/quote]

This sounds a lot like me. I was and am very hyperactive and I have to write everything down because I forget and miss so many things when I just listen. I wrote all that the teacher said down word for word so I could get good grades. If I am really interested in something I can hyper focus but like you said I don't notice anything else that is going on around me and since I also daydream constantly I again am missing everything going on.

People will say to me you know that (name of some store or place) and I will not know what they are talking about because I never notice things around me. I am oblivious most of the time. I often wonder how I have not managed to be killed in a car accident. Thank you God! I always try to remember to do the sign of the cross before I get into the car.


#16

Hi - I have ADD, anxiety, some Asperger-like traits, auditory processing difficulties. I can be really distractible "Oh, look, a squirrel" or hyperfocused "In a minute, can't you see I'm busy!" and I'd be lost if I didn't write things down and sometimes I'm still lost! :confused:

It can be a challenge but also there are compensations such as creativity. Please consider yourselves invited to the

ADD/ADHD Adult Catholics group -

forums.catholic.com/group.php?groupid=648?styleid=18

We're a fun bunch :D:D:D and we'd enjoy having all of you!


#17

I also have always been dyslexic for numbers if that is a separate thing, transposing phone numbers, addresses etc. esp. when tired. I have a habit of always asking for them 2-3 times and double checking which drives people nuts but saves time later. Thank heaven for cell phones.

this has gotten worse for me as i get older. when people ask me dates/ times/ amounts they assume i'm well-versed in, i often reply (jokingly) "forty two." because it could be as right a guess as any other number guess.

I read a book by a minister's wife on how ADD and ADHD undiagnosed in adults can affect spiritual life as well as family life and found her descriptions and ways to overcome these difficulties to be spot on.

please do tell.


#18

[quote="onmyknees, post:15, topic:245501"]
This sounds a lot like me. I was and am very hyperactive and I have to write everything down because I forget and miss so many things when I just listen. I wrote all that the teacher said down word for word so I could get good grades. If I am really interested in something I can hyper focus but like you said I don't notice anything else that is going on around me and since I also daydream constantly I again am missing everything going on.

People will say to me you know that (name of some store or place) and I will not know what they are talking about because I never notice things around me. I am oblivious most of the time. I often wonder how I have not managed to be killed in a car accident. Thank you God! I always try to remember to do the sign of the cross before I get into the car.

[/quote]

I would recommend the book called "Driven to Distraction". It covers all the basics of ADD and ADHD. It also explains a lot of the problems and does offer some practical solutions to deal with it. I also recommend a good exercise program or finding a hobbie you love as well as eating a good low sugar and low carb diet this has been the most effective thing for me. I'm never more relaxed then when I'm floating down a nice quiet river in my kayak (my hobbie). Reading is also a good way to relax and keeps your mind occupied. People with ADD have brains that are wired to always be looking for stimulation that's why we get distracted so easily. We are also more inclined to addictions...mine is caffine but some turn to alcholhol or other stimulants to self medicate. Just bare that in mind. :cool:


#19

[quote="puzzleannie, post:11, topic:245501"]
I am almost certainly ADD, a distinction that did not exist even when I was raising my children. My son was just called first retarded (yes, they used that word as a diagnosis) then when he started cooperating with testing, simply hyperactive. Then as more physical disabilities became apparent his label changed each year with his IEP. So I start out suspicious of labels that were assigned through the public school process.

Based on what I see in my grandchildren and comments wise parents have made to me when I describe some of my coping mechanisms ADD seems very apt. I also have always been dyslexic for numbers if that is a separate thing, transposing phone numbers, addresses etc. esp. when tired. I have a habit of always asking for them 2-3 times and double checking which drives people nuts but saves time later. Thank heaven for cell phones.

I read a book by a minister's wife on how ADD and ADHD undiagnosed in adults can affect spiritual life as well as family life and found her descriptions and ways to overcome these difficulties to be spot on.

I don't know if this is a disorder or a learning style but I have a hard time learning by putting pieces together, but learn better by seeing the whole and deconstructing. Learning to sew was an example. I had a horrible time in school learning to sew from a pattern and envisioning the fnished garment, but if I see a garment, I know exactly how it will come apart and how to copy it. gestalt thinking, I believe it is called. Same with the mechanics of something, or designing a curriculum.

[/quote]

It is a learning disability because of the lack of ability to focus long enough to learn and to retain verbal instructions. I always have to write things down. Verbal directions have always been the worst. I just tell people nowdays I have to write it down I'll forget verbal directions almost as soon as they are done giving them. LOL. If I read directions though I'm fine. It's just a matter of how your brain is wired to learn. If I write down the directions I usually don't have to look at them again. :rolleyes:


#20

[quote="Luvz2travel, post:19, topic:245501"]
It is a learning disability because of the lack of ability to focus long enough to learn and to retain verbal instructions. I always have to write things down. Verbal directions have always been the worst. I just tell people nowdays I have to write it down I'll forget verbal directions almost as soon as they are done giving them. LOL. If I read directions though I'm fine. It's just a matter of how your brain is wired to learn. If I write down the directions I usually don't have to look at them again. :rolleyes:

[/quote]

Lol, I'm so lousy with verbal directions myself too. Had an opportunity today, just told them to show me the way since it wasn't far and it was a business thing. Wonder if it's connected to my epic fails at interpreting. People have accused me of retardation on the basis of "errr?" reactions to whatever they had been saying I hadn't been able to process the way they had intended.

[quote="Luvz2travel, post:18, topic:245501"]
People with ADD have brains that are wired to always be looking for stimulation that's why we get distracted so easily. We are also more inclined to addictions...mine is caffine but some turn to alcholhol or other stimulants to self medicate. Just bare that in mind. :cool:

[/quote]

That sounds familiar too. I work as a translator these years and most of the work is done in a certain software application everybody uses. You have no idea how hard it may be to sit in that window without getting distracted all the time by all sorts of things, especially if they text is boring... oh wait, you do. And forget it if there's no urgent deadline to motivate.


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