Zoarostrianism


#1

I am not an expert on Zoarostrianism but from what I know about it it seems to have a lot of similarites to Christianity and Judaism(one god, struggle between good and evil, judged by actions, end of the world is climatic battle between Ahura Mazda (their god) and the forces of good, against the spirit of evil and those who chose evil, in which good will prevail) and promotes many good values. I also recently learned that the three wise men were Zoarostrian and it was the first religion that promised rewards for good deeds and punishment for evil ones. When I learned that I started to wonder if Zoarostrianism was kind of a precurser to Christianity and perhaps God created it to lead people to live good lives before Jesus’s birth. Does any one out there who knows a little about this religion think my theory may have some validity?

Thanks,
Andrew


#2

If I have a flawed understanding of Zoroastrianism, I apologize, but from what I know, there is a fatal flaw that I think throws a wrench in the works of your theory.

Z. is a dualist religion; the evil force is not dependent on the good force, unlike Christianity. We believe that Evil could not exist without Good, whereas Z. purports that each Evil and Good are independent forces. The classic problem with dualism is, of course, who wins? And why? If you have an ultimately unstoppable force that meets an ultimately immovable object, what happens?

Also, as is my understanding, we (that is, creation) is merely a side-effect of their struggle, much unlike Christian belief.

From what I understand, Christianity and Z. are unrelated, historically and theologically. Considering the aspect of the nature of God that promises that he will not deceive us, I say no, of course God did not create Z. He created Judaism, which morphed into Christianity. He created no false religion.

Once again, I am ignorant of much, and would love to be corrected of anything I might be wrong about.


#3

I understand that their members get to wear capes and carry swords!

:rotfl:


#4

The Persians were a powerful cultural element in that area for centuries It is possible that many of their dualist concepts were widely known.

I’ve seen some historical treatises that argue that the ancient Hebrews picked up much of their monotheism while in exile in the east.


#5

[quote=Sgt Sweaters]If I have a flawed understanding of Zoroastrianism, I apologize, but from what I know, there is a fatal flaw that I think throws a wrench in the works of your theory.

Z. is a dualist religion; the evil force is not dependent on the good force, unlike Christianity. We believe that Evil could not exist without Good, whereas Z. purports that each Evil and Good are independent forces. The classic problem with dualism is, of course, who wins? And why? If you have an ultimately unstoppable force that meets an ultimately immovable object, what happens?

Also, as is my understanding, we (that is, creation) is merely a side-effect of their struggle, much unlike Christian belief.

From what I understand, Christianity and Z. are unrelated, historically and theologically. Considering the aspect of the nature of God that promises that he will not deceive us, I say no, of course God did not create Z. He created Judaism, which morphed into Christianity. He created no false religion.

Once again, I am ignorant of much, and would love to be corrected of anything I might be wrong about.
[/quote]

I believe you are correct in saying that they believe evil is independent of good, but they also believe that the good will be rewarded and that good will ultimatly prevail over evil, much like christianity. I am not saying they are exactaly the same, but have many similarities. I have been facinated by these similarities and when I learned the Magi where Zoarastrians, I thought, “gee, maybe there’s somthing here,” I am not saying I am going to convert to it (I don’t think I will ever be anything but Catholic), I’m just saying that it could contain an element of truth. The magi clearly new that Jesus was very important and a King. They were led to Jesus by God (the star), this suggests that the Z were more in tune with the truths of God than those of other pre-christian, pagan faiths. Does the Church comment on what happens to the Magi after they return to their homland?

God Bless,
Andrew


#6

Grace & Peace!

Regarding a historical connection to Christianity, many scholars believe that the Magi who visited Our Lord were Zorastrian priests. Apocryphal infancy gospels accept this as a given.

The influence that Zoroastrian could have had on Christianity would have come from Judaism. Certain aspects of Persian religion had become quite popular (angelology, demonology, heavens, hells) and had influenced popular Judaism by the time of Christ. I often suspect that the development of “the satan” (used as a title of an angelic being in the OT, and only once or twice used as a proper name) into the devil is due to Zoroastrian influence. We must admit as well, that despite the orthodox position, popular interpretations of Christian views of good and evil, including those held by Christian believers, often seem to have more in common with dualism than they do with orthodox belief. I suspect that were this cleared up, there would be less worry and fear of the devil and more of an understanding of the reliance of all good things upon the Good.

–Mark

Deo Gratias


#7

Grace & Peace!

Andrew, re: the Zoroastrians return to their homeland, there’s a funny story in one of the apocryphal infancy gospels in which Mary gives the Magi the swaddling clothes of Christ. On their return to their land, they conduct the Fire Ritual and place the swaddling clothes in the sacred fire. They do not burn, and they praise God in wonder.

–Mark

Deo Gratias!


#8

Trivia question:

What famous rock star was a “cradle” Zoroastrian.


#9

Not at all historical, but I just recalled the T. S. Eliot poem, Journey of the Magi. Give it a read:
americanpoems.com/poets/tseliot/6602


#10

[quote=Matt16_18]Trivia question:

What famous rock star was a “cradle” Zoroastrian.
[/quote]

Haven’t the slightest. Who?


#11

Grace & Peace!

Freddie Mercury, I believe, was a Zoroastrian.

–Mark

Deo Gratias!


#12

[quote=Deo Volente]Grace & Peace!

Freddie Mercury, I believe, was a Zoroastrian.

–Mark

Deo Gratias!
[/quote]

Yep. Freddie Mercury, the lead singer of Queen.


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